web analytics

WMP wrestlers to advance to state

WMP qualifiers for the state finals. Photo by B. Chong.

By Barbra Chong

West Michigan Pursuit entered 21 grapplers to wrestle at regionals last weekend, and 20 are advancing to the state finals in two weeks. Of the 20 qualifiers, 13 are Regional Champions. As a team, they are currently ranked as follows: 

#5 for Most Pins/Least Time with 27 pins in 42.11. 

#1 for most Tech Falls/Least Time with 8 tech falls in 22.16. 

#3 for most Pins/Tech Falls/Least Time with 35 in 64.27. 

#4 for Most total match points 413 points and #1 for Winning Percentage 58 wins/11 Losses 82% win ratio. 

Individual placements are as follows: 52 lb Tatianna Castillo, 7/8 age group finished 5th Place. 95 lb Blake Hammer, 2004 age group; 100 lb Isa Starr, 2007 age group and 67 lb Kamden Witte, 2007 age group finished 3rdPlace. 55 lb Kaleb Pautke,7/8 age group; 58 lb Aaiden Vasquez, 7/8 age group and 59 lb Kellen Weckesser, 2008 age group finished 2nd Place. 

2018 Regional Champions are 67 lb Evan Andrews,2008 age group; 70 lb Xavier Carpentier, 2005 age group; 63 lb Quinten Cassiday, 2008 age group; 75 lb Harper Cheng, 2007 age group; 43 lb Brody Compau, 7/8 age group; 67 lb Luke Egan, 2007 age group; 64 lb Drew Moro, 7/8 age group; 75 lb Tyler Parmeter, 2008 age group; 85 Blake Peasley, 2007 age group; 138 lb Aaron Smith, HS; 80 lb Isaiah Sostenes, 2007 age group; 65 lb Josh Vasquez, 2006 age group and 49 lb Blake Werkema, 7/8 age group. 

We also want to recognize some grapplers who have practiced with us full time all season but do not currently wrestle under WMP: 

63 lb Hunter Eek, 2008 age group finished 3rd Place; and 80 lb Alex Buskirk, 2007 age group finished 2nd Place. 

2018 Regional Champions are 55 lb Tanner Cowles, 7/8 age group; 75 lb Ian Cook, 2006 age group and 75 lb Ayden McClurken, 2007 age group. 

WMP also recognizes the hard work of the following grapplers: Quinten Cassiday and Brody Compau, who earned their back to back Regional Championships; Tyler Parmeter, Josh Vasquez and Blake Werkema earned their 3rd consecutive Regional Championship; Ayden McClurken, Drew Moro and Blake Peasley earned their 4th consecutive Regional Championship; and Luke Egan earned his 5th consecutive Regional Championship. 

“These kids continue to exceed my expectations week after week,” said head coach Dave Andrus. “They have diligently pushed themselves and each other to get where they are right now. Going into the State Finals in a few weeks, I have the highest of confidence on their performance. A very special thank you to Bill, Aaron and all of my supportive parents. We are not coaching an elite group of All Stars. We are showing them the path it takes to realize their hard work come to fruition to be recognized as an All Star. This is what I strive for.” 

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

Cedar Springs Youth Wrestlers head to state

Cedar Springs Youth Wrestlers after a successful regionals. Photo by J. Troupe.

By Jacquie Troupe

Thirty-eight Cedar Springs Youth Wrestlers competed at the Myway West Regionals March 10-11 for the top four spots in each division to continue on to the State competition on March 23-25. 

The team placed 2nd in pins with 38 in 59:49; 3rd in techs with 4 in 14:23; and 1st in Team Points with 586. The kids went 85-61 for the weekend. 

According to Coach Scott Marsman, they are so proud of themselves and of their hard work and dedication. They are anxious for the State competition and are looking forward to the fun times with their teammates. 

In the 2011-13 division 43lb class, Sierra Streeter scored 27 TMP (tied for 70th), placed 4th. Brycen Alber placed 5th. In the 52lb class Nolan Averill had 2 pins in 2:30 (73rd), 38 TMP (tied for 24th) and placed 2nd. In the 55lb class Dillon VanDyke had 2 pins in 1:20 (43rd), his fastest pin was :36 (tied for 70th) and he placed 3rd. The Champion in the 64lb class was Jaxon Fitzgerald. He had 2 pins in 2:11 (62nd), his fastest pin was :11 (4th). The Champion in the 67lb class was Ben Streeter. His fastest pin was 1:58.

In the 2009-10 divisions, Tucker Dines scored 55 TMP (most on the team and tied for 3rd) and placed 6th in the 52lb class. Caleigh Wood had 2 pins in 3:32 (94th) and placed 5th in the 55lb class. Tucker Crystal had a pin in 1:17 and placed 3rd in the 58lb class. The Champion in the 67lb class was Chasyn Winchel. His fastest pin was :27 (tied for 40th). Alex Hanes placed 3rd in the 72lb class. The Champion in the 77lb class was Jon Libera.  He had 2 pins in 2:28 (tied for 72nd). Zach Vu placed 5th in the 97lb class. 

In the 2008 division Deegan Pike placed 5th in the 63lb class. Austin Averill placed 6th in the 67lb class. Spencer Schoenborn placed 4th in the 67lb class. The Champion in the 71lb class was Blake Falan. He had 3 pins in 4:31 (15th), his fastest pin was :25 (tied for 28th).

Olivia Lawson placed 3rd in the 85lb class. 

In the 2007 divisions Trenton Perez placed 3rd in the 59lb class. Brandson Wood placed 3rd in the 63lb class. Kaiden Dreyer had one Tech in 2:20(12th), scored 53 TMP (7th) and placed 3rd in the  80lb class. Rory Shoenborn had two Techs in 8:13 (7th), 48 TMP (9th) and placed 5th in the 80lb class. Gavyn Byxbe placed 3rd in the 85lb class. Hudson Crystal had 2 pins in 2:24 (68th) and he placed 2nd in the 90lb class. Dakota Winchel placed 2nd in the 130lb class. 

In the 2006 division Wyatt Cooper placed 2nd in the 183lb class.

In the 2005 division  Gabe Gair had two pins in 2:00(57th), 1 Tech in 3:50 (49th) and placed 5th in the 105lb class. 

In the 2004 divisions the Champion in the 114lb class was Carter Falan. He had two pins in 2:28. Logan Troupe had a pin in 2:11and placed 4th in the 122lb class. Ben Brunner had a pin in 1:22and placed 3rd in the 122lb class. The Champion in the 170lb class was Maston Wood. He had a pin in 4:04.

In the 2003 division Ashly Erxleben placed 6th.

In the 2002-03 HS division Andrew VanGessel had a pin in 2:29and placed 5th in the 115lb class.

In the 1999-2001 division David Erxleben placed 5th in the 133lb class.

Posted in SportsComments (0)

Taking action now can reduce bear problems later

Property owners can help prevent problems with bears by removing food sources like bird feeders now.

With longer daylight hours and warming temperatures causing wildlife to start to move, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources advises property owners that now is the time to look around and see if they have items that soon may be attracting bears.

“The ideal situation is for a bear to walk past your property, not find a food reward and move along on its own,” said DNR wildlife communication coordinator Katie Keen. “That’s the best way to live with bears and not encourage conflict.”

Black bears—an “up north” Michigan icon decorating many homes, restaurants and hotels—can be found throughout more than half the state. Spotting a bear tends to draw a lot of interest and attention. 

“Everyone picks up the phone to call us looking for advice at a different point,” Keen said. “For some, seeing a black bear is enough. For others, it may be regular or daytime visits that make them uneasy.”

Bears find birdseed and suet especially attractive, as they are high-calorie and reliable compared to other plentiful and natural food sources. Bird feeders can draw bears past their natural habitat, where they would normally be enjoying roots of early spring plants and insects in trees and logs. Bears also typically will continue to return to a location once they have found a food reward there.

“The majority of calls we receive about bears involve a bird feeder. Taking the feeders down before they are found by a bear can eliminate future problems,” said Keen. “A bear doesn’t just forget an easy meal, and wild animals can pick up habits.”  

During the spring and early summer, phone calls to the DNR from home and business owners frustrated with bear activity increase. While it is legal to feed birds, property owners may be creating an irreversible safety issue by providing food for bears. 

“Bears that receive a food reward when around homes, yards and neighborhoods typically lose their natural fear of humans and can become a potential threat to people and their pets,” Keen added.

The easiest thing people can do to avoid problems with bears is remove bird feeders during the spring and summer months. With an estimated 2,000-plus adult bears in the northern Lower Peninsula and almost 10,000 in the Upper Peninsula, there are plenty of bears searching for natural food that is plentiful in forests, fields and wetlands.

“Many people who live in northern Michigan remove their bird feeders during the spring and summer, but every year the spring sneaks up on us and suddenly, it is now that time of year,” said Keen. 

Wild animals should be appreciated from a distance. Michigan residents can help their neighborhoods and communities by removing bird feeders and other attractants. Garbage cans, dumpsters, barbeque grills, restaurant grease bins and bee hives also can attract bears to areas people frequent.

For your safety, never intentionally feed or try to tame bears – it is in your, and the bear’s, best interest. It is critical that bears retain their natural fear of humans.

Learn more about Michigan’s black bears and how to prevent potential problemsby visiting michigan.gov/bear or by watching “The Bear Essentials” video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6c1c3qw7dg.

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

Spring birding tours at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders 

Red-winged blackbirds are some of spring’s first arrivals at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders.

Nothing says spring like the “conk-a-ree” call of a red-winged blackbird or the raucous sounds of a sandhill crane. Celebrate spring and explore Michigan’s wetlands with a birding tour at one of the Wetland Wonders – or managed waterfowl areas – around the state.

Highlights of the birding tours may include diving and dabbling ducks in full breeding plumage, trumpeter and tundra swans, osprey, bald eagles, sandhill cranes, and many others. Michigan Department of Natural Resources wildlife staff members and volunteers from Ducks Unlimited and Audubon Clubs will lead the tours, which may include a “sneak peek” driving tour into refuge areas that normally are closed. 

The birding tours will be held on the following dates:

  • March 17 at 8 a.m. – St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area, 3857 Columbine Road, Harsens Island; 810-748-9504 
  • March 24 at 9 a.m. – Fish Point State Game Area, 7750 Ringle Road, Unionville; 989-674-2511
  • March 31 at 9 a.m. – Fennville Farm Unit of the Allegan State Game Area, 6013 118th Ave., Fennville; 269-673-2430
  • April 7 at 9 a.m. – Maple River State Game Area, southwest corner of South Baldwin and Crapo roads in Washington Township, east of U.S. 127; 616-446-0555
  • April 7 at 9 a.m. – Shiawassee River State Game Area, 225 East Spruce St., St. Charles; 989-865-6211
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Muskegon County Wastewater System, meet at the Muskegon State Game Area Office, 7600 E. Messinger Road, Twin Lake; 231-788-5055
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Pointe Mouillee State Game Area, 37025 Mouillee Road, Rockwood; 734-379-9692
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Nayanquing Point State Wildlife Area, 1570 Tower Beach Road, Pinconning; 989-697-5101

If you have questions about bird tours, please contact the appropriate office at the phone number listed above. Most tours will meet at the area’s headquarters building. Please dress for the weather and bring binoculars. Spotting scopes are also helpful for long-range viewing. The ground may be quite muddy and wet, so plan to wear boots. 

Michigan’s Wetland Wonders are the seven premier managed waterfowl hunt areas in the state: Fennville Farm Unit at the Allegan State Game Area (Allegan County), Fish Point State Wildlife Area (Tuscola County), St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area on Harsens Island (St. Clair County), Muskegon County Wastewater Facility (Muskegon County), Nayanquing Point State Wildlife Area (Bay County), Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (Monroe and Wayne counties) and Shiawassee River State Game Area (Saginaw County). To learn more about Michigan’s Wetland Wonders, visit michigan.gov/wetlandwonders

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

Bird nest boxes


By Ranger Steve Mueller


It is time to clean nest boxes. Bird behavior announces they are claiming breeding territory. It is beautiful music to our ears when we hear the variety of songs in our neighborhood. In bird neighborhoods, songs announce property boundaries and call for mates. 

Within a given breeding territory, appropriate nesting space is essential. Many species require cavities in hollow trees. People have a habit of removing dead and hollow trees for a variety of reasons. To maintain adequate cavity nest opportunities, install nest boxes in a variety of habitats. 

Most well-known are Eastern Bluebird and Tree Swallow nest boxes. If not placed well they are taken over by House Wrens or House Sparrows that frequently kill bluebirds and swallows. 

At the Howard Christensen Nature Center, I made sure the nest boxes were a considerable distance from shrubbery. When placed in open areas, the House Sparrows and House Wrens usually did not interfere with the open field nesting species. Tree Swallows compete with bluebirds for nest boxes. That problem can be reduced by placing two nest boxes within 15 feet of each other. A Tree Swallow that claims one box does not allow other Tree Swallows to use the nearby box. The swallow will allow bluebirds to use it. In effect the swallow protects the bluebirds from being driven out by swallows when two boxes are placed near one another.

Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary’s field has experienced plant succession with the invasion of native shrubs and trees. The shrubs have driven swallows out and bluebirds have not used some boxes meant for them. We have begun clearing shrubs and trees from the field to create more open habitat. Hopefully we will once again entice swallows and keep the bluebirds nesting here. In one area where bluebirds stopped nesting, I cleared an area around the nest box and the next year bluebirds began using the box again. 

Birds like Black-capped Chickadees, Tufted Titmice, and White-breasted Nuthatches nest in cavities in wooded areas. I place houses in the woods for their consideration. Birdhouse boards are often about a half inch thick. We have placed predator guards on the boxes. It is an additional board that makes the entrance hole about one inch deep. Animals, like raccoons that reach in, cannot bend their leg to reach the eggs or young birds. 

The boxes are placed in locations away from heavy human traffic. When close to human activity, birds are often alarmed and leave the nest box when people approach. It interrupts egg incubation. 

Many designs offer selection options for nesting. The entrance hole size is important to prevent unwanted species from entering. Sometimes wrens, that are smaller than bluebirds, enter and kill bluebirds. Instead of a round or oval opening, a rectangular slit is used. It allows the bluebird to escape instead of being trapped by an invading wren. If an entrance hole is too large, European Starlings can enter and kill resident birds. 

Last year’s nest material should be removed from boxes so birds can start fresh with new materials that are fungus and parasite free. Cleaning nest boxes removes health hazards like mice turds or bird droppings. Wear rubber gloves and a facemask for your own protection when cleaning nests. Mice often occupy nest boxes during the winter and they can carry diseases to avoid like Hantavirus. 

One time near the edge of an invading forest, I found Southern Flying Squirrels using one of the nest boxes. Having lots of nest boxes provides opportunities for many species to nest. It is a joy to serve nature niche needs for a diversity of animals. 

Carrol Henderson wrote a book titled Woodworking for Wildlife. It is available from the Minnesota DNR. It provides the plans for making different wildlife nest boxes. If you haven’t cleaned nest boxes this spring, I recommend completing the task before the end of March. Install more boxes to provide nesting cavities.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

Posted in Ranger Steve's Nature NicheComments (0)

100th Birthday


Friends and family are invited to a 100th birthday party for Elna Johnson on Saturday, March 24th at Courtland Oakfield United Methodist Church from 1 pm to 4 pm. No gifts please.

Posted in BirthdayComments (0)



Mr. Richard Lee Dines of Cedar Springs, Michigan, age 83, passed away Monday, March 12, 2018. He was born in Rockford, Michigan to Frank and Bernadine (Tenhoppen) Dines on May 20, 1934. Richard enjoyed hunting, fishing, bingo, and bowling. He also was a devoted Cubs fan. Richard worked for Steelcase for over thirty years. Richard is survived by his children, Rodney (Laurie) Dines, Ricky Dines, Margie Cole, and Russell (friend Tammy) Dines; eleven grandchildren; thirty great-grandchildren; brothers, Norman Dines, Jack Dines; sisters, Ruth (Bill) Hiler, Jill (Vern) Smith. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife Shirley in 2014 after sixty-one years of marriage; son, Richard Dines, Jr.; brothers, Carl Dines, Paul Dines, and Tom Dines. There will be a time of visitation with Richard’s family from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Pederson Funeral Home, 127 N. Monroe Street NE, Rockford, MI 49341. The funeral service for Richard will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, March 16, 2018 at Pederson Funeral Home. There will be also be a time of visitation one hour prior to the funeral. Memorial contributions in Richard’s name can be made to Metron of Cedar Springs, 400 Jeffrey St NE, Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)


Shelby Laurence Reyburn was born on October 15, 1932, son of Shelby John Reyburn and Edith Burnap. He passed away quietly in his sleep Saturday, March 10, 2018. Larry graduated from Cedar Springs High School in 1950 and worked as a cashier for Meijer. He attended Davenport College in Grand Rapids before being drafted into the US Army. After basic training at Camp Atterburg, Indiana, he served as infantry in Korea, attaining the rank of Sergeant First Class. He married Janice Evelyn Blaesi on June 17, 1955. In 1956 he entered the State Police Academy in Lansing, Michigan, and after graduation served at Ionia, St. Ignace, and Ithaca as a trooper. He was promoted to Detective in 1969 and assigned to State Police Intelligence in Lansing. After his promotion to Detective/Sgt in that unit he transferred in 1972 to the Fire Marshall Division in Lansing. He was promoted again to Detective/Lieutenant in 1980. In 1981 he transferred back to the Intelligence Division and organized the W.E.M.E.T Drug team for West Michigan. Larry retired from the State Police in 1982. Farming was always close to Larry’s heart. He bought the family farm from his parents in 1968, grew apples, and moved there in 1976. When he retired, he and Janice entered the flower business, growing, drying, and marketing dried flowers, which they did for 20 years, as well as 2 acres of pumpkins. He grew a beautiful garden for family and friends, using it as the opportunity to work with his four grandsons who lived next door, training them to work hard and teaching many life lessons. Since 1984, he and Janice spent their winters at their home in Nokomis, Florida, where they were members of Covenant Life Presbyterian Church in Sarasota, Florida. In Michigan, they attended Blythefield Hills Baptist Church in Rockford, Michigan, but their true membership is in Heaven. Larry was excited and comforted to be moving to his new residence in Heaven with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Larry is survived by his wife, Janice, son Dean (Martha) Reyburn and daughter Joanne (Joseph) Pann. His grandchildren Nathanael, Noah, Aaron, and Andrew Reyburn, Jessie, Jacob, and Jebedia Pann, and 11 great-grandchildren. His grandson Joseph Pann and older sisters Genevie Penrose and Florence Yurich preceded him in death. Visitation is 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15 at Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. Visitation at Blythefield Hills Baptist Church in Rockford, Michigan at 10 a.m. prior to the 11a.m. Funeral on Friday, March 16, 2018. In lieu of flowers send donations to Faith Hospice of Grand Rapids or BHBC missionaries.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)



Mr. Robert H. Fuller of Cedar Springs, Michigan, aged 83, passed into his Glory on March 9, 2018, after a three-year struggle with myasthenia gravis. Robert is survived by his wife of 61½ years, Mary Lou; children, Mark Fuller, MD of Ironwood, Michigan, Scott Fuller and Barbara (Greg) Vanderkooi of Cedar Springs; grandchildren, Gabriel (Dana) Morris, Joshua Morris, Kati Fuller, Alice and Livia Fuller, Jack (Sophia Rykert) Vanderkooi, and Cheryl Vanderkooi; great-grandchildren, Madilynn and Gabrielle Morris, Kira, Laney, Jackson, and Grayson Vanderkooi; brother-in-law William (Barb) Haroff; sisters-in-law Edith (Alvin) Rector, Shirley DuBridge, and Verna (Stephen) Johnson; two special people, Megan Lewis and Beverly Harris; many loved nieces and nephews who were able to be with him during his last struggle; and his faithful companion, BUD the Pug, affectionately known as “Bob’s Ugly Dog.” He was preceded in death by his son, Kris Fuller; parents, Rev. H. Howard and Beulah Fuller; sisters Patricia Moore, Carolyn Decker, Martha Haroff; and in-laws Grant and Edna Ranney. Robert was a man of many trades during his working years. He retired as a rural mail carrier from Cedar Springs— a job he loved. He was also a member of Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church for fifty years, where he had held many positions, and loved his church family dearly. Relatives and friends may call on the family during a time of visitation from 2:00 until 4:00 p.m. and from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, 2018, at Pederson Funeral Home, 127 N. Monroe Street NE, Rockford, MI 49341. The memorial service for Robert will be celebrated by Pastors Kim DeLong, Chuck Smith, and Thurlan Meredith at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, March 23, 2018, at Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake Avenue NE, Rockford, MI 49341. There will be a one-hour visitation prior to the service at church. Those wishing to offer an expression of sympathy are encouraged to make a memorial contribution to the Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Memorial Fund; or to the Mary Free Bed Foundation, 235 Wealthy Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)



Thor N. TerHaar, age 54, passed away peacefully on Friday, March 9, 2018. He was born July 20, 1963 in Grand Rapids to Gordon and Nancy (Kruger)TerHaar. He was preceded in death by his father, Gordon. He is survived by his daughter, Amber TerHaar; mother, Nancy Kruger; brothers, Scott TerHaar, Thad Kruger; sister, Tina Ward; several nieces, nephews and friends. As Thor had wished, cremation has taken place. A memorial service for Thor will be held on Saturday, March 17, 2018 at Cedar Creek Community Church, 2969 14 Mile Rd. Sparta, from 2-6:00 p.m. with a luncheon served from 2-4:00 p.m. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to Assist the Family with Expenses.

Arrangements by Hessel-Cheslek Funeral Home, Sparta

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

Kent Theatre
Advertising Rates Brochure

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!