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Archive | Church Connection

THOMAS D. HOVEY SR.

28C--obit-HoveyThomas D. Hovey Sr., age 86, of Sand Lake passed away Friday, July 8, 2016 at his home. Tom was born June 22, 1930 in Grand Rapids. Surviving are his wife, Linda (Kort) Hovey; children, Mary and Tom Vaugh, Tom Hovey Jr., Kim and Karen Hovey, Pam and Al Pike, John Rasmussen, Lisa and Bill Groot; 13 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild; sister, Marilyn Demerest; sisters-in-law, Jackie Kort, Judy Doxey and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by his daughter-in-law, Marcia Hovey; brother, Lee F. Hovey Jr.; his parents, Lee  and Petronella Hovey and in-laws, Pete and Phyllis Kort. Early on in life Tom’s interests revolved around racing. His first experience was at Bigelow Field in 1948 and a long career ensued in open wheeled racing. He was recognized as a fierce dirt track competitor at many Midwest tracks. He was an avid hunter with trips to Montana, Iowa, Canada and the Upper Peninsula. As a fisherman he loved the water. In the last ten years of his life he was happiest on their houseboat, “The Hardy Hilton” surrounded by friends and family telling funny stories which he did best. Tom worked many years as a truck driver and equipment operator, starting at Bishop Motor Freight with his dad and brother. Then he owned his own truck and worked for Reith Riley. He also owned Fun Spot Bowling Alley in Irons, Michigan and went to Central Alaska in 1980 where he gold mined and repaired heavy equipment. In 1992 Tom retired from Grand Valley Redi-Mix/Ottawa Aggregates. He then went back to work hauling dies for General Die until 1999. The family wishes to thank Spectrum Health Palliative and Hospice Care. A celebration of life will be held in the fall.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike, Cedar Springs, MI.

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Humility

Cedar-Christian-ChurchPastor Ryan Black

Cedar Springs Christian Church

340 West Pine Street, Cedar Springs

Throughout the history of mankind, pride and boastfulness has attached itself to the brashness of men. Most of us are likely guilty of this to some degree. Consequently, God tells us to turn away from this notion and seek to humble one’s self. Humility is what God desires as it acts as an opposite of pride. Humility does not mean thinking badly of yourself, or trying to hide your accomplishments. If you know a person who boasts and brags about his successes, or acts as if he were better than other people, you already have a view of what you should not do. No one wants to be around a person like this. In contrast, the person who is humble gives credit where it is due.

The Christian who practices humility begins by acknowledging God as the source of all that is good in their life.  If he gains a success, he knows he would not have accomplished it without God. When you experience something positive, be aware that God is the source of the wonderful blessing. Your awareness of God extends to knowing he would not even exist otherwise. A humble person will defer glory and credit to God, not boasting in his own self.

Humility extends to hard events in life, too. When you experience a loss or a difficulty, these are also times to acknowledge God. The strength and courage to continue during hard times come from knowing there is a reason for your faith. Knowing God will not let you down or leave you results in faith based on humility. When pressing on is something you know you cannot do alone, all you need to do is acknowledge God as the source of your strength.

To acknowledge God working all things for our good is one part of humility. Another part is to be thankful. Learning to be thankful is a good place to start in regard to humility. While it may seem easy to thank God for his gifts when you are going through a difficult time or experiencing something very positive, humility requires consistent gratitude. If you start by thanking God for your life and every new day, being humble will become natural for you. Pride will eventually give way to humility. It may not happen overnight. It may have to follow a painful process, because pride can be very, very stubborn. Like an embedded splinter deep in the flesh of your foot, it is hard to remove. You cannot remove it alone, and there is constant throbbing and pain until it is extracted. This is the plight of pride. Pain and suffering are its cohorts. Pride provides a false sense of security.

Humble yourself, and trust God to humble others. It is easy to recognize pride in others while it is still looming in your spirit. Run from spiritual pride. It is the worst kind. It is insidious. It is self-righteousness in nature, and it chokes the Holy Spirit. Humility grows in an environment of honesty, openness, prayer, and change. Be a change agent on behalf of the humble. Humble pride!

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George C. Allington

Allington, George military112

George C. Allington

Mr. George C. Allington, age 91, went home to be with his Lord and Savior on Saturday, July 9, 2016. George was born in Cedar Springs in 1925, he lived in Solon Township most of his life. George grew up on Lime Lake and attended Christian Hill School, and Cedar Springs Jr. High and High School. George joined the Army on April 12, 1944, served in the European Theater, and was wounded at the Battle of the Bulge on December 24, 1944. He received a Purple Heart, and the European Theater Ribbon with two Bronze Stars. He married Eldona “Donie” Louise Weller just before leaving for World War II, in August 1944. She preceded him in death in April of 2013. Upon return, they purchased a farm in Solon Township on Hanna Avenue and raised six children. George and Donie were married for 69 years. They operated a dairy farm for over 30 years. George also worked out at Rapistan, Sparta Foundry, Standard Oil, and Wolverine Brass in Grand Rapids until retirement. He was a charter member of the Pioneer Christian Reformed Church in Cedar Springs and served as a Deacon, Elder, and a Sunday School Teacher. After retirement, George and Donie served with Christian Reformed World Relief—now known as World Renew—and Appalachia Reach Out. On September 28, 2014 married Marilyn Baas and they had two happy years together. George is survived by his loving wife Marilyn, children, Dr. Richard (Dr. Ann McGill Franzen) Allington, Allen (HongXia) Allington, Len (Kimberly) Allington, David (Paula) Allington, Mary (Kim) Coonen, and Dale (Marcey) Allington. George was also blessed with 19 grandchildren, 35 great grandchildren, and 1 great-great grandchild. There will be a time of visitation on Tuesday, July 12, 2016 from 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00 PM. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, at 11:00 AM at Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford with Rev. Jacob Heerema officiating. Interment will be at Solon Township Cemetery under the auspices of the Kent County Veteran’s Honor Guard and the United State Army. Memorials to: World Renew, 1700 28th Street, Grand Rapids, MI 49508.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home

www.pedersonfuneralhome.com

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Where often is heard an encouraging word

Pastor Dick Nichols

Cedar Creek Community Church

2969 14 Mile Road, Sparta

 

The coming together with fellow Christians is stated in the scriptures as an act of mutual encouragement.  We read in the book of Hebrews, “And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds, not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching” (Hebrews 10:24-25, NIV).

When as Christians, we worship together, pray together, and in general work together as a community, it is as followers of Jesus Christ. Being a Christian is about belonging to a community of faith, a group that is called to build each other up, and encourage one another. One wonders why we would need to be instructed to be an encourager; why would Jesus need to teach his disciples and us about having compassion and a heart toward encouragement?

I think we can safely say that answer lies in the fact that this is against our very nature.  We are often self-centered and selfish, and if something doesn’t touch our lives or the lives of our family and friends, then it’s not our affair and we choose to stay uninvolved. That is why Jesus had to teach his disciples about being encouraging, and why we still need the lessons today.

Yet, if we just look around us, it is apparent that there is a lot of hurt and discouragement. Where is the church of Jesus? Where are we making a difference with a little compassion here and some encouragement over there?  One thing that I have discovered in my personal life is that most encouragement is one on one. Of course there is a great need for the corporate involvement in some cases, but by and large our opportunities to encourage others occur more spontaneously as we follow God’s leading through this life.

God gives us numerous illustrations of encouragement throughout his word, and in one instance we read of a Christian in the book of Acts (Acts 4:36), a man by the name of Joses, who was given the name of Barnabas. The name Barnabas was interpreted as “son of encouragement,” a nickname given him by the apostles, descriptive of his inclination to serve others and willingness to encourage wherever it was needed.

The root meaning of the word encourage simply means, “to put courage into.”  God has created us in his image as social beings, something we see throughout scripture as God is all about relationships, as indicated in his institution called the church. In Hebrews we also read, “But encourage one another daily, as long as it is called ‘Today,’ so that none of you may be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness” (Hebrews 3:13 NIV).

God gives each of us opportunities every day to show our love for one another and our care and concern and support for one another to be encouragers, not for our glory, but to display his love for others through us. It is through our connection with Jesus Christ that we are connected to one another and our common union with Him produces our union with each other.

Everyone can use a little encouragement on a regular basis. May God help us to be men and women more like Jesus—bold enough to reach out and touch a hurting world with encouraging (putting courage into) words and acts in Jesus’ name.

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MELVIN “JACK” HEISS

27C-obit-Heiss

Melvin “Jack” Heiss, 89, of Cedar Springs, passed away peacefully on Friday, July 1, 2016 with his family by his side. Jack was born September 16, 1926 in Solon Township, Michigan, the son of John and Emily (French) Heiss. He retired from Smith Industries in the late 1980’s working there over 35 years. He was an avid fisherman and hunter, had a wonderful sense of humor and was very compassionate and generous. He was a member of Peace Lutheran Church, Sparta. Mourning his loss are his devoted wife, Betty (Martin) whom he married on October 14, 1950; beloved daughter, Nancy Heiss Merritt; grandsons, Dan (Michele) Hilliker, Dennis (Michele) Hilliker; great-grandchildren, Andrew (Kayla), Aaron, Jacky, Emily and Stephen Hilliker; sister-in-law, Ellen Heiss; stepson, Robert (Judy) Hey and their families; many loving nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; brothers, Munson, Otto, Leland and Elbert; sister, Esther Clarke. The family greeted friends Wednesday, July 6 at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The service was held Thursday 11:00 a.m. at Peace Lutheran Church, 1225 12 Mile Road NW, Sparta with viewing beginning at 10:00 am. Pastor Bryan Schneider-Thomas officiating. Interment Solon Township Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Cedar Springs Historical Society.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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PETER NAFFZIGER

 

In Loving Memory of our Dear Father and Grandfather, Peter Naffziger, who passed away 50 years ago on July 5, 1966.

If the world was ours to give we would give it all and more.

To hear your footsteps and see you come smiling through the door.

We cannot bring the old days back, your hand we cannot touch,

But we will always have the memories of the one we love so much.

Sadly missed by 

Children & Grandchildren

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ALTON & IRENE WHITE

 

In Loving Memory of our Dear Father, Alton White, who passed away 51 years ago on June 14, 1965 and our Dear Mother, Irene White, who left us 41 years ago July 10, 1975.

Your memory to us is a keepsake,

With which we will never part.

Though God has you in His keeping,

We have you always in our hearts.

Sadly missed by 

Roger & Diane White

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Thank you

 

To the Administration and Staff of Metron of Cedar Springs: Thank you all for the helpful, friendly care given to Gwen Perry. She was a gallant lady and each of you, in your own way, kept Gwen with us until God called her home. We will always remember your competent, loving care for her.

Lyle Perry, Jr. and Family

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Lost Hours

Lost, yesterday, somewhere between sunrise and sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty diamond minutes. No reward is offered, for they are gone forever.

by Thomas Mann

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Dale G. Anderson

C-OBIT-andersonDale G. Anderson, 62 of Cedar Springs, died Tuesday, June 28, 2016 doing what he loved, riding his motorcycle. Dale was born July 27, 1953 in Chicago, IL the son of Richard and Marion (Pyne) Anderson. He was a truss assembler for 43 years. Dale was a stubborn, rough neck, loving and caring biker. He so loved his granddaughters that he had their names tattooed on his arm. Surviving are his wife of 38 years, Elaine; daughter, Lacey (Nathan) Wright; grandchildren, Kayda, Avalon, Harlynn; mother, Marion Anderson; brother, Raymond Anderson; sister-in-law, Donna (Robert) Greenland; five nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father and parents-in-law. A memorial gathering will be held Sunday, July 10 at 1 pm at Morley Park, Cedar Springs. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Kent County.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs.

 

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