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Archive | From the Pulpit

El Shaddai

Rockford-Springs-Church-webPastor David Vander Meer

Rockford Springs Community 

14 Mile Road NE • Rockford

 

El Shaddai is one of the wonderful names of God. This two-part name is usually translated from the Hebrew into English as “God Almighty.” The first time God shares this name is with an old man who is no longer the strong man of his youth. His name is Abram. He is about to be given a new name from the one who is now to be understood as the “God Almighty.”

In Genesis 17, God comes to Abram to renew a promise He had made with him years prior. In Genesis 12, God had promised Abram, who had no children, that He would make him into a great nation, that He would bless Him, and make his name great. He promised to protect him and ultimately use him to bring a blessing to all nations. But as the years went on waiting for this promise to unfold, there were times that Abram and his wife failed to fully trust the Word of God. In Genesis 17, he is a 99-year-old man. His strength is no longer sufficient. His stamina is no longer vigorous. He is no longer capable of carrying out this promise on his own. Now comes the El Shaddai to bring His power to an old man.

So Abram (exalted father) becomes Abraham (father of many) because of the El Shaddai. God Almighty is able to take the powerless and bring them power. He is able to bring the barren a family. He is able to make the lame walk, the blind see, and the deaf to hear. He is able to raise the dead and make them live abundantly. The El Shaddai of Genesis 17 will be displayed from this first book of the Bible to the last book of the Bible in such amazing ways that His glory will be unmatched by any.

This almighty power of the “God Almighty” is best revealed in Jesus Christ through His life, death, resurrection, and ascension. In His life, His power stands against all sin so that He is fully righteous. In His death, His power takes upon Himself the sins of His people and satisfies the just wrath of God. In His resurrection, His power is seen with the open empty tomb. And today His power is exhibited as He sits on the right hand of the Father ruling and reigning over His kingdom. Jesus is “God Almighty.”

Remember that this God Almighty used His power to fulfill every promise made to Abraham. Abraham is the father of all those that take up his faith in El Shaddai. He is able to meet all our needs as we come to His power and admit to being powerless without Him. May God Almighty now bring blessing to your life. AMEN.

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Paczki’s and Ashes 

cs-united-methodist

Pastor Steve Lindeman

Cedar Springs United Methodist Church

140 S. Main St.

Cedar Springs, MI  49319

 

We’ve been seeing advertisements for the past few weeks—“It’s almost paczki time!” If it seems to you that the pictures of the traditional Polish pastries are showing up early, you’re right—Shrove Tuesday comes early this year. Also known as Fat Tuesday, this is the day that some people celebrate by indulging in rich foods. Making paczki’s is the tradition designed to use up any fat, or other rich foods that are in the home, prior to the fasting that is supposed to take place in the days after.

It is also on Fat Tuesday that the celebration of Mardi Gras culminates in a night of parties and revelry. The reason for these holidays is basically to get out our desires to eat, drink and be merry out of the way prior to the season of Lent.

You may not observe Lent in your faith tradition, but you may have acquaintances or coworkers who give something up for Lent. This is done in observation of the 40 days that Christ spent in the wilderness fasting. We seek to give up something in our lives—something that is not helpful to our spiritual or physical wellbeing. Some might give up chocolate or soda; others might give up fatty foods. We give up to deny a physical desire in our lives, so that we might focus upon the spiritual aspects. We give up in recognition that God has created each of us, not only as creatures that inhabit a physical world but as beings created with a spirit that will continue on into eternity.

This year, Lent will begin on February 10, which is Ash Wednesday. With the placing of the ashes on our foreheads, we are reminded of the words found in Genesis 3:19, “… for dust you are and to dust you will return.”

As we begin our Lenten journey this year, let us give up to help us prepare ourselves for the promise of spring, and the even greater promise held in Easter. Let us remember that, although we are in this world, we are not of this world. During Lent, let us focus upon the spiritual aspects of our lives as we walk this path together. Jesus set aside the temporary physical nature of the world through his time of trials—let us do the same.

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Looking to God in a Crisis

Pilgrim-Bible-webRev. Mike Shiery

Pilgrim Bible Church

West Pine Street • Cedar Springs

 

“Lord, how they have increased who trouble me! Many are they who rise up against me. 

Many are they who say of me, ‘There is no help for him in God.’ Selah. But You, O Lord, are a shield for me, my glory and the One Who lifts up my head.” (Psalm 3:1-3) (NKJV)

When we come face to face with a crisis in our life, many times our instinctive reaction is to feel totally overwhelmed by the immensity, complexity, and seriousness of what we are facing. If we give into that temptation often we find ourselves mired in despair and feeling like the crisis will never end. This, in turn, can lead to even more problems which we must confront.

In Psalm 3, we find David facing an incredible personal crisis that enveloped the nation of Israel in its grip. We are permitted a glimpse into what David was confronting and more importantly, we can see a path to dealing with our own crises.

David was facing a political coup. There was a cleverly organized conspiracy to take away the throne of Israel from him. To add insult to injury, this plot engineered by his beloved son, Absalom. David was facing not only civil rebellion in the kingdom, but far more crushingly he was dealing with betrayal by former close friends and his own son. Of all the painful things we may have to face in life, nothing is more traumatic than when friends turn against us or our own family members stab us in the back.

It is interesting that David begins this Psalm by addressing the Lord directly. He was facing the nightmare of his life. He had been forced to flee from his palace in the capital city of Jerusalem. Now an exile, running for his life, no longer certain who to trust, he shows his desperate dependence by turning immediately to God.

Likewise, it is always appropriate in our crisis moments, as well as the good times, to turn to God first. Ultimately He can help and work out our situations when everything and everyone else has failed, so why wast time. Go to Him first!

David noted in verse 2 that there were many who observed his situation and boldly declared, “There is no help for him in God.” They felt that either God had abandoned David or that God was powerless to change the situation. They saw the writing on the wall and viewed the outcome as an inevitable disaster for David.

May I remind you that even when everybody says your crisis is hopeless that the last chapter has not necessarily been written. It is not unusual that when the world declares something is over for God to step and announce that He’s just begun to work in that situation.

In verse 3, David begins to enumerate what God is to him and why he has perfect confidence in the Almighty in the midst of this crisis. He says that God is his shield. The word “shield” there means more than a mere frontal protection. It was a protection that completely surrounded David. It was a protection from his trials without and his trials without and his temptations within.

David went on to announce his confidence that God was his glory and his uplifter. Men had cast him down, but the Lord was there to lift him up again. Even though violent plots had been hatched against him, God would sustain him and restore peace to his life again.

Friends, if you have given your heart and life to God you are in His perfect, loving care. You may be reeling in the midst of your crisis, but your Heavenly Father sees exactly where you are and He has the resources to bring stability to your life even in the midst of your storm. Stand confident in your faith in God’s power, and know that God does all things well. Even in the worst of times, you can and must trust the perfect character of God. David found it to be true and so can you!

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Final Greetings

C-East-NelsonPastor Herb VanderBilt 

East Nelson United Methodist Church

9024 18 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs MI 49319

“Finally, brothers, good-by. Aim for perfection, listen to my appeal, be of one mind, and live in peace. And the God of love and peace will be with you.  Greet one another with a holy kiss. All the saints send their greetings. May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.”

This year I could not wait to see the new Star Wars movie and when I got to see it, it was great. One of greetings that is attributed to the Star Wars series is the phrase “may the force be with you,” although I am not sure that it is ever used exactly that way in the movie. In any case, it is an appropriate greeting even in the church, provided we edit out the secular word force and insert the Holy Spirit. In the movie, this greeting serves to provide hope to people (and aliens) who are struggling against an evil force committed to destroying all the “good” people.  One of the problems is that it is not always easy to tell the good guys from the bad guys. In the movie, the force can be used for good or it can be used for evil; in fact, one of the characters representing the dark force was originally using the force for good. What both the Jedi knights and the apostle Paul knew was that the force for evil is very powerful and that we always need to be on our guard.

The apostle Paul is writing to a church that has struggled with a lot of issues and in his last address to them challenges them to a higher power, to continue the fight, and to stay in fellowship with one another. This may seem to also be an appropriate message as we leave 2015 and go forward into 2016. May God’s force be with us all.

 

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Don’t be afraid 

Grace-ChurchPastor Kevin Reed

Grace Evangelical Free Church

4714 13 Mile Rd, Rockford

www.gracerockford.com

 

by Kevin Reed

No matter how many times it happens to me, I am still taken by surprise when it happens. How many times do we open our Bibles to read the word of God that was written years ago, and have a specific verse jump off the page like it was the very word that God was speaking to us today! Isaiah 41:10 is one of those verses for me. “So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.  I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.”

Let’s face it, there is a lot to be scared about.  We live in a world  where violence seems to be the order of the day and common sense seems to no longer be so common.  For the 21st century Christian it is very easy to become bogged down with fear. As a matter of fact many of the ways I see some Believers responding to and interacting with the world today is purely a result of fear. But it should not be this way!

Fear actually has no place in the life of the believer. We may not know the outcome of tomorrow but we know the One who does.  We may not have the strength to make it through the day, but we have a promise from the One who does. For the Christian there is absolutely nothing in this world to fear because we have been promised the presence of the Almighty to be with us through whatever this world throws our way. And the last time I checked, when He speaks all of creation listens!

So, do not fear, the God who holds all things in His hands is with  you, and He has promised to be right by your side giving you everything that you need!

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A Merry Christmas and a Holy Year of Mercy

Merciful-artFather Lam T. Le, Pastor

St. John Paul II Parish

3110 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs, Michigan
www.jp2-mqa.org

This Christmas is a unique one for Catholics throughout the world. This is due to the fact that the spiritual leader, Pope Francis, declared an Extraordinary Jubilee for Mercy from December 8, 2015-November 20, 2016. This is a “special time for the Church, a time when the witness of believers might grow stronger and more effective” (Misericordiae Vultus, no. 3). In other words, the Pope calls upon Catholics and men and women of good will to see in Jesus, the Mercy of God made flesh and challenges us to engage in the works of mercy in our everyday lives. “The works of mercy are charitable actions by which we come to the aid of our neighbor in his spiritual and bodily necessities” (Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 2447).

The theme, contemplating Jesus, Mercy of God made flesh, is clearly expressed in the logo of the Jubilee.  The Vatican’s Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization explains:

“The logo . . . presents . . . the theme of mercy. In fact, it represents an image quite important to the early Church: that of the Son having taken upon his shoulders the lost soul demonstrating that it is the love of Christ that brings to completion the mystery of his incarnation culminating in redemption. The logo has been designed in such a way so as to express the profound way in which the Good Shepherd touches the flesh of humanity and does so with a love with the power to change one’s life. One particular feature worthy of note is that while the Good Shepherd, in his great mercy, takes humanity upon himself, his eyes are merged with those of man. Christ sees with the eyes of Adam, and Adam with the eyes of Christ. Every person discovers in Christ, the new Adam, one’s own humanity and the future that lies ahead, contemplating, in his gaze, the love of the Father.”

In this blessed season, indeed we celebrate that God showed us His love in a very special way:  sending His Son “in the likeness of our sinful flesh” (Rm 8:3).  Through this Mercy of God “made flesh and made his dwelling among us” (Jn 1:14), may our entire life be the praise of God’s mercy.

Have a blessed 2016 and may you and your family be transformed in this Jubilee Year by God’s merciful love!  Amen.

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Glory to God and peace to men

Pastor Craig Carter

North Kent Community Church

1480 Indian Lakes Rd., Sparta, MI 49345

 

“But the angel said to them, ‘Do not be afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of great joy which will be for all the people; for today in the city of David there has been born for you a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.’ And suddenly there appeared with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, ‘Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among men with whom He is pleased.’”

This passage of scripture in Luke 2 is one of the most read verses in the bible this time of year. There is so much here, it is often easy to overlook the powerful, yet simple message of Christmas found in these verses! We see from this passage, the angel’s message was one of good news about a specific day in history, in a specific city, about a real Savior, who is Christ the Lord. While this news was being proclaimed, immediately there was a response from heaven. The heavenly response declared two very distinct purposes that God had for sending Jesus to earth.

The first was to declare the Glory of God. Notice it took one angel to announce the savior’s birth, but a multitude joined with the angel to praise God! This word multitude is a military term, also translated host. It meant an army. An army of angels came to sing and proclaim God’s glory. It signified how important this event in history was. It signified how important this Savior was. It was a life-changing event that would forever change the course of history. What did it mean? What did it proclaim? It proclaimed how much God loved the world. We are reminded in John 3:16, that “God so loved the world, that he sent his one and only son…” It declared to all of humanity that God alone deserves all our praise. It was intended to grab all of man’s attention and direct it to the one who was worthy to receive it, Jesus Christ! Christmas is designed and celebrated to turn the world’s attention to Jesus.

Secondly, the multitude of angles declared that peace was now available to all mankind, through this sign, this Savior—Jesus Christ. Often, we declare this peace, at Christmas, as a universal one. Meaning everyone can have peace on earth. This is true, but only to a degree. Meaning, this peace is available to everyone on earth, but only to those on “whom God’s favor” rests. Who may that be, you ask? God’s favor rests on those who receive Jesus Christ as savior, as the one who forgives us of our sin; as the Christ, the one who provides hope; as Lord, the one who defeats our enemies and makes us secure; and the one who provides us peace. Ephesians 2:14 says, “For he himself (Jesus) is our peace…” In the current days we are living in, everyone is ultimately looking for and pursuing peace in their own ways. We would love to see the world at peace with each other. However, apart from Jesus Christ this will never occur. Christmas says that Christ is the answer for peace in the world. That’s why many are anti-Christmas. They ultimately are opposing Christ. The message of Christmas to the whole world is that there is peace through a relationship with Jesus Christ! The angels sang and declared this good news of peace. The greatest gift this Christmas is personal peace with God through Jesus Christ. Will you receive it?

Merry Christmas! Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace among men!

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A Giving Heart

Cedar-Christian-ChurchPastor Ryan Black

Cedar Springs Christian Church

340 West Pine Street, Cedar Springs

 

Christmas is quickly approaching and for many it is a celebration where family and friends spend time together as they recognize the birth of our Lord Jesus Christ. This time of year we are reminded of those in need and who are less fortunate than ourselves. It is wonderful that we have concern of those people in need, however, we often times become satisfied with solely having sincere thoughts or sharing kind words. While these are good things, we often fail to fulfill any actual giving or physical assistance to those same individuals. The Bible describes this very concept in James 2:15-16.

When we think of being selfish or greedy, we tend to think of mean spirited people who are engrossed in themselves and their needs and not of the needs of others. While there are people in this world who exhibit this Scrooge-type personality, the truth is, all of us demonstrate some greed and have self-centered tendencies. This tendency can get in the way of our willingness to give or to help those in need. The Bible tells us the importance of helping others throughout the scriptures including Proverbs 21:13, Proverbs 28:27 and in the parable of “The Good Samaritan” (Luke 10:25-37).

Why is God so concerned about us giving to and helping others? God tells us in Genesis 1:27:So God created man in His own image. This indicates that we are to be like God and to take on His traits. To be like God is to give. Our God is a giver and that’s apparent in the scriptures.  However, the most important thing God gave came around 2,000 years ago. John 3:16 says, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” The Bible also tells us to be Christ-like (Philippians 2:1-3). When we read the Gospels, you will see Christ consistently helping those in need. Therefore, God wants us to give in order that we may be like Him. The Bible tells us that a “giving spirit” cannot be forced; it is something that must come from the heart and should be an enjoyable act from within (2 Corinthians 9:7).

This time of year we are reminded to give to those in need. The concept of giving should not just be contemplated around Christmas. It should continue throughout our entire life, in order that a Giving Spirit may take over. When we become focused on being a Giver instead of a Receiver, it will change our life forever. Giving is something God intended for us to do to others just as He does for us when we face adversity. The Bible tells us that if we give like Him, we will be blessed for it (Proverbs 22:9).

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The Love of God 

Pastor Dick Nichols

Cedar Creek Community Church

2969 14 Mile Road, Sparta

 

Over the years, I have found myself many times contemplating life. Not the navel-gazing type of contemplation, but seriously wondering, where is my life headed? What have I done or haven’t done? Only to come up with a negative value. This process of self-evaluation is common to the human species. I have discovered there are a couple of questions that many people who take the time to reflect on their lives get stumped on—including me.

“What difference does my life make?”

“Does anybody really know or care about me?”

Personal inventories can have different results on different days, with different circumstances past or pending, different moods and a wide range of other factors. One of the triggers for me is that I’m not getting any younger, and considering my life, the good and bad, what have I really done for the Lord in those decades? Recently, I was in one of these processes (ruts), when God brought a scripture to my memory that really shifted my wondering into a positive light.

“I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well” (Psalm 139:14 NIV).

In the Old Testament, we find King David meditating on the fact that it is God who made him. In truth, each of us was created, by God, for a purpose.  That is difficult for many to believe, especially as we look at the world around us and consider the prospects for our future.

There is an often-used phrase in many of our conversations today, “It is what it is.” We may look at this from a personal standpoint and conclude that “We are what we are,” and that’s that!  But the Psalmist’s words in Psalm 139:14 implies that yes, we are what we are, but that isn’t all that we are. I want to make clear that King David was not just saying these words fearfully. It does not mean we are made to be frightened or scared of the Lord. What is being said is that David, is being made (created) by God, and holds God in awe, respect and reverence.

None of us had a say in how we were made but we can have a say in what we become. We live in a world where many examples of a “successful life” would not be what God’s plan is for you. Some rock stars, athletic stars, entertainment stars or other icons may appear to be what we want to be, but in the end, we are better advised to choose what God wants us to be.

In any industry we find people who are the stars, at the top of their peers. While unseen, they were created by God and given their gifts or talents by him. And working under these people are the folks who actually make them what or who they are. Fame is fleeting.

When I look back, many of my years working towards the goals I set weren’t spent very wisely. Position, honor, admiration, reputation, security, etc. are certainly worthy human endeavors, but through the first half of my life, I didn’t consider what God’s plans were for me. To say it more clearly, “I didn’t include God in my plans.” There were many times that I looked at where I was at and circumstances that existed where I was at, and felt stomped on, aimless, and all too often worthless.

I have achieved each of those goals in some shape and form, but not one of them lasted. Even what I thought was security turned out to be more of a soap bubble that lasts just a short while. This scripture verse quoted above is personal to me, as it was one of the first that I really considered when I first began my life with Jesus. I discovered that I was made with a purpose in mind. Not what I had planned, but that God had a plan for me.

Every life is a gift of God, even when we don’t feel like it is. We have free moral agency to choose our path in life, and to choose whose counsel we will follow. We must remember that the god we choose to follow in this life will be the god we will serve throughout eternity. Scripture says, “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future’ (Jeremiah 29:11 NIV).

Choose your God wisely!

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How to have a worship-filled feast

The-Springs-blurred-webPastor Barry Briggs

The Springs Church

135 N. Grant St., Cedar Springs

 

The famous “theologian” Andy Rooney had this to say about Thanksgiving: “The emphasis is more on what we have for dinner this Thursday than it is on any other holiday. Once you’ve given thanks on Thanksgiving, there isn’t much else to do but watch football and eat.”

Is that true? Is Thanksgiving just a quick prayer followed by food and football and maybe a little online shopping? Thanksgiving can be so much more; in fact, it is intended to be. More than food, more than football, more than door busters, Thanksgiving can be a day of worship, and a chance to share a meal in Jesus’ honor. But how?

I’d like to share three secrets with you for turning an otherwise traditional Thanksgiving meal into a worship-filled feast.

Secret #1: Read a Thanksgiving Psalm together after you sit down to the table and before you say grace.

Colossians 3:16-17 (NLT) says, “Let the words of Christ, in all their richness, live in your hearts and make you wise. Use His words to teach and counsel each other. Sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs to God with thankful hearts.  And whatever you do or say, let it be as a representative of the Lord Jesus, all the while giving thanks through Him to God the Father.”

One of the ways you can turn your Thanksgiving meal into an opportunity for worship is to incorporate Scripture into it. Reading a Thanksgiving Psalm before the meal lets the words of Christ live in your hearts and sets the table for a worship-filled feast. Some great Thanksgiving Psalms from the Bible include Psalm 30, 32, 34, 40, 66, 100, 116, and 138.

There are lots of ways to do this. Here are two: everyone gathered could read the Thanksgiving Psalm together in unison, or one person could read it out loud for the whole group. Be creative and have fun.  After you read the psalm, go around the table and have each person share what they are thankful for.

Secret #2: Give thanks before and AFTER the meal.

Deuteronomy 8:6-10 (NLT) reads, “Obey the commands of the Lord your God by walking in His ways and fearing Him. For the Lord your God is bringing you into a good land of flowing streams and pools of water, with springs that gush forth in the valleys and hills. It is a land of wheat and barley, of grapevines, fig trees, pomegranates, olives, and honey.  It is a land where food is plentiful and nothing is lacking…When you have eaten your fill, praise the Lord your God for the good land He has given you.”

I’m assuming most of us give thanks before our Thanksgiving meals. But the idea of giving thanks afterward may be foreign to many of you. Giving thanks after a meal is a tradition that has been lost by most Christians, especially Protestants.  But it is a tradition that goes back to the earliest believers, and to Jewish practice as well. Tertullian, a famous early church theologian wrote, “We do not recline at a banquet before prayer be first tasted; in like manner prayer puts an end to the feast.”

Jesus Himself gave thanks before and after meals. We see Him modeling this at the Last Supper where He gave thanks for the bread at the beginning of the meal, and gave thanks for the cup at the close of the meal.

We get our word “gratitude” from the word “grace.” So saying grace before or after a meal literally means to give thanks or to give gratitude. After we have finished eating and our stomachs are full, it is only natural to express our gratitude to God for all He has blessed us with. Like Deuteronomy 8:10 says, “When you have eaten your fill, praise the Lord your God for the good land He has given you.”

This year you might want to start a new Thanksgiving tradition of giving thanks after your done eating in addition to saying grace before your meal.

Secret #3: Make your meal a time for serving others, sharing love, and seeking reconciliation.

A quick sprint through the New Testament shows how thankful Paul was for his brothers and sisters in Christ. Romans 1:8a (NLT): “Let me say first that I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you…” 1 Corinthians 1:4 (NLT): “I always thank my God for you and for the gracious gifts He has given you, now that you belong to Christ Jesus.” Philippians 1:3 (NLT): “Every time I think of you, I give thanks to my God.”

Thanksgiving is a great time to follow Paul’s example and share with others how thankful we are for them.

The truth is, for Christians this should be a daily practice, not just once a year on Thanksgiving. Acts 2:46-47 (NIV) describes how the first Christians lived a thanksgiving lifestyle on a daily basis.

“Every day they continued to meet together in the Temple courts.  They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts, praising God and enjoying the favor of all the people. And the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved.”

From the beginning Christians have broken bread and eaten together.  The act of breaking bread together is rich with symbolism. Jesus broke bread with His disciples at the Last Supper, making it symbolic of forgiveness and reconciliation.  Jesus fed a crowd of 5000 people with broken pieces of bread from 5 loaves, making it symbolic of care and compassion.  In the Old Testament the ritual of breaking the Passover bread symbolizes God’s power to deliver His people.

Thanksgiving incorporates all of this symbolism. It is a time for forgiveness and reconciliation, a time for care and compassion, and a time to give thanks for all that God has done to save us.

Turn your Thanksgiving meal into a worship-filled feast by having each person share what they thank God for in another person at the table.  Again there are lots of ways to do this, so be creative.  As dishes are being passed the person who is passing could tell the person they are passing to what it is about that person they are thankful for.

At the end of the day, our Thanksgiving meals should always be held in Jesus’ honor.  Jesus was the guest of honor at many meals.  I’m reminded of Matthew’s party, the meal at Zacchaeus’ home, when Jesus visited Mary and Martha’s home, and when Jesus visited Peter’s mom.

For those of you who are really extreme you might consider leaving an empty chair at the head of your table to symbolize that this meal is in Jesus’ honor and to remember that He is present with you.

This year, try some of these ideas to turn an otherwise traditional meal into a worship-filled feast. By incorporating Scripture, prayer, serving and sharing into your Thanksgiving meal you can do just that.

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