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Concerts in park kick off summer

Roosevelt Diggs performed at Morley Park last Thursday night. Post photo by J. Reed.

Roosevelt Diggs performed at Morley Park last Thursday night. Post photo by J. Reed.

Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recreation kicked off their summer series of concerts at Morley Park last Thursday, June 18, with local band Roosevelt Diggs.

The band’s unique mix of country, folk, bluegrass and blues was a feast for the ears, and it was a beautiful summer evening to sit and relax with friends and family.

There were concessions on site, and free raffle tickets gave concert-goers a chance to win prizes from area businesses.

Check out Roosevelt Diggs on YouTube, or their website rooseveltdigs.com to see where they perform next. Their album “Songs from the Shed” is available on their website or at Amazon.com.

The next concert in the park is July 16 with Don Middlebrook. The Sea Cruisers will perform on August 20. Be sure to bring a lawn chair. Concerts start at 7 p.m.

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Summer reading programs flying high

Master Magician Thomas Plunkard delighted and mystified spectators

Master Magician Thomas Plunkard delighted and mystified spectators

Summer readers are off to a great start at the Cedar Springs Public Library! Since the big kick-off day on June 8, where over 800 came to get signed up and get their reading logs, 5 programs have hit their mark, as of Tuesday, June 23, with 203 in attendance! The biggest program was with Master Magician Thomas Plunkard, who pulled out every trick in the book before 139 delighted and mystified Cedar Springs spectators.

They have also hosted a geocaching treasure hunt, a preschool “Nature Dancing” morning with teacher and dancer Kathy Burch, an adult sunrise stretch with Christine Holman of Curves, and a teen Super Smash Brothers Brawl tournament with the Library’s youth services manager Kelly Roach, all within a week and a half. Wednesday programs for families are at 2 p.m. at the Cedar Springs Middle School.

Teen Super Smash Brothers Brawl tournament.

Teen Super Smash Brothers Brawl tournament.

Today (Thursday, June 25) if you hurry, you could catch the teen workshop with Valarie Roach, artist from Kalamazoo, and learn “How to Draw Superheroes” from 1:30 to 3:30pm at the library  or the adult program with author and long-time fraud examiner/police investigator Joe Koenig  from 7-8:30 p.m. at the United Methodist Church in their fellowship hall.

Check our website: cedarspringslibrary.org for a full listing of our fantastic programs and the generous local businesses and service organizations who bought them for your enjoyment.

We’re looking forward to such programs as a Theater Workshop, Zeemo and his Zany Science show, the John Ball Traveling Zoo, Wolverine Skyhawks Air Show and our very own Sgt. Jason Kelly showing off a local police car, radio, and all those gadgets he carries around on his belt and more.

Read for fun and prizes—all ages from babies to senior citizens. Sign up today, get a card, get a log, get a book. Finish all of your reading coupons and start on the finisher coupons for a chance to win a Kindle Fire, a bike or a refurbished Xbox 360.

The Cedar Springs Library is going full speed ahead. Someday, in the near future, they will begin building a new library facility, five times bigger than the one they have now–9,998 sq. ft. They have around $600,000 now, other monies pledged and a goal, with the help of the Community Building Development Team, to build a library that is debt-free.

If you want to help raise an additional $800,000, or if you want to donate, contact the library at 616-696-1910 or the Community Building Development Team at CSCommunityCenter.org.  Meetings for the Library Board are the 4th Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Library, and for the CBDT the 3rd Tuesday of each month, 6 p.m. on the top floor of the Cedar Springs Schools District Office building (Hilltop).

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Man honored for saving boy’s life

Tpr Tim Cruttenden (Lakeview Post – Investigating Officer), Mr. Drew Trudell (employee of Mr. Hansen’s) Mr. Kenneth Hansen, Mr. Brian Hansen (employee of Mr. Hansen and brother to Kenneth)  and F/Lt Kevin Sweeney (Lakeview Post Commander).

Tpr Tim Cruttenden (Lakeview Post – Investigating Officer), Mr. Drew Trudell (employee of Mr. Hansen’s) Mr. Kenneth Hansen, Mr. Brian Hansen (employee of Mr. Hansen and brother to Kenneth) and F/Lt Kevin Sweeney (Lakeview Post Commander).

On June 3, 2015, the Michigan State Police (MSP) recognized Mr. Kenneth Hansen, of Crystal, with a Distinguished Citizen award for his heroic actions in saving the life of a child during a dog attack.

On May 4, 2015, while working at a construction site in Seville Township, about 5:10 p.m., Mr. Hansen and his work crew heard the screams of a child at a nearby residence.

The child, an 8-year-old boy, went over to visit his step-grandmother. He was familiar with the dogs there, four rottweilers, which were in a fenced in back yard of the residence. As the child walked into the back yard, one dog began barking at him. Another dog knocked the child down and the four dogs attacked him.

It was then that Hansen heard the screams, and saw the four dogs attacking the boy. He jumped over the fence and carried the child to safety inside the house, even with the dogs continuing to bite at the child. The boy suffered 22 bite wounds, and was treated at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital and released that evening.

“There is no doubt in my mind that the actions of Mr. Hansen saved the life of this child,” stated F/Lt Kevin Sweeney, commander of the Michigan State Police Lakeview Post. “Mr. Hansen knowingly, and without hesitation, put himself in harm’s way to save the life of another.”

The recognition was given to him in front of his work crew, at a job site in Oakfield Township.

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Parents play a big role in keeping teen drivers safe

 

(c) National Safety Council

(c) National Safety Council

(StatePoint) For teens, getting behind a wheel can seem like an exciting taste of freedom. But too much leeway too soon can have dangerous results. Car crashes are the number one killer of teens, and half of all teens will be involved in a car crash before graduating high school, reports the National Safety Council (NSC).

Luckily, states with a Teen Safe Driving Coalition are helping change the game. The Coalitions — comprised of state and local government, law enforcement, public health agencies, traffic safety and injury prevention organizations, academia, businesses, teens, parents and crash survivors — were established by NSC and The Allstate Foundation. They have worked at the grassroots level for the last four years to educate parents and teens about the risks of teen driving. Coalitions exist in California, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas to offer solutions for parents to help teens be safer.

The results have been effective. Crashes involving 15- to 17- year-old drivers in Coalition states have dropped nearly 34 percent since the Coalitions were established four years ago, whereas non-coalition states have experienced just a 19.5 percent drop, according to NSC analysis of federal fatality data.

The Coalitions’ success is in part because they promote a program that indisputably saves lives. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL), a proven method of reducing teen drivers’ crash risk by 20 to 40 percent, works by maximizing experience while minimizing common driving risks teens face, such as nighttime driving and carrying teen passengers. This allows new drivers to gain experience with less exposure to high-risk scenarios. All 50 states and D.C. have implemented some form of GDL.

“Beyond legislation, parents have a role to play as well,” says Kathy Bernstein, senior manager of teen driving initiatives, NSC. “As the number one resource when it comes to teaching teens to drive, parents should stay involved well after teens get their licenses.”

With that in mind, Bernstein is offering some life-saving tips to families with new drivers:

  • Parents should drive with teens regularly even after they receive their license. A minimum of 30 minutes weekly can help ensure that safe driving skills are being employed.
  • Talk with teens about managing distractions, such as phones — both handheld and hands-free — the radio, other young passengers, and even beautiful roadside scenery. When teens are driving, they must stay focused on the task at hand.
  • Mile for mile, 16 and 17 year-old drivers are about three times as likely​ to be involved in a fatal car crash at night than during the day, according to “Injury Prevention,” a peer review journal. Parents should give teens opportunities to learn nighttime driving skills with an adult supervisor in the car.
  • One of the best ways for teens to learn to drive is by example. So practice safe habits always.
  • Visit the Drive it Home site at www.DriveitHome.org for resources, such as weekly driving lessons and the New Driver Deal, a contract which parents and teens can create together that outlines household driving rules and the consequences for breaking them.

“Remember, it’s not whether teens are ‘good kids’ or ‘responsible.’ New drivers share one thing in common — lack of experience,” says Bernstein. “The more practice driving teens get, the better.”

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Two state-record fish caught in West Michigan

White Perch Record: This 2-pound white perch was caught by Cindy Lou Cordo, of North Muskegon, on Bear Lake (Muskegon County) this spring.



White Perch Record: This 2-pound white perch was caught by Cindy Lou Cordo, of North Muskegon, on Bear Lake (Muskegon County) this spring.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources recently confirmed two new state-record fish for black buffalo and white perch. This marks the second and third state-record fish caught in 2015.

The state record for black buffalo was broken by a fish caught by Sage Colegrove of Muskegon on the Grand River in Ottawa County Sunday, April 12, at 1 a.m. Colegrove was bowfishing. The fish weighed 44.54 pounds and measured 38.50 inches.

The record was verified by Rich O’Neal, a DNR fisheries biologist in Muskegon.

Black Buffalo Record: Sage Colegrove (right) holds on to his new state-record black buffalo, with help from friend Richard Laing (left). The 44.54-pounder was caught on the Grand River in Ottawa County.

Black Buffalo Record: Sage Colegrove (right) holds on to his new state-record black buffalo, with help from friend Richard Laing (left). The 44.54-pounder was caught on the Grand River in Ottawa County.

The previous state-record black buffalo was caught by Joshua Teunis on Bear Lake (Muskegon County) June 15, 2014. That fish weighed 41.25 pounds and measured 38.25 inches.

The state record for white perch was broken by a fish caught by Cindy Lou Cordo of North Muskegon on Bear Lake in Muskegon County Saturday, April 18, at 4:30 p.m. Cordo was baitcasting with a spinner. The fish weighed 2.0 pounds and measured 13.57 inches.

The record again was verified by Rich O’Neal.

The previous state-record white perch was caught by Aaron Slagh on Muskegon Lake (Muskegon County) Jan. 21, 2014. That fish weighed 1.93 pounds and measured 13.25 inches.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

For more information on fishing in Michigan – including a roster of state-record catches, visit Michigan.gov/fishing.

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Mulching Can Keep Your Lawn Healthy

BLOOM-Mulching

(StatePoint) When working in the yard, you may be tempted to simply bag your yard clippings and set them out to the curb for pick-up. But experts say that mulching grass clippings is a much better alternative for the health of your lawn and the health of the planet.

“Mulching is hands down one of the best ways to maintain a beautiful, low-maintenance lawn,” says Daryn Walters, at Exmark Manufacturing, a manufacturer of turf care equipment. “It’s free and it’s great for lawn health.”

Furthermore, mulching can help you greatly reduce your family’s contribution to landfill waste, points out Walters. Of all the municipal solid waste collected in the United States, 13.5 percent of it is comprised of yard trimmings, according to the EPA.

For best results, try these lawn care tips:

• Practice the 1/3rd Rule: Never cut more than 1/3 of the length of the grass blade when mowing, to avoid clippings accumulating on the surface and making your lawn susceptible to disease. Additionally, this will improve the productivity of your mower, as cutting more than that can bog it down with clippings.

• Use a Mulching Mower: Consider investing in a commercial mower to regain productivity that can decrease when mulching. Manufacturers such as Exmark offer mulching-specific blades on both their walk-behind and zero-turn riding mowers, designed to deliver maximum productivity and cut-quality when mulching.

• Ditch the Chemicals: There’s no need to pay for chemical fertilizers to give your lawn what it needs to thrive. Mulching feeds the lawn nutrients and organic material, and can even help with moisture retention — which can significantly reduce the time and expense you spend on watering the lawn.

More information about mulching, lawn care and mowers can be found at www.Exmark.com.

“Your yard trimmings are not trash — they are an effective, natural and free fertilizer,” says Walters. “For a healthy lawn, drop the bag and let the mulch do more for you.”

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Feeling short of breath? It could be something serious

Pete Mulliner, PFF Patient Ambassador

Pete Mulliner, PFF Patient Ambassador

Pete Mulliner at eight months with his grandparents

Pete Mulliner at eight months with his grandparents

(BPT) – Unlike many Americans, Pete Mulliner knew of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) long before he was actually diagnosed with it. His grandfather died from pulmonary fibrosis the year Mulliner was married. “Granddad was the go-to guy in my world,” Mulliner says. “He taught me how to use tools, renovate houses, how to think clearly and logically and how to approach life.”

Three years after his grandfather’s death, Mulliner lost his great-aunt to pulmonary fibrosis. He didn’t know it at the time, but his own diagnosis of this deadly disease would come much later.

A Certificated Flight Instructor who teaches pilots to respond safely no matter what, Mulliner first began to question whether something was wrong with him in the summer of 2012. “My wife and I live on a small farm near my hometown,” he says. “I noticed that when I took a walk outdoors, I’d get out of breath. I figured I was out of shape and that I needed to walk more.”

But his concerns worsened after a common cold left him with a barking cough. He sought treatment at an urgent care center but the medications he was prescribed had little effect. They were meant to treat a cold, not IPF.

According to Dr. Gregory Cosgrove, chief medical officer of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF), misdiagnoses of the disease are common. “The symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are non-specific and shared by many other and more common lung diseases,” he says. “As a result, patients are often misdiagnosed initially and an accurate diagnosis may be delayed by months or even years.”

Weeks after Mulliner’s first symptoms, he found himself in the ER with chest pains and an inability to breathe. “My coughing was so violent that I was pulling muscles in my chest,” he remembers. Additional physician visits and a CT scan discerned he had a lung disease but Mulliner wouldn’t learn he had IPF until he visited a pulmonologist.

He was at his daughter’s home, playing with his grandchildren, when his doctor first called and told him he had IPF. “It was like a kick in the gut,” Mulliner remembers. “I felt very alone. Then I realized I wasn’t the only one suffering from this.”

In this dark moment, Mulliner thought back to his pilot’s training. “You can’t take the pilot’s seat to wonder ‘what-if’ and ‘why me’ so I didn’t allow myself to do it then.” He went looking for support groups and found the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. “It was comforting to know that there was an advocate out there – that there was a voice speaking that much louder about the need to find a cure for this disease,” Mulliner says. “I wanted to add my voice to it. I signed up on the PFF’s Facebook and LinkedIn pages and felt an immediate sense of connection. I wasn’t so alone after all.”

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) may occur as the result of more than 200 different interstitial lung diseases. Dr. Cosgrove says one of the biggest ways the PFF can help patients is by sorting through the confusion that exists around PF. “With education and a better understanding of the different diseases that may cause PF, patients, family members and physicians not familiar with PF are often empowered,” he says.

Mulliner has felt the benefits of the support of PFF and he’s taking his battle with IPF one day at a time. “It has put finiteness to it,” he says of how IPF has affected his life, understanding that most people with IPF die only 2-3 years after diagnosis. “I am aware there is an end coming; I’m just trying to extend it. At this point in time, if I didn’t know I had IPF, I wouldn’t know I had IPF.”

And while Mulliner lives his life, others are working to save it.

In January, the PFF announced the expansion of its PFF Care Center Network, which is comprised of medical centers with specific expertise in treating PF and IPF, collectively utilizing a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to patient care and providing access to resources and support for both patients and caregivers. With the addition of 12 more sites to the Network, there are now 21 leading medical centers in 20 states. The PFF will further expand the PFF Care Center Network as funding permits, with the intention of adding additional sites to the Network later this year.

“As a leading advocate for the pulmonary fibrosis community, we are dedicated to advancing the care of people living with this deadly disease, and this starts with providing greater access to experienced care teams. The PFF Care Center Network fosters collaboration between sites and the sharing of best practices,” Dr. Cosgrove says. The PFF offers up-to-date information online as part of the PFF Patient Communication Center and in print, guidance on where to find treatment and support and information on regional and national events.

To learn more about the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, the PFF Care Center Network and the facilities involved, visit PulmonaryFibrosis.org.

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Renaissance Faire a hit

N-Ren-Faire1-King-and-Queen-Chamber-photo

You may have thought you were in a time warp if you ventured out to Morley Park last weekend, or happened to get ice cream at KC Kones and Coneys last Saturday and saw people dressed like they were from medieval times. That’s because the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce hosted its second annual Renaissance Faire last weekend, and over 300 people attended the event.

“We have many people who said they can’t wait for next year’s faire,” said Chamber President Perry Hopkins. “Some of the people that travel the Renaissance circuit said it was very impressive for a second year faire.”

He said that the cast loved being part of the Ice Cream with Queen Victoria at KC Kones and Coneys.

Hopkins estimated they had approximately 175 people wandering around the park on Friday, and they counted 35 people who stayed to watch the Disney animated movie Robin Hood.

Post photo by J. Reed

Post photo by J. Reed

N-Ren-Faire3-Chamber-photo“Saturday, with the weather being better than the other two days, we had at one time about 325 people in the park,” said Hopkins. “Some people came back all three days of the event. With people coming and going and no admission it is hard to get a total number of attendees, so we can only go with how many were there when we did a head count.” About 15-20 vendors and entertainers took advantage of the opportunity to camp in the park.

The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce and Cedar Springs Renaissance Faire Committee are grateful to all who volunteered their time and contributions to make it an awesome event.

Post photo by J. Reed

Post photo by J. Reed

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Brewing Company buys Liquor Hut building

Post photo by J. Reed

Post photo by J. Reed

By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs Brewing Company is taking shape at the southwest corner of Main and Maple Streets, and they now also own the building next door, formerly the home of Liquor Hut.

According to David Ringler, construction is on schedule—the structural masonry is complete and the steel framing is in place this week. “It’s been fun over the past couple of weeks to watch all the activity,” he said. “We should be seeing the walls and complete enclosure shortly and the flooring is scheduled for early July, followed by the start of equipment installation.”

Ringler said their brewhouse is custom designed and currently in fabrication locally in Belding, by Digital Fabrication, in partnership with Psycho Brew. “This is their first large system, but we wanted to work locally if possible, rather than commissioning a system from elsewhere,” he explained.

The company closed on the deal to purchase the neighboring building at 81 N. Main a few weeks ago. Ringler said they had offered to buy the building from Walker Liqours six months ago, but could not come to an agreement. About six weeks ago, those discussions started again.

Walker Liquors maintained their retail package liquor license, but the store is permanently closed. “They are still in the process of removing some of their equipment this week and we will begin further clean up of the building in the coming weeks,” said Ringler. “We don’t have any firm plans in place for the building, as our priority is getting the brewery and restaurant open, but we are seeking a retail tenant for the front space that will complement our project.”

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Local principal to umpire College World Series

Michael Duffy has been umpiring for college baseball since 1985.

Michael Duffy has been umpiring for college baseball since 1985.

Michael Duffy

Michael Duffy

 

By Judy Reed

This last week has been a dream come true for Cedar Trails principal Michael Duffy. After a 30-year love affair with umpiring college baseball games, he is finally officiating at the College World Series, in Omaha, Nebraska, which began last Saturday, June 13.

Duffy, who umpires for the Big Ten, Mid-American, and Big East Conferences, began umpiring college baseball in 1985, for smaller colleges. But his roots go much deeper. He played Little League as a boy, and then began to umpire Little League games when he was a high school baseball player. After graduation, he umpired high school games.

In 1985, he was approached by Terry Bocian, Athletic Director at Aquinas. “I knew Terry, and he said he needed an ump for just one game,” explained Duffy. But he was hooked. “It became a love affair,” he said.

Duffy at first umpired for smaller colleges, like Aquinas and Grand Rapids Community College. He’s been doing the Big 10 since 1995. “My mentor, Bruce Doane Jr., took me under his wing, showed me the ropes, then said you are ready to go out on your own,” he recalled.

What does Duffy like about umpiring? “I’ve always been a sports enthusiast. At first, I needed to make some money, but I loved being around sports and the competition. After awhile, I realized that ‘Hey, I’m pretty good at this.’ Then other people started to notice my skill level. It’s really just a thrill to be a part of it,” he said.

This year, Duffy umpired 42 Division 1 baseball games, which take place on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The Post asked Duffy how that worked with his job as principal at Cedar Trails Elementary. “The school has been really good about it. Cedar Springs allowed me to restructure my contract so that I work less days,” he explained.

Duffy has been working hard to get to the College World Series. Over the years he has worked several NCAA Division I Regional Tournaments and one NCAA Division I Super Regional Tournament. He has also worked NCAA Division II, III, and JUCO Regional Tournaments. He has also umpired three baseball high school State Championships. With all that on his resume, there was still one thing they wanted him to do to reach the College World Series: take off a few pounds. Duffy did that, and this year, he finally got the call.

While Duffy didn’t have his schedule when we talked last week, he said that people could recognize him by the number he will be wearing—22. He got to choose his number, and it was a heartfelt decision. “My favorite number is 12. I wore it in school as a quarterback, and in baseball. But I decided the number to choose was #22—to honor the person who has sacrificed the most—my wife, Deb. That was her number in school, when she played softball,” he explained. “So with thankful thoughts, I chose 22.”

Duffy will be in Omaha through June 25. The series started on Saturday, June 13.

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