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The Post travels to Bay City

Steve Reed holding up The POST in front of the Pride of Baltimore II. Photo by Judy Reed.

Steve Reed holding up The POST in front of the Pride of Baltimore II. Photo by Judy Reed.

The Post recently traveled to Bay City, Michigan, with Steve and Judy Reed, of Cedar Springs, for the Tall Ship Celebration. Festival-goers were able to tour 11 different tall ships from various time periods and countries, as well as take part in other festivities on the grounds.

In the photo above, Steve stands in front of the Pride of Baltimore II, a replica of a 19th century Baltimore Clipper originally named the Chasseur. The topsail schooner gained fame as a privateer during the war of 1812. According to the Tall Ships website, “in a daring voyage to Great Britain, her captain declared a solo blockade of the British Isles. This caused the British Admiralty to call vessels back to the British Isles to protect their merchant ships. Chasseur captured or sank 17 vessels before returning home in 1815. Upon her arrival in Fells Point, she was greeted by cheering crowds and dubbed the Pride of Baltimore.”

Thanks for taking us with you on your expedition!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Scout project helps Bellowood dog rescue

Austin Anderson (center) and friends Jacob Swinehart (left) and Andrew Watts (right) recently completed projects at Bellowood Dog Rescue to help Austin earn his Eagle Scout rank. The fence behind them and Welcome sign were two of the projects. Photo by J. Reed.

Austin Anderson (center) and friends Jacob Swinehart (left) and Andrew Watts (right) recently completed projects at Bellowood Dog Rescue to help Austin earn his Eagle Scout rank. The fence behind them and Welcome sign were two of the projects. Photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

Austin Anderson loves his rescue dog. So when it came time to pick out a project to help him earn his Eagle Scout rank—the highest rank in Boy Scouts—he was inspired to give back and do something to help a local dog rescue. With some help from his mom, he chose Bellowood Dog Rescue in Cedar Springs.

Because of his generosity and help from his friends, family and local businesses, the Bellowood welcome center has a freshly painted fence, new welcome sign, and 20 specially crafted dog bowls.

“I am so thankful,” said Kim Schreuder, the founder of Bellowood. “The boys did a great job.” She explained that the Welcome Center is a place where people come to meet the dogs they want to adopt, so it’s important that it look nice.

Austin, the son of Dean and Kristine Anderson, will be a senior next year at Cedar Springs High School. He and his friends, sophomore Jacob Swinehart and junior Andrew Watts, paid a visit to Bellowood, and Schreuder showed them around and explained what projects needed to be done. They then chose what they wanted to do.

The boys also designed and made dog bowls to help dogs with megaesophagus.

The boys also designed and made dog bowls to help dogs with megaesophagus.

The dog bowls were made to especially help dogs with megaesophagus—a condition that is an enlargement of the esophagus, a muscular tube connecting the throat to the stomach. Dogs with that condition have a harder time moving food and liquid down to the stomach. According to Pet MD, some breeds, such as wire-haired terriers and miniature schnauzers can be born with it. Other breeds prone to the condition include German shepherds, dachshunds, great Danes, Irish setter, Labrador retriever, pug, and Chinese shar-pei. With the new bowls, they are up high enough that the dogs will be able to swallow their water and food much easier.

The boys created their own dog bone design from scratch, and made 10 large bowls and 10 small ones. “They are much better quality than the plastic ones you can buy in the store,” remarked Schreuder.

The scouts, with some help from parents, also cleaned, scraped, sanded, and painted the front fence, and created a new welcome sign. The materials were either bought at cost, donated, or paid for with gift cards from local businesses.

“I am so very very thankful for all their hard work and what they gave to us,” said Schreuder. “It’s such a blessing! They are great kids.”

Austin said he now needs to turn in his paperwork as the next step toward getting his Eagle Scout rank. His friend Jacob Swinehart previously achieved his Eagle Scout rank with work on the Kent Theatre.

“I’m so happy to be a part of this, and thankful,” said Schreuder. “It’s fantastic. I think it’s special that the boys do things like this—not just for me, but for others in need, too.”

On their last day there, the boys got to play with some of the rescue dogs up for adoption. (See photo). For anyone interested in adopting one of these or another rescue dog, contact Kim Schreuder at xbellowoodx@yahoo.com, or visit their page on www.petfinder.com.

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Wolverine Skyhawks dazzle crowd

Jase “the Ace” Dussia entertained the crowd with his skillful flying of his remote-controlled aircraft. Here it’s hovering not far off the ground. Photo by J. Reed.

Jase “the Ace” Dussia entertained the crowd with his skillful flying of his remote-controlled aircraft. Here it’s hovering not far off the ground. Photo by J. Reed.

It was a beautiful evening Monday to enjoy the Wolverine Skyhawks remote-controlled airplane show, an annual event with the Cedar Springs Library’s summer reading program.

Oohs and ahhs were heard from the crowd, who gathered at the club’s field on West Street and were treated to a great show, along with hotdogs, chips and water.

All the club pilots are skilled at flying their beautiful planes, but one pilot especially dazzled the crowd—16-year-old Jase “the Ace” Dussia, from Otsego. Jase is an XFC (Extreme Flights Championships) 3D Aerobatics champion and has been flying since he was seven years old. He flew two different planes and showcased his skill with some tricky maneuvers—dancing, swooping, and much more.

Kerissa Basso, 14, was the winner of the remote controlled airplane system given away by the Skyhawks. Pictured (from L to R): Skyhawks Club Treasurer Rick Steinport, CS Library Youth Services Miss Heidi, winner - Kerissa Basso, and Skyhawks Club President Eric Pipenger. Photo from the Wolverine Skyhawks facebook page.

Kerissa Basso, 14, was the winner of the remote controlled airplane system given away by the Skyhawks. Pictured (from L to R): Skyhawks Club Treasurer Rick Steinport, CS Library Youth Services Miss Heidi, winner – Kerissa Basso, and Skyhawks Club President Eric Pipenger. Photo from the Wolverine Skyhawks facebook page.

The club also gave away a remote controlled airplane system, and the lucky winner was Kerissa Basso, 14.

About 150 people were at the event, with 53 kids ages Kindergarten through 12th grade entering the raffle for the plane.

According to Library Director Donna Clark, this year’s Summer Reading Program has been wildly successful with 1,031 people signed up. “In year’s past we always seem to exceed 700, 749 tops. This year we have 734 kids and 297 adults! I believe it’s because we have the finest summer program around and the excitement of a new library,” she said.

The Summer Reading program has had 25 programs crowded into 6 weeks.

The grand finale to the program will be next Wednesday, July 27, at Morley Park, from 2-4 p.m., when they have their Super Fit Field Day Reading Celebration. Prizes will be given away for reading, and the Mounted Police will also be there. Plan to come out for a great celebration!

Also, anyone interested in seeing more of the Wolverine Skyhawks in action, can stop out a the field at the end of West Street on Wednesday evenings, when the club is there to fly their aircraft.

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Man charged in Montcalm crash

Joel Ibarra

Joel Ibarra

The crash occurred May 1, when Ibarra attempted to pass multiple vehicles in his black Audi and struck an elderly couple’s Buick head-on.

The crash occurred May 1, when Ibarra attempted to pass multiple vehicles in his black Audi and struck an elderly couple’s Buick head-on.

A Wyoming, Michigan man has been charged in the crash that killed an elderly couple from Grand Rapids on May 1, in Montcalm County.

According to the Montcalm County Sheriff Department, Joel Ibarra, 26, of Wyoming, was arrested late Monday afternoon in connection with the crash that killed Raymond and Mary Wrona, both 88, of Grand Rapids. The crash occurred on May 1, about 7:18 p.m., on M-66, near Schmeid Road, in Belvidere Township.

The Wronas were traveling soutbound in a red 1999 Buick LeSabre, when Ibarra tried to pass multiple northbound vehicles in his 2012 black Audi. Ibarra could not complete the pass in time, and the vehicles collided head on, on the west shoulder of the road.

Raymond Wrona, the driver of the Buick, was transported to Kelsey Hospital, where he later died. His wife, Mary, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Ibarra and his passenger, Maria Mancha, 28, from Comstock Park, were both transported to Kelsey Hospital and treated for their injuries.

Ibarra was arraigned on four charges—two charges of operating while under the influence of a controlled substance causing death and two charges of reckless driving causing death. Ibarra is currently out on a $35,000.00 bond.

Each charge carries a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison.

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Hawks fall on Saturday, still clinch playoff spot

Brant Brooks celebrates after scoring a touchdown in the second quarter. Photo by Marcie Crouch.

Brant Brooks celebrates after scoring a touchdown in the second quarter. Photo by Marcie Crouch.

By Shae Brophy

With the top spot in the MLFA’s Big Eight division on the line, the West Michigan Hawks hosted the Toledo Thunder on Saturday evening at Skinner Field. The teams shared identical 4-1 records coming into the game, and a win for either team would put them in the drivers seat for the top seed in the division.

A tough, hard fought game saw the Thunder come out on top with a 12-7 victory. After returning the game’s opening kickoff 99 yards to the one-yard line, Toledo opened the scoring with a one yard scamper on the game’s first play from scrimmage. After missing the extra point, the score remained 6-0.

The Hawks responded late in the second quarter, when Brant Brooks hauled in a five yard pass for a touchdown from quarterback Charles Manny Hodges. The extra point gave the Hawks a 7-6 lead, which they took into halftime.

Toledo was able to answer early in the third quarter, regaining the lead on a 26 yard touchdown run. Their two-point attempt was stuffed by the Hawks, keeping the score at a reasonable 12-7 margin.

With the score still the same late in the fourth quarter, the Hawks got the ball back at their own nine-yard line with just over a minute remaining. A big play brought them out to the Toledo 45-yard line with 24 seconds left, but a holding penalty and the subsequent 10-second run off put the Hawks in a tough spot, with the ball on their own 45-yard line and seven seconds remaining. On the final play of the game, they completed a long pass down field, but they were not able to find the end zone. Overall, Toledo outscored West Michigan by a margin of 393-242.

Cornerback Omar Haynes finished the game with three interceptions for the Hawks, while linebacker JaVon Welch had 12.5 tackles.

Despite the loss, the Hawks still clinched the franchise’s first appearance in the playoffs as a result of losses from other teams across the league.

“I thought we played a solid football game,” said head coach David Lange. “We missed a few opportunities to take the lead, but overall I thought we adjusted nicely. All we can do is look to the next game.”

The Hawks will be in action again this Saturday at Skinner Field when they host the West Michigan Force. Tickets are $6 a piece, with children eight and under free. The Hawks will be raffling off numerous items from local businesses, such as pizza from Hungry Howies and Vitale’s, gift cards to KC’s, and much much more! We hope to see you there!

FROM OWNER DAVID LANGE:

“An incident occurred in the stands of Saturday evening’s West Michigan Hawks game. Members from the West Michigan Force attended the game to scout our team before our game against them this upcoming weekend. I’d like to personally and formally apologize to the fans who witnessed this incident. The actions from these players were unacceptable, and will not be tolerated by the Hawks or Skinner Field. The Force were reprimanded by the league for their actions, with eight of their players being suspended for this weekend’s game. I have also ensured that there will be a heightened police presence at the game, and a security presence on the field. Our fans and the safety of our fans is our highest priority when we play at home, and we have taken steps to ensure that the integrity of the upcoming game will be of the highest quality.”

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That’s for the birds

Photo by Mary Lou Fuller

Photo by Mary Lou Fuller

Mary Lou Fuller, of Solon Township, sent us this cute wildlife photo. She said she put out some leftover popcorn for the birds, and it appears that the rabbit is patiently waiting and wondering if the cardinal is going to give him any! Thank you for a great photo, Mary Lou!

If you have a wildlife photo you’d like to send to the Post, email it to news@cedarspringspost.com. Include some info about the photo, your name, what city/township you live in, and how to contact you.

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Save money and water while enjoying a beautiful garden

BLOOM-Rain-Barrel-photo-credit-Gardeners-Supply

Rain barrels are making a comeback as droughts, watering restrictions and storm water runoff are on the rise. There are now many attractive rain barrel options to choose from. Photo courtesy of Gardner’s Supply Company.

By Melinda Myers

Too much or not enough water and never when you need it seems to be a common lament of gardeners. Reduce the impact of these weather challenges while conserving water, saving money on water and sewer bills, and growing beautiful gardens with the help of rain barrels. These century old devices are making a comeback as droughts, watering restrictions and storm water runoff are on the rise.

Contact your local municipality before getting started. Some communities have regulations and guidelines for using rain barrels and many offer rebates to homeowners who install them.

Start your conversion to rain barrels one downspout at a time. You can capture as much as 623 gallons of water from 1,000 square feet of roof in a one-inch rainfall. This can be a lot to manage when first adapting to this change of habit. Taking little steps allows you to successfully match the use of rain barrels to your gardening style and schedule.

Make your own or purchase one of the many rain barrels on the market. Regardless of which vessel you choose there are some features to consider when adding a rain barrel to your landscape.

Make sure the top is covered to keep out debris and mosquitoes. Or select one with a solid lid and opening just large enough to accommodate the downspout.

Look for one with a spigot low on the barrel, so water does not stagnate at the bottom. Use the spigot to fill watering cans or attach a hose. Elevate the barrel on cinder blocks or a decorative stand for easier access and to increase water pressure.

Make sure there is an overflow outlet to direct excess water away from your home’s foundation. Or use it to link several barrels together, increasing your water collecting capacity.  A downspout diverter is another way to manage rain barrel overflows. When the rain barrels are full this device diverts the water back to the downspout where it is carried away from your home’s foundation.

And the good news is you don’t need to overlook beauty for function. You’ll find many attractive options in a variety of shapes and sizes in garden centers and online catalogs such as Gardener’s Supply (gardeners.com). Some include a recessed top for storing accessories or growing a potted plant. You’ll find ones with decorative finishes that mimic a basketweave, fine terra cotta, or wood. Those with a flat backside like the Madison rain barrel fit right next to the house, saving space.

Rain water is naturally softened and free of flouride and chlorine; great for plants. Do not use rain barrel water for drinking, cooking or your pets. Avoid concerns of contamination from roofing materials and debris by only using the water for ornamental plants.

Maintenance is easy. Check for and remove twigs and debris that may collect and block the flow of water. Clean the inside of the barrel at least once a year with an environmentally friendly detergent. Those in cold climates need to drain the rain barrel and cover the opening or turn it upside down for winter storage. Make sure to divert the water away from the house once the downspout is disconnected.

Don’t worry about mosquitoes. Covering the opening with a fine screen and using the water on a regular basis will minimize the risk. Or use the eco-friendly bacterial agent Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) that kills mosquito larvae, but is safe for pets, people and wildlife.

Now is the time to start putting rainwater to work for you and your garden. Look for convenient locations for collecting and using rainwater from the roof of your home, shed or garage. A little effort put in now will result in benefits for years to come.

Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books. Myers’ website is:  http://www.melindamyers.com/www.melindamyers.com.

 

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Free cats at Animal Shelter

 

ENT-Free-cats1Spayed/neutered, microchipped, vaccinated and ready for a new home! 

Beginning Wednesday July 20, 2016, the Kent County Animal Shelter (KCAS) is offering free adult cats (over four months old) for adoption. Kittens under four months are available for adoption at half price. Qualified adopters will only pay $20 compared to the normal price of $40 for kittens. This offer is good through close of business Friday July 22. To apply, potential adopters simply need to come the Kent County Animal Shelter, provide photo identification with a current address, and fill out an adoption form. Normal KCAS adoption guidelines will remain in place. Shelter personnel will verify with landlords of those adopters who rent that pets are accepted in their homes.

ENT-Free-cats2All of the cats currently available for adoption have already been spayed or neutered. Shelter staff test all adoptable cats for Feline Leukemia and FIV. Every cat is also up to date on all vaccinations, has been microchipped and has received a flea treatment. “These are good and loving pets,” says Dr. Christopher Buckley DVM, staff veterinarian at KCAS. “For whatever reason, we just have too many of them right now, and we want them to find good homes.”

The Kent County Health Department reminds people that the health benefits of pet ownership are well known. According to a University of Minnesota study, cat owners were 30 – 40 percent less likely to die of cardiovascular disease than non-cat owners. The study also found benefits from lower stress, lower blood pressure and increased life span.

The Kent County Animal Shelter is located at 740 Fuller N.E. in Grand Rapids. The shelter is open Monday through Friday 9:30-1 and 2-6:30. Interested media can call for b-roll and interview appointments.

The pictures attached are of cats that were actually available for adoption as of Tuesday. Feel free to use the photos with courtesy to the Kent County Animal Shelter in any way you see fit.

The offer for free cats expires when the shelter closes on Friday July 22. More about our adoption program can be found at www.accesskent.com/Health/AnimalControl/animal_adoption_program.htm

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Fire at campground does $110,000 in damage

Photo courtesy of Dan Johnson.

Photo courtesy of Dan Johnson.

By Judy Reed

N-Fire3-pole-barn-and-RV

The fire at Lakeside Camp Park started in this pole barn. Photo by J. Reed.

Several area fire departments battled a structure fire Monday, July 11 at Lakeside Camp Park on White Creek Avenue, just south of 17 Mile Road.

According to Solon Fire Chief Jeff Drake, they were dispatched to the fire at 1:11 p.m. It started in a pole barn and spread to an RV next to the barn. He said it also damaged a utility truck and melted some of the siding on the brand new house that owner Rich Lupico had just built this spring.

Cedar Springs Fire, Algoma Fire, and Kent City Fire provided mutual aid at the scene.

Drake said that a park worker discovered the fire in the pole barn where he had been working. The man’s wife had a medical event due to the fire, and needed medical attention at the scene. Some saw this and thought a firefighter had been injured, but no firefighters were injured while fighting the fire.

The fire spread from the pole barn to an adjacent RV. Photo by J. Reed.

The fire spread from the pole barn to an adjacent RV. Photo by J. Reed.

Drake said that they believe the fire started in a southern wall of the barn. But they did not yet know a cause. “We know an electrical storm moved through prior to the event. But nothing has been ruled out,” he explained.

He said they plan to dig into and investigate the fire more this week to try to determine the cause.

Drake placed damages at $110,000, which included the barn, equipment, RV, and siding on the house.

Lupico told the Post that he used the barn as his maintenance shop. “This is pretty devastating. I lost a lot of stuff in that barn,” he said.

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City, Solon celebrates library groundbreaking

The groundbreaking of the new Cedar Springs Library took place Saturday, July 9 at the corner of Main Street and W. Maple. Photo by J. Reed.

The groundbreaking of the new Cedar Springs Library took place Saturday, July 9 at the corner of Main Street and W. Maple. Photo by J. Reed.

Library Director Donna Clark was one of several speakers at Saturday’s event. Photo by J. Reed.

Library Director Donna Clark was one of several speakers at Saturday’s event. Photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

Residents, community groups, and city and township officials from Cedar Springs and Solon Township came together Saturday, July 9, to celebrate the groundbreaking for the new Cedar Springs Library at the corner of Main and W. Maple Street.

Many local officials were on hand for the ceremony, including (but not limited to) Kent County Sheriff Larry Stelma, interim Cedar Springs City Manager Barb VanDuren, new City Manager Mike Womack, Mayor Jerry Hall, and Solon Township Supervisor Bob Ellick.

Library board member Tony Owens emceed the event.

The ceremony opened with the pledge of allegiance, led by the American Legion Color Guard. Several officials made remarks, including a passionate speech by Library Director Donna Clark.

“I’m only one, standing on the foundation prepared from the 1800s to this present day by a long line of educators, professionals, town folk, volunteers – enthusiastic people of vision and hope,” remarked Clark.

She pointed out that significant events had taken place in the library’s history both 80 years ago, and 100 years ago.

“It is noteworthy that the Clipper Girls used their printing presses and their enthusiasm to spearhead a millage campaign for stable funding for the Cedar Springs Community Library, and it passed in 1936 during the Depression—80 years ago.”

She also said that 100 years ago, in 1916, the old Congregational Church, which stood on the NE corner of Beech and 2nd Streets, was purchased by the town and was used as a community center for several years. After the building was purchased, a library was established in the tower rooms and Una Hopkins was the first librarian.

And now, 100 years later, in 2016 we are building to move from 2,016 sq ft to a new facility of 10,016 sq ft.

“Our goal is to make the Library a central hub, providing an open environment to enhance access to the world of knowledge through mentoring, networking and collaboration, and to provide quality resources for personal growth and lifelong learning,” said Clark.

She mentioned many of the people who had dreamed of a new library, but did not live to see it happen—Mike and Alice Holton, Jim Charon, Ronny Merlington, Niels and Edna Andersen, Jack Clark, and others. “We thank them for their vision, determination and generosity, so important to us today.”

She also thanked many of the others helping on the project, including members of the Community Building Development Team.

After the speeches, several people from area boards moved dirt with the golden shovels provided by Nugent Builders, the builder on the project.

According to Duane McIntyre, who has volunteered hundreds of hours on the library project, work on the library should start the week of July 25.

The Library is phase 1 of the building of the “Heart of Cedar Springs.”

A concert by Mane Street was held after the groundbreaking, just west of the site, where the new amphitheater is expected to be built in another phase of the project.

To find out ways you can help the Library with fundraising, stop in or give them a call at 696-1910.

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