web analytics

Archive | Featured

Residents enjoy Community Night

N-Community-night1-Cheshire-cat-web

Cedar Springs Public Schools Fine Arts night was part of Community Night this year. Post photo by J. Reed.

Community Night, put on by the Cedar Springs Community Action Network, was back this year after being canceled due to severe weather last year. Residents, businesses, school groups, and other non-profits came together last Thursday, at Cedar Springs High School, for the 27th annual Community Night.

Area businesses and non-profit groups rented tables to showcase their business or group to residents. And this year there was a new twist—Cedar Springs Public School students were able to showcase their talent to a broader audience with the

Businesses and non-profit groups showed the community what they have to offer at the annual Community Night last week.

Businesses and non-profit groups showed the community what they have to offer at the annual Community Night last week. Post photo by J. Reed.

addition of fine arts night. There was student music, drama and art from students of various ages.

It was a great night to see what’s available in Cedar Springs and the kind of talent our students have!

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

It’s finally here

N-Flower-Doyle-Barnes-webWe’ve been waiting a loooong time for spring—and it seems to have finally arrived. With spring comes fresh blooms, and we were glad today to see this crocus photo from Doyle Barnes Jr., of Courtland Township. Thanks so much for sending this photo to brighten our day!

We would love to see your flowers and wildflowers, too—email photos with some information to news@cedarspringspost.com. Put the word “flowers” in the subject line.

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Cedar Creek cleanup this Saturday

N-Cedar-Creek-cleanup-garbage-promoIt’s not too late to participate in the annual Cedar Creek Cleanup/Earth Day Celebration in Cedar Springs.

The 7th Annual Celebration will be held on Saturday, April 26, from10:00 a.m. until noon. The city will give away commemorative t-shirts to the first 50 participants who register for this event. Meet at the Fire Barn at W. Maple and Main on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. to receive their clean-up assignments and shirts. Pizza will be available at noon for all participants.

An e-waste collection trailer, staffed by Cedar Springs Rotarians, will also be available behind City Hall from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., for anyone wishing to dispose of electronic waste, including computers and old televisions.

The City of Cedar Springs Police Department will conduct an auction of surplus items, including 15 bicycles, beginning at 1:30 p.m.

Registration forms are available on the City of Cedar Springs website at http://www.cityofcedarsprings.org. Pre-registration is not mandatory to participate in the cleanup. However, it will allow them to assign clean-up locations ahead of time as well as purchase trash bags and pizza.

Please call 696-1330 with any questions.

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Post travels to Mexico

N-Post-goes-to-Mexico-web

The Argall family—April, Randy and Ethen—went to Cozumel, Mexico on a Disney cruise for Ethen’s 7th birthday. Ethen was born with dysphagia (a swallowing disorder) and his goal was to eat by mouth. If he achieved the goal, he would go on the Disney cruise. And he did it! Great job, Ethen!

The family said it was in the 70s and 80s and sunny every day. They stopped at Costa Maya, Grand Cayman Island, and Castaway Cay Island.

“If you have the chance to take a family trip, this was great,” said April. “There were a lot of family things to do off and on the ship. And it was the number one cruise ship to be on in 2014.”

N-Post-goes-to-Mexico2-webThanks for taking us with you on your Disney cruise!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Trout Unlimited receives funds to restore Cedar Creek

N-Cedar-Creek-Trout-Unlimited-web

Cedar Creek will benefit this summer from restoration activities funded through a federal grant by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

According to Nichol DeMol, with Trout Unlimited, Cedar Creek, which is a tributary of the Rogue River running through downtown Cedar Springs and emptying into the Rogue River near 12 Mile and Friske Road, is important to the overall health of the Rogue River. This tributary is a significant source of cold groundwater to the river. This groundwater provides stable coldwater rearing for juvenile trout and summer shelter for adult trout when the Rogue River gets warm.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recognized the importance of this stream, and has awarded Trout Unlimited over $27,000 for restoration activities as part of the Rogue River Home Rivers Initiative project.  This funding is provided through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the National Fish Habitat Partnership-Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership.

In collaboration with the City of Cedar Springs and private landowners, Trout Unlimited will plant trees and other native plants on stream banks, provide localized cattle access, fence out cattle along a portion of the creek, and construct in stream habitat structures. 

The on-the-ground restoration is scheduled to begin in the summer of 2014. Volunteers will be needed to assist with this work. If you would like to volunteer or want to know more about the Rogue River Home Rivers Initiative project please contact Nichol De Mol at 231-557-6362 or ndemol@tu.org.

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Clever tips and tricks to save on auto insurance

CAR-Tips-and-tricks(BPT) – Car insurance can take a bite out of your budget. On average, consumers shelled out nearly $800 for auto insurance for each vehicle in 2011, according to a recent report from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. In some states, the annual cost to insure one car topped $1,100.

To cut insurance costs, the first thing to do is talk to your agent. Your agent can tell you about discounts and other painless ways to reduce your premiums, says Charles Valinotti, a senior vice president with insurer QBE North America.

“Insurance companies reward drivers for behaviors that reduce risk,” Valinotti says. “But you have to ask your agent which discounts and savings apply to your situation. You may be surprised to learn the number of ways you can lower your premiums.”

For example, if one of your teenage drivers earns As and Bs in school, you may be eligible for a good student discount, Valinotti says. You may also be eligible for a discount if your son or daughter attends college more than 100 miles from home, and does not have a car at school.

Other ways to save include:

* Owning two or more cars and covering them on one policy.

* Owning a vehicle that’s outfitted with safety equipment like anti-lock brakes, air bags or a security system.

* Having a passive anti-theft device, such as a “smart” chip embedded within a car key.

* Paying the full cost of the premium up front.

* Safe driving. Keep your driving record accident-free for 36 months.

* Buying your auto and homeowners, renters or condominium insurance from the same company.

Whatever you do, don’t cut corners with coverage. While it may be tempting, it is best not to buy a policy that offers bare bones coverage. A savvier way to save money would be to increase your deductible, Valinotti advises.

“Rather than buying minimal coverage, think about increasing your potential out-of-pocket cost if you have an accident,” Valinotti says. “If you can handle it, raising your deductible can lower your premium without reducing the amount of coverage on your vehicles. Your agent can tell you exactly how much you’ll save in premiums by choosing a higher deductible policy.”

Don’t focus strictly on cost when choosing an insurer. A company that offers auto insurance at rock bottom prices may not be your friend if it takes forever to handle claims. Do your homework on a company’s record of claims service before you buy coverage.

 

 

 

Posted in Auto Life, FeaturedComments (0)

Wrestlers place at nationals

Blake Peasley takes national championship title

 

S-Wrestling-Nationals-264-webWest Michigan Pursuit thought that the MYWA State Finals would be their last tournament of the season but we have some wrestlers who were not ready to end their season quite yet. There is the National United Wrestling Association for Youth (NUWAY). This competition typically brings the top 8 wrestlers from each state to compete. WMP brought five grapplers to compete and all five brought home a coveted All American Status Title.

“I have a core group of kids who can’t get enough wrestling. Looking forward to training these young kids during the off season and start out strong next year, said Owner and Head Coach, Dave Andrus.”

Luke Egan, a first year wrestler, is six years old and attends Cedar Trails here in Cedar Springs! Luke wrestled the 49 lb wt class and finished taking 7th Place in the nation with a season record of 57-9 and eight Championships under his belt. Olivia Male, a fourth year wrestler, is 10 years old and attends Cedar View here in Cedar Springs! Olivia wrestled the 70 lb wt class in the USAW Women’s Nationals and finished taking 6th Place in the nation with a season record of 23-23 and two Championships under her belt. Jayden Marcano-Cruz, a first year wrestler, is five years old and attends East Elementary in Grandville. He wrestled the 43 lb wt class and finished his season taking 4th Place in the nation with a season record of 37-8 and seven Championships under his belt. Brocke Fisher, a fourth year wrestler, is 11 years old and attends Rockford middle school. Brocke wrestled the 60 lb wt class and finished his season taking 3rd Place in the nation

with a final record of 19-9 and five Championships under his belt. Blake Peasley, a second year wrestler, is six years old and attends Lakes Elementary in Rockford. He wrestled the 58 lb wt class and finished his season taking home a National Championship Title and giant eagle trophy. Blake is our only West Michigan Pursuit grappler who remained undefeated the entire season with a record of 36-0 and fourteen Championships under his belt. Congratulations to all of our Pursuit of Champions!

If you are interested in obtaining more information about West Michigan Pursuit, please come check us out. We are located in the Cedar Springs Sports Plex and practices are on Tuesday and Thursdays from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

Wildfire season is here

This wildfire started a house on fire in Nelson Township 5 years ago last week.

This wildfire started a house on fire in Nelson Township 5 years ago last week.

Wildfire prevention week April 20-26

 

Most of Michigan’s wildfires occur in the spring – April, May and June. According to the Department of Natural Resources, which is responsible for wildland fire protection on 30 million acres of state and private land, April is when wildfires start becoming a problem. During the state’s annual observance of Wildfire Prevention Week, April 20-26, the DNR reminds the public about the dangers of wildfires.

“One out of three wildfires in Michigan is caused by someone burning debris who did not take proper precautions or obtain a burn permit,” said Paul Kollmeyer, resource protection manager within the DNR’s Forest Resources Division. “Many people look outside and think the snow and spring rains have taken the edge off the wildfire danger.”

That’s not the case, Kollmeyer said.

“The dried leaves, needles and brown grass from last year are still there. When the weather is warm, folks want to get out and clean up their yards. They don’t realize that all it takes is one strong wind gust catching an ember to ignite a wildfire.”

Kollmeyer said this is why planning is so vital before a match is even lit.
A person is required to get a burn permit prior to burning brush and debris in Michigan. Residents in the northern Lower Peninsula and Upper Peninsula can obtain a free burn permit by www.michigan.gov/burnpermit. Residents in southern Michigan should contact their local fire department or township office to see if burning is permitted in their area.

In addition to obtaining a burn permit, the DNR recommends people take the following steps to reduce the risk of wildfire to their home and property:

Clear leaves and other debris from gutters, eaves, porches and decks. This prevents embers from igniting your home.

Keep your lawn hydrated and maintained. Dry grass and shrubs are fuel for wildfire. If it is brown, cut it down to reduce fire intensity.

Remove fuel within 3 to 5 feet of your home’s foundation and out-buildings, including garages and sheds. If it can catch fire, don’t let it touch your house, deck or porch.

Remove dead vegetation surrounding your home, within the 30- to 100-foot area.

Wildfire can spread to tree tops. If you have large trees on your property, prune them so the lowest branches are 6 to 10 feet high.

Don’t let debris and lawn cuttings linger. Chip or mulch these items quickly to reduce fuel for fire.

When planting, choose slow-growing, carefully placed shrubs and trees so the area can be more easily maintained.

Landscape with native and less flammable plants. For more information about making fire wise landscaping choices, visit www.firewise.msu.edu.

“Be safe and smart when it comes to fire,” Kollmeyer said. “Fire prevention is everyone’s responsibility.”

For more tips in safeguarding your home and property from wildfire risk, www.michigan.gov/preventwildfires.

 

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

Tips for a Bountiful Backyard Garden

SPR-Tips-for-backyard-garden1

(Family Features) The benefits of having your own backyard vegetable garden are plentiful, and can include significant lifestyle impacts, such as healthier eating habits, money saving perks and more.

A Relaxing, Healthful Hobby

Looking for a hobby that allows you to contribute to the health of your family? Take up gardening. Beyond producing nutritious foods, it can help you teach your family about local agriculture, all while basking in the tranquility of the great outdoors. Though starting your own home garden can be intimidating, there are a few simple steps to get you started. Once developed, it can yield fruits and vegetables from early spring and into the fall.

1) Do Some Research

Find out what vegetables grow best in your area and when is the right time to plant and harvest. Many local university extension programs have this information readily available online. For each plant, consider the amount of water needed, how much sunlight is required and if it should be started from seed or a transplanted seedling.

SPR-Tips-for-backyard-garden22) Choose a Good Spot

Keep in mind vegetables need at least six hours of sun each day, so plant away from the shade of buildings, trees and shrubs. Planting close to your house may make you more likely to bring your harvest right into your kitchen, and will help you remember to weed and water. Including rain and irrigation, your garden needs at least one inch of water per week. Make sure you can easily access a water supply nearby. Some products, such as an Ames NeverLeak hose reel, provide convenient hose storage and can easily reach all parts of your yard. Be sure to choose a level area of your yard so when watering it will not pool in lower areas.

3) Clear the Area

Use your garden hose or a string to mark the area for proper placement of your garden. Use a sod lifter or garden spade, keeping the area level and removing as little topsoil as possible. Next, use a round point shovel, such as the True Temper True American Round-Point Shovel, to dig into the soil about 12 inches, breaking it up and removing clumps. To encourage proper drainage and escape light freezes in early spring and fall, construct a raised bed by creating a border with wood slats and filling in with soil.

4) Prepare the Soil

Use a rake to create a smooth finish and remove debris or stones on the surface. You may want to add manure, compost or soil additives to provide additional nutrients in the soil.

5) Plant Your Seeds

Determine if you will be starting your plants from seeds or transplanting small seedlings. Be sure to research how much room each plant will need and plot the layout of your garden. Dig V-shaped furrows using a warren hoe or the edge of a garden hoe. Carefully distribute the seeds in the furrows evenly and in accordance with the instructions on the seed packet. Cover the seeds and pat down gently, then water thoroughly.

Use this information for a fruitful harvest this gardening season. For more tips, visit www.AmesTrueTemper.com or www.Facebook.com/TrueTemperTools.

 

Posted in Diggin' Spring, FeaturedComments (0)

Spring takes area by storm

 

The Cedar Springs Post took a direct hit when winds blown in by a fierce spring-turned-winter storm ripped through our area last Saturday.

Owner and Publisher Lois Allen received several calls at her home about it. “The Post is under attack!” said one caller. And indeed, the Post was in the path of destruction as the high winds lifted the roof of Len Allington’s brick building on the corner of Main and Maple Streets and sent it airborne across the alley between the buildings. It landed on top of the Post, wrapped around a utility pole and entangled in electrical wires.

Consumer’s Energy cut the wires on Sunday and left the scene, leaving three businesses and several apartments without power until Tuesday afternoon.

“The more you depend on technology, the more helpless you become when it fails,” said Allen. “You can quote me on that.”

What many people thought was a tornado turned out to be straight line winds. The first storm rolled into our area at about 4:30 p.m. and was followed by several others throughout the night.  The National Weather Service said damage across West Michigan was consistent with winds gusting 75 to 85 mph, and lasted 3-5 minutes. The winds were equivalent to an EF-0 tornado on the Enhanced Fujita Scale.

The winds blew in, and hail rained down, damaging cars, mobile homes, and other outside objects. The size ranged from a dime to a quarter. Some mobile homes were pelted with hundreds of holes. It covered the ground to a depth that looked like snow.

Trees were ripped out of the ground or broken all across the area—Sand Lake, Cedar Springs, Sparta, Kent City, and surrounding townships. The wind even blew the roof off of the gymnasium at Kent City.

In the aftermath of the storm, rivers and creeks were swollen and many areas are still under a flood watch.

Thanks to the many readers who sent us your storm photos!

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

advert

LOCAL Advertisers

Tri County Body Shop

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!