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Sand Lake 4th of July Celebration

Independence Day is a time to celebrate our freedom and Sand Lake has all the activities and events for a fun filled family weekend. Starting Thursday, June 30th through Monday, July 4th, 2016 come out and enjoy some of the great events including the Firemen’s Parade of Lights, Kiddies Day “The Spirit of Freedom” with Kids parade and activities, book sales, carnival rides, live music, die cast car races, a greased pig contest, antique car and tractor show, Grand Parade, demolition derby, bingo, FIREWORKS and MORE…

AmericanFlag-hometownhero

Download the Sand Lake 4th of July Celebration schedule below…

SandLake4thCelebration.pdf

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Featured, NewsComments (0)

Coming soon — a new library

This rendering shows the new Cedar Springs Library building.

This rendering shows the new Cedar Springs Library building.

The building contractor will be chosen on Monday, June 27, which means building should begin sometime in July. The project is estimated to take 6-8 months, and cost just under $2 million.

The Library Board, Community Building Development Team (CBDT), and the City of Cedar Springs collaborated to make this lifelong dream come true. The vision of the Library Board, the drive of the CBDT, the support of City Council, and thousands of hours given by many people from our community, have made this extraordinary effort a reality.

One of the final approvals needed was from the DEQ. That approval came through this month. This had been a major hurdle because the Cedar Creek and attendant wet lands run through the ten-acre project site, now being referred to as the Heart of Cedar Springs, where the library building will be constructed.

Between Maple and Pine Streets, on the northwest side of town, ten acres is being developed, which will include the new library building, an amphitheater, a boardwalk along the Creek, with rain gardens and sculptures, a community building and a recreation/fitness center. Complementary to this Town Square development, the White Pine Trail and the North Country Trail will intersect right here in Cedar Springs.

N-Library2-and-heart-of-city

In The Post last fall, the Library Board announced a fundraising opportunity for people local to Cedar Springs. While several folks have already participated, there are still bricks—available in two sizes—4”x8” for a donation of $50 and 8”x8” for a donation of $100. Bricks will be engraved with the name or message of your choice and will be used to pave the walkways into and around the Library.

In addition, there are a very limited number of retaining wall blocks available for a donation of $1,000 each as well as capstones for a donation of $2,000 each.  Retaining wall blocks and capstones, about 36 inches high, will have an inset engraved metal plaque to recognize donors, as individuals, organizations, or businesses. The donation may also be in honor or in memory of someone.

Over $3,000,000 has already been raised towards the whole ten-acre project—the Heart of Cedar Springs. A good portion of those funds have been designated to the new library building, and unless otherwise designated, all donations will be directed to the Cedar Springs Community Library until it is completely and totally funded. At that time donations will be directed towards other parts of the Town Square project.

“We want to take this opportunity to thank all donors and volunteers for their dedication to make this dream come true for Cedar Springs,” said Community Building Development Team chair Kurt Mabie. “It has taken years of planning by the Library Board, the City of Cedar Springs, the Community Building Development Team and various sub-committees to get to this point. We are now hoping that others in our Community will step up to the challenge and help make all of this possible.”

All gifts are tax deductible.  Both the CBDT and the Library are non-profit organizations.  The CBDT is a 501 (c) 3 and the Library is a 170 (c) 1. Checks should be made out to the Community Building Development Team and sent to the treasurer of the CBDT, Sue Mabie, at 15022 Ritchie Ave, Cedar Springs, Michigan, 49319

To obtain the forms for donating towards a brick or a block, you may call Donna Clark, Director of the Library, at 696-1910 or email her at ceddc@llcoop.org.  Checks for these fundraisers should be made out to the Cedar Springs Community Library. General contributions will be recognized inside the Library.

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Rogue River Green team returns to improve watershed

From left to right: Intern DeAnna Clum, students Liam Gardner, James Olsen, Max Homrich and Claire Gault visiting a garden in Grand Rapids.

From left to right: Intern DeAnna Clum, students Liam Gardner, James Olsen, Max Homrich and Claire Gault visiting a garden in Grand Rapids.

Be on the lookout this summer for eight local high school students working in their community to protect its water resources. Through a program with Trout Unlimited’s Rogue River Home Rivers Initiative, the Green Team of students are spending their summer learning about the Rogue River and creative ways to manage its major pollutant—stormwater runoff—with green infrastructure.

Rockford High School students Max Homrich and James Olsen installing a rain garden for a property owner on Rum Creek.

Rockford High School students Max Homrich and James Olsen installing a rain garden for a property owner on Rum Creek.

The June team, comprised of Liam Gardner, Max Homrich, James Olsen, and returning member Claire Gault, are led by local landscaper and native plant specialist Georgia Donovan. During their four weeks, the students will be working on public and private lands to install and maintain rain gardens, bioswales, and other native landscaping techniques in Rockford, Cedar Springs, and Sparta.

In addition to field work, the students will be working with their partner Green Team downstream in Plaster Creek—taking classes at Calvin College, working in the greenhouse with Plaster Creek Stewards, and meeting professionals in the environmental field for valuable job training. Although many of the students hope to pursue a career in aquatic ecology and biology, the knowledge they are gaining through this experience will help them make good decisions as a citizen of the planet in every aspect of their life.

If you see the Green Team working on riparian buffers to Rum Creek in Rockford, or planting a rain garden by CS Tool Engineering in Cedar Springs, or landscaping Sparta Area Schools’ campuses with native vegetation, be sure to say hi and thank them for their efforts to protect the Rogue River across the watershed.

The Green Team is supported by a grant through the Environmental Protection Agency.

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The Post travels to Washington D.C.

Marckini shakes hands with Roberto Rodriguez, Deputy Assistant to the President for Education Policy.

Marckini shakes hands with Roberto Rodriguez, Deputy Assistant to the President for Education Policy.

School Board Trustee Joe Marckini recently traveled to The White House, in Washington D.C., to advocate for our Cedar Springs Public Schools.

Mr. Marckini met with Roberto Rodriguez, Deputy Assistant to the President for Education Policy.

Trustee Marckini is passionate about serving the students and citizens of Cedar Springs and is a champion for public education throughout our nation.

Thank you, Joe, for advocating for our school district, and for taking the Post with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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PTSD: Not Just a Veteran’s Illness

HEA-PTSD-despairBy Mary Kuhlman, The Michigan News Connection

LANSING, Mich. Almost 25 million people in the United States are living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, according to the support group PTSD United. That includes thousands of Michiganders who have suffered a traumatic event, from crimes or natural disasters to events surrounding military service.

The diagnosis is only part of seeking help, said Dr. Matthew Friedman, senior adviser at the Veterans Administration’s National Center for PTSD.

“On the one hand, there are resilient people who meet the full diagnostic criteria for PTSD, but they can cope with the symptoms,” he said. “Then, there are other people for whom PTSD is completely debilitating.”

Friedman said treatment has advanced to include cognitive behavior therapy and medication that can help people work through their illness. While it’s normal to experience stress after a traumatic event, Friedman said you should seek professional help if it lasts longer than three months, disrupts home or work life, or you find yourself reliving the event frequently and experiencing flashbacks.

“We really want people to recognize that they’ve got PTSD and, if they’re not sure, they should see a professional who can help them sort that out—and if they do, then we have treatments that work,” he said. “People who think they have PTSD, or their loved one has PTSD, should seek treatment.”

The annual cost of anxiety disorders to society is estimated to be significantly more than $42 billion, often due to misdiagnosis and undertreatment. This includes the costs of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric medical treatment and prescription drugs, plus indirect workplace costs and mortality costs.

More information is online at ptsd.va.gov.

Posted in Featured, HealthComments (0)

Five top trends in container gardening

BLOOM-Five-top-trends(BPT) Gardening is a peaceful activity that eases tension, reduces overall stress and promotes longevity. One long-term study found that daily gardening reduces the risk for both dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. With all of these benefits, there are ample reasons why people of all ages and lifestyles should start digging in the dirt.

You don’t need a big yard or lots of room to enjoy a beautiful garden. With so many options for indoor and outdoor container gardening, there’s no limit on the number of gardens you can have. Container gardening is a great way to color up a small space, add depth and height to your yard or easily change up the look of your patio. No matter your skill level, enjoy the benefits of gardening with these container trends:

Foliage gardens

Foliage plants are no longer just accessories for your small space garden. You can create an entire display simply out of rich, colorful foliage plants. Fountain grass, papyrus, vinca and grassy rush are all great additions for adding vibrancy to your container garden. Mix and match with various textures to find a unique display that speaks to you.

Petunia tower

A petunia tower is a great way to add an unexpected element to your container garden collection. A flower tower is easy to make and sun-loving Tidal Wave Petunias will bloom all season long on a patio, deck or pool area. You will need only three Tidal Wave plants. The Red Velour have great color and texture and make a strong statement. Plant them with good potting soil into a 10 to 12 inch wide plastic nursing pot. Place a three-foot metal tomato cage into the pot. The cage should be as wide at the bottom as it is on the top. Now slip the entire plastic pot into a glazed pot that’s about one to four inches wider, and voila!

Hanging baskets

Hanging flower baskets bring your plants to eye-level, where everyone can enjoy their wonderful scents and sights. Add beauty to an otherwise dull porch, wall or rafters. Try planting succulents for a virtually care-free container garden. Petunias, calibrachoa and pansies also make wonderful additions to hanging baskets.

Combination containers

Who says your container garden can only have one plant? Get creative and play with different color and texture combinations of plants and flowers. You can make up your own mix or search online for combo recipes by other inspiring gardeners. Mix foliage with flowers and use a color scheme to build a balanced and beautiful container.

Indoor container gardening

Take your favorite hobby inside. Even if you have a small apartment, there’s no need to rule out house plants. Find the best place for each plant, depending on their light requirements. Don’t be afraid to experiment and try different locations until you find the best spot for your indoor containers. For sun-loving plants, just be sure to place them on a windowsill for maximum light exposure.

With so many options and room for creativity, container gardening is a trend that’s here to stay. Tap into your inventive side to build a container garden that brings joy and wellness both indoors and out. For more gardening ideas, tips and tricks visit wavepetunias.com.

Posted in Bloomin' Summer, FeaturedComments (0)

State urges travelers to leave firewood at home

Perfectly round exit holes, just smaller than a dime, in tree limbs and trunks can be a sign of Asian longhorned beetle infestation. Photo courtesy of Joe Boggs, Ohio State University, Bugwood.org.

Perfectly round exit holes, just smaller than a dime, in tree limbs and trunks can be a sign of Asian longhorned beetle infestation. Photo courtesy of Joe Boggs, Ohio State University, Bugwood.org.

As the summer travel season begins, the Michigan departments of Agriculture and Rural Development and Natural Resources remind vacationers to leave firewood at home to prevent the spread of invasive tree insects and diseases.

Hauling firewood from one part of the state to another is a common way for these destructive pests to move to new locations, which could be devastating to Michigan’s native trees. The emerald ash borer already has wiped out millions of ash trees across the state. High-impact diseases, including oak wilt and beech bark disease, now are making their way through Michigan – often helped by travelers with trunkloads of wood harboring unseen fungi that can spread to healthy trees in new areas.

The fungus that causes oak wilt is visible under the bark of this split log.

The fungus that causes oak wilt is visible under the bark of this split log.

“Visual inspection does not always reveal disease or insect damage in wood,” said Gina Alessandri, MDARD’s Pesticide and Plant Pest Management Division director. “Disease may be in an early stage, and insect larvae can be hidden under bark. The safest choice is to burn firewood at or near the location it was harvested.”

Travelers are encouraged to buy firewood at their destination, burn it all on-site and not take it home or to their next destination. In most public and private campgrounds, firewood is available on the premises or from nearby firewood vendors.

It is a good idea to purchase firewood within a short distance of where it will be used. For ease in finding a local vendor, use www.firewoodscout.org. For day trips that include a cookout, bring charcoal or a cook-stove instead of firewood.

In- and out-of-state quarantines limit movement of regulated wood items to prevent the spread of invasive species and tree diseases. In Michigan, it is illegal to transport hardwood firewood in violation of the MDARD EAB Quarantine.

“It’s recommended that travelers do a little firewood homework before their trip,” said Jason Fleming, chief of the Resource Management Section in the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “Many out-of-state visitors live in areas under quarantine for pests such as thousand cankers disease or Asian longhorned beetle, and it is illegal to move any regulated items (including items such as firewood and wood chips) from quarantined zones out of those states and into Michigan.”

Quarantines for Asian longhorned beetle include areas of New York, Massachusetts and Ohio. The Asian longhorned beetle is not known to be in Michigan, but the public is asked to look for signs of this invasive beetle, including round, 3/8-inch-diameter exit holes in tree trunks or limbs. Asian longhorned beetle larvae feed on a wide variety of tree species including maple, birch, elm, willow, buckeye, horse chestnut and other hardwoods. The damage caused by Asian longhorned beetles ultimately will destroy an infested tree.

Anyone observing an actual beetle or a tree that appears to be damaged is asked to report it. If possible, capture the beetle in a jar, take photos, record the location, and report it as soon as possible through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Asian longhorned beetle website, www.asianlonghornedbeetle.com or contact MDARD at 800-292-3939 or MDA-info@michigan.gov.

More information on the Asian longhorned beetle and other invasive forest insects and tree diseases can be found at www.michigan.gov/invasivespecies. Select the “take action” tab to learn more ways to avoid transporting invasive species during the recreation and travel season.

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

Summer car care tips to stay in great condition

For better driving all season long, make sure your summer to-do list includes cleaning and maintaining your car. Photo (c) Rukawajung — Fotolia.com

For better driving all season long, make sure your summer to-do list includes cleaning and maintaining your car.
Photo (c) Rukawajung — Fotolia.com

(StatePoint) For many drivers, the summer is the time of year when your tires hit the pavement most, and car care doesn’t take a vacation. Be sure your car is ready for all that mileage.

“A car that`s well-maintained is safer, cheaper to run, more reliable and can be worth more money at resale time,” says Brian Moody, executive editor of Autotrader.

To help, Autotrader editors are sharing “Simple Summer Car Care Tips”” tips to get your car in tip-top shape for the busy driving season ahead:

• Wash and wax your car thoroughly. If you can afford it, have it professionally detailed. Direct sunlight can cause a car’s finish to become dull, but a thorough washing and waxing can also help keep your car’s paint and clear coat looking good.

It’s tempting to run the car through an automated car wash, but those big revolving brushes can dull the finish over time. If you’re not allowed to wash your car at home due to regional laws or neighborhood rules, seek out a good drive-thru wash and hand wax instead.

• Check and set your car’s tire pressure to the level specified in your owner’s manual or on the driver’s door sill. As temperatures warm up, the air in your tires can expand and that might impact the way the car handles.

Be sure not to over-inflate the tires. While low tire pressure can cause the tire to heat up if it’s not rolling down the road properly, extreme over inflation can cause a blowout in high temperatures. If you’re not comfortable doing this yourself, take your car to a shop like Big-O Tires, Sears Auto Center or Firestone Auto Care Center. Those kinds of chains will usually do it for free.

• Have a qualified mechanic do a visual inspection under the hood. If you’re comfortable doing this yourself, check for worn belts or hoses and make sure your coolant (sometimes called anti-freeze) isn’t too old. Coolant lasts a long time, but keeping track of when it was last changed, especially in older cars, can help you avoid overheating as the temperatures gradually climb.

For more tips for keeping your vehicle in great shape visit www.Autotrader.com

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Posted in Auto Life, FeaturedComments (0)

Three hurt in rollover crash

This pickup truck rolled Friday morning, June 10, injuring the female driver and two young passengers. Post photo by J. Reed.

This pickup truck rolled Friday morning, June 10, injuring the female driver and two young passengers.

Three hurt in rollover crash

A woman and two children were sent to the hospital on Friday morning, June 10, after their truck rolled on 17 Mile in Solon Township.

The crash occurred shortly before 10:30 a.m., in front of 1750 17 Mile Road, east of Lime Lake Rd. According to Joshua Roney, of Kent City, he was heading westbound on 17 Mile in his Ford F350 pickup, and was turning left into the driveway, where he works, when another pickup behind him tried to go around him and clipped his back bumper. “She was going way too fast,” he said.

The other pickup then rolled.

The call came into 911 saying passengers had been ejected. According to the Michigan State Police, a young female passenger, Gabby Olvera, 9, of Kent City, was ejected. The other two, driver Debbie Monroe, 58, of Sparta, and a young male, Gustafo Olvera 10, were not ejected.

According to Lt. Chris Paige, with Solon Fire and Rescue, the female driver, grandmother of the two children, was transported to the hospital by Rockford Ambulance with serious injuries, and the two children were transported with non-life threatening injuries.

The Michigan State Police said that the Monroe was cited for being unable to stop in an assured clear distance.

Assisting the MSP at the scene was the Kent County Sheriff Department, Solon Fire and Rescue, Algoma Fire and Rescue, and Rockford Ambulance.

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Get on your mark, get set, READ!

Animals from Double K Farm are always a hit at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program at the Cedar Springs Library. Courtesy photo. Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

Animals from Double K Farm are always a hit at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program at the Cedar Springs Library. Courtesy photo.

Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

The Cedar Springs Public Library was on fire with enthusiasm Monday, June 13, as the Library kicked off its spectacular Summer Reading Program. The clouds and brief rain could not dampen the spirits of the 625 participants of this community affair. Families made their way to the Library from noon to 6 p.m. to sign up for a summer of fun, reading, great programs and prizes. Themed book bags, compliments of ChoiceOne Bank, for K-12thgrades, were filled with reading logs and books, as patrons made their way out to the yard to climb aboard Fire Truck #8 and the Rescue Squad vehicle, get free ice cream donated by Classic Kelly’s Restaurant, purchase books from the Friends of the Library book sale, pet the animals from Double K Farm and interact with Animal Junction 4H students.

Community Partners were out in force for the day to assist –members of various businesses, Cedar Springs Fire department volunteers, teen volunteers, and parents working together with Library staff to make the day memorable. Already 753 children and adults have signed up, a new record for opening week.

Over $400 was taken in Monday as raffle tickets were sold to add to the $500+ already sold. A Stihl Blower and Trimmer, valued at over $700, and donated by Bill Shallman, Manager of Weingartz of Cedar Springs, were placed on display at Independent Bank and chances to support the building of the new Cedar Springs Community Library actively promoted by bank staff. Winners at the end of the day were Kenneth Kent, blower, and David Twining, trimmer. Kenneth bought 2 tickets and David $5 worth of tickets. I guess you really never know—it really could only take one ticket to win!

The new library was proudly displayed all day at the event. The brick, windows, roof—the outside make-up of the library was chosen last month by the Library Board, so the new rendering of the library was complete a few weeks ago. Library staff have been shared it enthusiastically to everyone! On June 27, the Library Board will vote on the building company who will get the contract to begin construction sometime around mid-July. Library staff had a great time telling families that next year we will have our summer reading program in our new library.

If you haven’t signed up, get on over to the Cedar Springs Library and sign up for over 35 great prizes and Wednesday weekly programs, plus 25 other special programs to happen for ages 8 through adults. Preschoolers have special programs on Fridays at 11:15 a.m. on the Library grounds, as well. For more information and a calendar of events, go to the Library’s website:  cedarspringslibrary.org. Follow our summer reading theme, Fitness and Nutrition. “On Your Mark, Get Set, READ!”

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