web analytics

Archive | Featured

A new chapter begins

Conceptual rendering of front and side view of Cedar Springs Brewing Company.

Conceptual rendering of front and side view of Cedar Springs Brewing Company.

Cedar Springs Brewing Company breaks ground

By Judy Reed

Dozens of people turned out this week to witness something that hasn’t happened here in downtown Cedar Springs in a long time—a groundbreaking for a brand new business at the corner of Maple and Main Street.

Excitement was in the air Tuesday, October 14, as the Cedar Springs Brewing Company ceremoniously broke ground.

“It was a lot of fun and I was tremendously encouraged by the wonderful turnout for the event,” remarked owner David Ringler.

On hand to give remarks was John Wheeler of Orion Construction, Mike Corby of Integrated Architecture, Jason Parker of Choice One Bank, Mark Fankhauser, Mayor of the City of Cedar Springs, and 73rd District Representative Peter MacGregor, who said Rep. Rob VerHeulen couldn’t be there and so he was representing them both.

Groundbreaking at Cedar Springs Brewery Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014.

Groundbreaking at Cedar Springs Brewery Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014.

MacGregor, who has been instrumental in helping with legislation regarding craft brewing, said it’s a win-win for the craft brew industry, which keeps growing. “They’ve figured out that if we offer a great product, they will come. And it’s also a win-win for the agriculture industry with the products that are used. So, it’s a win-win for the state, and another reason for people to stop here in Cedar Springs,” he said.

The brewery is expected to be complete in the spring of 2015. Orion Construction began site work after demolishing the existing building earlier this fall. “We have a few housekeeping issues still in progress, including the completing of our environmental reports and some organizational issues, but we’re beginning the physical construction as soon as possible, with hopes to have the outside shell enclosed before the weather slows us down,” explained Ringler.

The project involves new construction of a 5,700 sq. ft. steel, brick and glass building, along with an outdoor biergarden, providing a beautiful environment along the White Pine Trail trailhead in Cedar Springs. The site is oriented to provide room for future growth of the brewery. The design features large windows allowing for natural light in the dining facility, along with both traditional American and traditional European-style seating. The concept is intended to complement the surrounding buildings on Main Street and provide a gateway to the north for future growth. The exterior treatments (international-style flags, signs and open-air spaces) are designed to attract visitors and become a focal point of Main Street.

Cedar Springs Brewing Company's biergarden.

Conceptual rendering of the back view of Cedar Springs Brewing Company’s biergarden.

The brewery/restaurant will feature a variety of craft beers, focusing on German styles along with a full food menu, in-house made spirits, wine and non-alcoholic beverages. Ringler (a.k.a “Director of Happiness”) lived in Germany for four years where he apprenticed with local brewmasters. After leaving Germany, Ringler continued his brewing education at the renowned Seibel Institute of Brewing Science in Chicago. In 2013, Ringler began the formal process in Cedar Springs and received all permits and approvals to proceed. “This project is the result of a near 25-year dream,” said Ringler. “Our final approval was both a relief and a thrill. This is the culmination of a long process and the start of another. We’ve been encouraged by the wonderful support we’ve received from the town of Cedar Springs and we are ready to serve this community upon completion of construction.” Ringler added that he believes with continued support of the local community that this project will serve as a catalyst for future growth, development and jobs in Cedar Springs.

“We know there are many excellent brewers in Michigan and we look forward to being a part of that. We’ve done a lot of research into the atmosphere, menu and experience most craft beer fans hope for when visiting a brewpub. We are confident in our understanding of our audience and we are proud of our entire menu. We hope locals and visitors will love Cedar Springs Brewing Company and we are honored to have the support of Cedar Springs as we move forward,” said Ringler.

 

 

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

The Post travels to Zimbabwe

Esther Couturier at the orphanage in Zimbabwe.

Esther Couturier at the orphanage in Zimbabwe.

By Esther Couturier

This summer a life long dream recently turned into reality for me when I was able to travel to Zimbabwe, Africa. Since I was 12, God has been cultivating a desire in me to someday live in Zimbabwe. I have continued to believe that despite my circumstances, and of not knowing how it would happen, that one day God would provide a way for me to travel to Zimbabwe.

God orchestrated this through my meeting a young man, in my church, who was visiting from Zimbabwe last summer. He invited me to stay with his family. I was able to travel to Zimbabwe on May 31 and stayed for eight weeks! It was the best eight weeks of my life, so far.

While I was there, I took the Post on many adventures, from reading to children in an orphanage, decorating cupcakes with foster children, helping feed the elderly and visiting a Government Hospital. We also visited Gonarezhou National Park, where we saw hippos and rhinos. At a game reserve we rode elephants and petted a lion. We also experienced Jackal hunting, hiking Victoria Falls, and white water rafting on the Zambezi. We also toured a butchery and shopped at the flea markets.

My favorite part of the trip was staying on a farm. Besides enjoying the absolute beauty of the place, I also enjoyed vaccinating mombes (the word for cows in Shona—Zimbabwe’s native language), riding motorbikes, and teaching at the school. I helped teach math to eight-year-old children and English to 14-year olds. I also climbed gomos (mountainous terrain), and I talked with many of the employees, who helped teach me Shona.

Everyone I met along the way was exceptionally nice. The families I stayed with are very relational and enjoy talking over tea and rusks. I really loved just listening to everyone’s stories. Some tell of just the hardships in the past, others tell of hope for restoration, while most tell of both. There are so many different aspects and cultures in Zimbabwe. Life is different there. Even though there are power outages daily, lack of variety in food and supplies, potholes galore along with insane driving, and a corrupt government, I loved every bit of it!

God answers prayers and He fulfills His promises. He is a God who has a plan for everyone’s life, because He formed us and loves us. I know without a doubt I will return to Zimbabwe. The vision God has placed in my heart is not yet fully fulfilled.

Thank you to everyone who supported me, prayed for me and encouraged me. I hope to continue to share this journey.

I was not able to, or had forgotten take photos with the Post everywhere I went, but it was in my back pack everywhere I traveled.

Thanks, Esther, for taking us with you on your adventure!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Cedar Springs man among those honored by DNR

 

Pictured here are just four of the more than 40 hunting education instructors statewide honored for 40 years of volunteer service. Pictured (L to R) are DNR Director Keith Creagh; instructor James Johnson, Houghton Lake; instructor John Seelman, North Muskegon; instructor David Hansen, Cedar Springs; instructor Joseph Primozich, Pentwater; and DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler.

Pictured here are just four of the more than 40 hunting education instructors statewide honored for 40 years of volunteer service. Pictured (L to R) are DNR Director Keith Creagh; instructor James Johnson, Houghton Lake; instructor John Seelman, North Muskegon; instructor David Hansen, Cedar Springs; instructor Joseph Primozich, Pentwater; and DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler.

DNR honors longtime hunter education instructors for volunteer service

For nearly 70 years, Michigan has conducted hunter education classes, teaching new hunters firearms safety and the regulations behind having a safe and successful hunt. This year, the Department of Natural Resources has honored those longtime instructors who have been with the program more than 40 years with special recognition, including one from Cedar Springs. They have been honored at a series of Natural Resources Commission meetings.

“Our hunter education program has trained over 1 million hunters since its start in 1946 and currently trains about 20,000 students a year,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “We could not do this without the help of our hunter education instructors who volunteer because of their love of the outdoors and their deep interest in passing that interest along to the next generation of conservation leaders.”

There are at least 40 active hunter education instructors who have more than 40 years of service to the program, including Charles Duncan, of Bay City, who is the longest-serving instructor, having volunteered now for 49 years. Instructors honored at the Oct. 9 NRC meeting in Cadillac for their service include:

James A. Johnson, Houghton Lake (46 years).

John M. Seelman, North Muskegon (44 years).

David E. Hansen, Cedar Springs (44 years).

Joseph W. Primozich, Pentwater (43 years).

While having a crop of seasoned, veteran instructors is an advantage for Michigan’s hunter education program, there also is a need to recruit new instructors for the program in all regions of the state, said Lt. Andrew Turner, who manages the DNR’s Law Enforcement Division’s recreational safety program. “We greatly appreciate our veteran instructors who have been with the program for more than 40 years. If you have an interest in passing along your interest in hunting to new hunters, we need you in our program,” Turner said. “This is a great way to ensure that the sport you enjoy today is enjoyed by future generations of hunters.”

For more information on Michigan’s hunter education program, visit www.michigan.gov/huntereducation.

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

Playoff bound!

Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer dives into the endzone with the game-winning touchdown. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer dives into the endzone with the game-winning touchdown. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

 

Red Hawk MavRick Cotten brings down the ball carrier. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Red Hawk MavRick Cotten brings down the ball carrier. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks varsity football team pulled off a double coup Friday night, October 10, when they not only clinched a playoff berth with their sixth win, but also took over sole possession of first place in the OK Bronze.

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks brought a fearless work ethic to their match up with the Huskies of Forest Hills Northern. This game was anticipated to be an offensive brawl, with both teams averaging 40-plus points a game for the season. But things turned out to be completely different when both teams’ defenses showed up to spoil the offensive festivities.

The game began with a scoreless first quarter and an indication of how the entire game would play out. Both teams exposed their true identities, with the Huskies showing their spread offense air attack, and the Red Hawks bringing their red flannel, relentless, full house wing T.

By the end of the first half, the Red Hawks’ team determination established an 8-point lead that the Huskies players had to sit on through the course of their extended homecoming halftime show that was filled with corvettes and BMWs.

Lane Gott on the tackle for the Red Hawks. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Lane Gott on the tackle for the Red Hawks. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

To start the second half, the Huskies tied the game up through the air at the end of the third quarter leaving the score at 8 to 8 going into the fourth. This had every fan in the stadium, including our infamous 12th man—the camo-clad, Cedar Springs student section—on the edge of their seats and screaming for a win.

In the end, it came down to a fourth and inches play, after the Husky defense stopped the Red Hawks on the goal line on second and third down. Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer beat the Huskies’ defense to the end zone pylon to make the score 14 to 8, with just a few minutes to go in the game.

The Huskies then pulled out all the stops through the air and on the ground, in an attempt to keep their grip on the OK Bronze Conference title. Then came the final play for the Huskies, when the pass by Forest Hills Northern quarterback, Jake Martin, found the hands of Red Hawk defender, Collin Alvesteffer, which sealed the game for the Red Hawks!

Please join us for our 3rd Annual Pink game this Friday, October 17, when the Red Hawks face the Greenville Yellow Jackets at Red Hawk stadium at 7:00 p.m. Please come out and support your Red Hawks!

 

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

Cedar Springs Brewing donates to PTO

BUS-Brewing-company-donation

 

Cedar Springs Brewing Company said they are proud to support the Cedar Springs PTO’s Walk-A-Thon, scheduled for Friday, October 17. David Ringler, owner of the brewery, presented the PTO with a check for $300 on September 19.

More than 2,000 students, staff and volunteers participate in this walk-a-thon, a school-wide fundraising event celebrating health, fitness & education. Business sponsors help provide t-shirts for all the students that walk. The funds raised through walker pledges go directly to each school.

Posted in Business, FeaturedComments (0)

Fall clean-up tips for your lawn and garden tools

AWE-Lawn-care-tools

(BPT) – As the temperature drops, your lawn and garden will start settling into a dormant state. As you prep your landscaping and garden for a winter’s slumber, it’s a good idea to review the tools you used all summer. Taking care of this task now will ensure they’re in good shape come spring when it’s time to use them again. From sharpening edges of blades to making certain the tool is still doing the job it was designed to do, put all your lawn and garden tools through a thorough fall cleaning. Here are some tips:

* Lawn mowers – Check your owner’s manual for information about sharpening the mower deck blades and what to do with any unused gasoline before putting the mower into storage. It’s a good idea to keep the mower in a dry location where moisture won’t collect and potentially rust the blades.

* Hand trimmers – Hand clippers, tree trimmers and saws all take a beating during the summer. Check these tools to make certain the handles are still secure, the cutting blades are sharp and the locking mechanisms all work. If anything isn’t up to par, replace the tool so you have it ready for the first sign of spring.

* Chainsaws – These heavy machines get put through their paces, and they can be taxing on people, too, after extended use. If you’re ready to upgrade your chainsaw, the Husqvarna low-weight 436Li is quiet, easy to operate and has the same power as gas machines. The 536LiXP and the T536LiXP models are also available, and they come with low maintenance and high-performance delivery. All battery-operated chainsaws come with two rechargeable batteries that can be interchanged with any Husqvarna hand tools you might already have in your collection. The batteries have a 40-minute charge time, helping to keep the tools lightweight and quiet.

* Weed trimmers – These tools are invaluable for keeping the grasses and weeds trimmed around trees and garden edging. In the fall, be sure to replace the string so you’ll have a fresh spool come spring. Also check the air filter on the tool. If it is dirty, replace the filter to allow your machine to perform at its best.

* Hoses – When it’s time to store your hoses for the winter, check all the connections to make certain nothing leaks; replace the connectors if you notice water spraying or dribbling from a connection. And if the hose itself is leaking, put it on your list to be replaced. Make certain you’ve drained all the water out before putting the hoses away for winter. If you have a hose cart, roll up the hose neatly without any kinks. Otherwise, you can just roll the hose into a neat pile of loops for storage in a dry place.

With all of your lawn and garden tools safely stored for the winter months, you’ll know they’ll be ready the minute you need them in the spring.

 

Posted in Awesome Autumn, FeaturedComments (0)

Red Flannel rocks despite weather

 

This photo was taken by Natalie Kieda as she rode in the helicopter over the town on Red Flannel Day last Saturday.

This photo was taken by Natalie Kieda as she rode in the helicopter over the town on Red Flannel Day last Saturday.

 

 

Natalie Kieda won a complimentary helicopter ride on Red Flannel Day.

Natalie Kieda won a complimentary helicopter ride on Red Flannel Day.

By Judy Reed

 

The weather held true to the spirit of the Red Flannel Festival Saturday, with temperatures in the 40s. The nip in the air and the sporadic sprinkles didn’t put a damper on the festivities, however, as thousands of people lined the streets to celebrate the Red Flannel Festival’s 75th anniversary.

Helicopter rides were one of the highlights of the day, and the helicopter could be seen and heard buzzing over the town all day long. Courtland Township resident Natalie Kieda was one of the people who took advantage of the attraction. Kieda, who works at Cedar Springs Public Schools, said she won the ride as a door prize the school gave away.

“I really enjoyed it,” remarked Kieda. “I had never ridden in a helicopter before. I was a little nervous, but it was an amazing view. It was nice to see the town from the air.” She took some aerial photos, which she shared with us.

She said the helicopter took off from Red Hawk Elementary, went north of town, out over the highway, and circled back to Red Hawk. “It was a nice experience. A pretty smooth ride, too,” she added.

Events and attractions could be found all day, up and down Main Street, on side streets, at the schools, in Morley Park and up on 17 Mile in the Tractor Supply parking lot (the car show was there). People were able to take the trolley to various locations.

As usual, the Grand Parade was a big hit, with Cedar Springs TV production teacher Justin Harnden and crew filming a live lip dub production during the parade, and the Scottville Clown band entertaining at the end of the parade, and in a concert afterward. Activities continued on into the evening, with the Red Flannel Talent show, a movie at the Kent Theatre, a powder puff football game, and live music at the Grand Lodge and at the American Legion.

To see the lip dub, go to youtube.com and type in Red Flannel lip dub.

Many people submitted their Red Flannel photos to the Post Facebook page this week. We couldn’t fit them all in, but download this week’s Red Flannel Post and see if you can find yours!

N-RF-Helicopter3

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

The Post travels to Mt. McKinley in Alaska

N-Post-travels-Mt-McKinley-DickersonDavid and Loraine Dickerson, of Cedar Springs, went on a two-week vacation in June, with five of Loraine’s six sisters and their spouses. And of course, they took a Post along.

“The first half of our vacation started in Vancouver, on a cruise of the Alaskan Inside Passage,” wrote Loraine. “We enjoyed stops in Ketchikan, Juneau, and Skagway and ended at Seward. We were lucky to see an iceberg break off and fall into Glacier Bay.”

During the second week, they rode the Alaskan Railway and stopped at Anchorage, Talkeetna, and Denali. “Due to bad weather on the mountain, our first flight was cancelled,” explained Loraine. “We rescheduled and flew in a Talkeetna Air Taxi (a ten-seat plane) up to a glacier approximately 1/4 of the way up Mt. McKinley. We had to wear coats, sunglasses, and special boots.”

The photo above is of David and Loraine in front of the McKinley range. “We were able to see the top of McKinley several times while in Talkeetna and Denali, and joined the 30 percent club,” remarked Loraine. “Only 30 percent of the people who visit McKinley ever see the top. Alaska is a must-see destination!”

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

It’s Only a Barn

The old Stout horse barn, behind Solon Township Hall. Should it be torn down or the roof repaired?

The old Stout horse barn, behind Solon Township Hall. Should it be torn down or the roof repaired?

By Vicky Babcock

There is a controversy brewing—a decision to be made, studies to be done, directions to be given. At the heart is the Stout horse barn. Its fate is in your hands.

Tucked away behind the new Solon Township offices, at 15185 Algoma Avenue, the barn is easily forgotten, hacked away by the needs of progress—neglected for lack of funds.  Yet, this barn has a story to tell.

Is it a historic presence? If time is a factor in writing history, one could argue that it is not. In the scope of time it is a young relic, dating back only some 30-40 years. But if love, ambition, memories, events and dedication play a part, it is pure gold.

It was somewhere around 1971, when Leon and Billie Stout purchased the old Mactavish farm, the land where the stable now stands. They had raised horses before, but traded country life for the city when daughter, Katherine, was conceived. That all changed when Katherine caught the (horse) fever. At age 9, she began taking riding lessons through 4-H and, through her enthusiasm, the bug spread to the rest of the family. Before long, a 23,000 sq. ft. breeding and conditioning facility, Katherine’s design, was constructed; the Stout Barn was the culmination of a dream.

Built by Standard Lumber, the facility became one of the leading breeders of quarter horses in the area, spawning champions such as Smooth Speed, Smooth Splendor, Comet’s Chip and Liberty Jet Line. The stable became a hub of activity in its heyday, for both horses and horse lovers. It hosted pig roasts and music, 4-H and Mountie training and one memorable auction. There were cattle as well, though these were likely not housed in the stable. And there were visitors from around the world.

Leon did not come late to horses; he grew up with them. He owned his first horse at age nine and he bought and sold horses as a boy. At one time, he even built and owned his own race track, through the combined efforts of a group of friends and a bottle of whiskey, the price for grading the track.  The site was the host for the Red Flannel Derby in the late 50’s.

The farm had peacocks at one time, escape artists who wandered to the western edge of the property on a regular basis. The tail of the peacock is another story—ask the barn—it knows. It was there when the prize bull went through two fences to visit the ladies.

That bull, a favorite, was one of the Galloways that the Stouts raised, beginning with 30 head of registered cattle purchased from a neighbor. At auction, that number totaled around 500. The quarter horses, numbering around 65 at one count, were sold off privately for the most part. It was a sad day for the Stout family.

For the barn itself, it was the beginning of an end. No longer in the Stout hands, its new stewards fell behind on its upkeep. Hard times and the economic downturn have taken their toll. For a brief time, it earned its keep as a rental, housing other people’s horses.  But it was not enough. With no funds to put back into its upkeep, the Stout Barn, once young and proud, was losing its battle against the elements. Time and apathy became insurmountable barriers—its fate seemed inevitable.

When the property—less than half of what it once was—came up for back taxes, Solon Township picked it up with a new township office in mind. Under the township’s stewardship, the stable and arena has heard the laughter of children once again. Horses—Ford and Chevy, enjoyed respite from the sun’s relentless rays in its vast shadowed interior. Solon Market had its birth there, and continues to use the stable for events today. It has seen a wedding, and it has sheltered a camper and a wagonload of hay. It is available for storage now. And still its roof continues to decay. Without some necessary repair, this chapter of history will end.

Only a barn? Some say so. But listen with your heart and you’ll hear a child’s laugh, the call of a new foal, the gentle wicker of its dam, the challenge of its sire. You may see the vibrancy of a young girl with determination and spunk as she graciously speaks of her passion—and of her champion horse, Big Boy—and of her crown. There is joy here and pain, life and laughter, smiles and tears and memories of a lifetime. There is pride and potential and hope. So much hope.

Vicky Babcock is a resident of Solon Township.

 

The Stout Horse Barn awaits the Township’s decision to either repair the roof (which the insurance company has agreed to pay for) or to tear it down. The Township needs your direction. Tear it down? Repair the roof and look into viable uses for it? It’s your call. Please come to the next Township meeting on Tuesday, October 14, at 7:30 p.m. and voice your opinion.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Flu fighters: Busting six sickening flu myths

HEA-Flu-myths(BPT) – Ready for this year’s flu season? You may think you know a lot about flu prevention and treatment – but being wrong about the flu can make you downright ill. Here are six myths about the flu, and the truth behind them.

Myth 1: Cold weather will give you the flu.

Fact: Although flu cases commonly peak in January or February, and the “season” usually lasts from early October to late May, it is possible to get the flu at any time of year. During cold weather, people are inside in confined spaces for greater amounts of time. This, combined with bringing germs home from work or school, creates more opportunities for the flu to spread.

Myth 2: If you’ve had a flu shot, you can’t get sick.

Fact: It takes about two weeks for the flu vaccination to fully protect you, and you could catch the virus during that time, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since the flu vaccine protects against specific strains expected to be prevalent in any given year, it’s also possible for you to be exposed to a strain not covered by the current vaccine. Finally, the vaccine may be less effective in older people or those who are chronically ill, the CDC says.

Myth 3: Once you’ve treated a surface with a disinfectant, it is instantly flu free.

Fact: Disinfectants don’t work instantly to kill germs on surfaces. In fact, some antibacterial cleaners can take as long as 10 minutes to work. And they have to be used correctly. First, clean the surface and then spray it again, leaving it wet for the time specified on package directions. Anything less and you may not kill the flu virus, exposing yourself and others to illness.

If you’re including antibacterial cleaning in your flu-fighting efforts, look for a product that works much faster, like Zep Commercial Quick-Clean Disinfectant. Available at most hardware and home improvement stores like Home Depot, Quick Clean Disinfectant kills 99.9 percent of certain bacteria in just five seconds, and most viruses in 30 seconds to two minutes. To learn more, visit www.zepcommercial.com.

The flu virus can live up to 24 hours on surfaces such as counters, remote controls, video game controllers, door knobs and faucets. Use a household cleaner that disinfects to clean these high-touch surfaces to help prevent your family from spreading the cold and flu.

Myth 4: You got vaccinated last year, so you don’t need a shot this year.

Fact: Like all viruses, flu viruses are highly adaptable and can change from year to year. Also, the strains vary each year, so the vaccination you got last year may not be effective against the flu that’s active this year. In fact, it most likely won’t be effective. The CDC recommends that people who are eligible for the vaccine get a flu shot by early October.

Myth 5: You got the flu shot, wash your hands frequently and disinfect religiously – you’ve eliminated your risk of flu exposure.

Fact: We don’t live or work in sterile environments. Germs are brought home every day on items like messenger bags, cell phones, notebooks, shoes – even on your clothes. If someone in your home gets sick, or is exposed to someone with the flu, cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and discard the tissue in the trash right away. Wash hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Remember that germs spread through touch, so avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Myth 6: Getting the flu isn’t that big of a deal.

Fact: It could be. Last year was the worst flu season since 2009, the CDC said, and during the week of Jan. 6 to 12, 2013, more than 8 percent of all deaths nationwide were attributable to flu and flu-related pneumonia. In addition to making you miserable, flu can make existing medical conditions worse, lead to sinusitis and bronchitis and even pneumonia.

Bottom line: if you are not feeling well, avoid making yourself and others around you sick by staying home.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Featured, HealthComments (0)