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Three hurt in rollover crash

This pickup truck rolled Friday morning, June 10, injuring the female driver and two young passengers. Post photo by J. Reed.

This pickup truck rolled Friday morning, June 10, injuring the female driver and two young passengers.

Three hurt in rollover crash

A woman and two children were sent to the hospital on Friday morning, June 10, after their truck rolled on 17 Mile in Solon Township.

The crash occurred shortly before 10:30 a.m., in front of 1750 17 Mile Road, east of Lime Lake Rd. According to Joshua Roney, of Kent City, he was heading westbound on 17 Mile in his Ford F350 pickup, and was turning left into the driveway, where he works, when another pickup behind him tried to go around him and clipped his back bumper. “She was going way too fast,” he said.

The other pickup then rolled.

The call came into 911 saying passengers had been ejected. According to the Michigan State Police, a young female passenger, Gabby Olvera, 9, of Kent City, was ejected. The other two, driver Debbie Monroe, 58, of Sparta, and a young male, Gustafo Olvera 10, were not ejected.

According to Lt. Chris Paige, with Solon Fire and Rescue, the female driver, grandmother of the two children, was transported to the hospital by Rockford Ambulance with serious injuries, and the two children were transported with non-life threatening injuries.

The Michigan State Police said that the Monroe was cited for being unable to stop in an assured clear distance.

Assisting the MSP at the scene was the Kent County Sheriff Department, Solon Fire and Rescue, Algoma Fire and Rescue, and Rockford Ambulance.

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Get on your mark, get set, READ!

Animals from Double K Farm are always a hit at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program at the Cedar Springs Library. Courtesy photo. Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

Animals from Double K Farm are always a hit at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program at the Cedar Springs Library. Courtesy photo.

Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

Kids really enjoy the ice cream at the kickoff of the Summer Reading program. Courtesy photo.

The Cedar Springs Public Library was on fire with enthusiasm Monday, June 13, as the Library kicked off its spectacular Summer Reading Program. The clouds and brief rain could not dampen the spirits of the 625 participants of this community affair. Families made their way to the Library from noon to 6 p.m. to sign up for a summer of fun, reading, great programs and prizes. Themed book bags, compliments of ChoiceOne Bank, for K-12thgrades, were filled with reading logs and books, as patrons made their way out to the yard to climb aboard Fire Truck #8 and the Rescue Squad vehicle, get free ice cream donated by Classic Kelly’s Restaurant, purchase books from the Friends of the Library book sale, pet the animals from Double K Farm and interact with Animal Junction 4H students.

Community Partners were out in force for the day to assist –members of various businesses, Cedar Springs Fire department volunteers, teen volunteers, and parents working together with Library staff to make the day memorable. Already 753 children and adults have signed up, a new record for opening week.

Over $400 was taken in Monday as raffle tickets were sold to add to the $500+ already sold. A Stihl Blower and Trimmer, valued at over $700, and donated by Bill Shallman, Manager of Weingartz of Cedar Springs, were placed on display at Independent Bank and chances to support the building of the new Cedar Springs Community Library actively promoted by bank staff. Winners at the end of the day were Kenneth Kent, blower, and David Twining, trimmer. Kenneth bought 2 tickets and David $5 worth of tickets. I guess you really never know—it really could only take one ticket to win!

The new library was proudly displayed all day at the event. The brick, windows, roof—the outside make-up of the library was chosen last month by the Library Board, so the new rendering of the library was complete a few weeks ago. Library staff have been shared it enthusiastically to everyone! On June 27, the Library Board will vote on the building company who will get the contract to begin construction sometime around mid-July. Library staff had a great time telling families that next year we will have our summer reading program in our new library.

If you haven’t signed up, get on over to the Cedar Springs Library and sign up for over 35 great prizes and Wednesday weekly programs, plus 25 other special programs to happen for ages 8 through adults. Preschoolers have special programs on Fridays at 11:15 a.m. on the Library grounds, as well. For more information and a calendar of events, go to the Library’s website:  cedarspringslibrary.org. Follow our summer reading theme, Fitness and Nutrition. “On Your Mark, Get Set, READ!”

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Chamber kicks off summer with Renaissance Faire

The Wonder elixir comedy team kept the crowd entertained at the CS Renaissance Faire. Photo by J. Reed. A woman in Victorian dress and an elf from Middle Earth were seen at the Ren Faire last weekend. Post photo by J. Reed. Kids had a blast playfighting with toy swords and other middle age weaponry. Post photo by J. Reed.

The Wonder elixir comedy team kept the crowd entertained at the CS Renaissance Faire. Photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs Area Chamber kicked off their summer events with the third annual Cedar Springs Renaissance Faire last weekend.

The event took place in Morley Park Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Friday’s fun ended with the showing of the 1951 version of “Alice in Wonderland” in the park. Two more movies are planned for July and August.

There was entertainment all weekend, with concessions all day Saturday and Sunday. Actors, vendors, and several attendees were dressed in a myriad of costumes—royalty and swordsmen from the Middle Ages; fairies; Middle Earth; Victorian; and more. There was also a royal dinner on Saturday.

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A woman in Victorian dress and an elf from Middle Earth were seen at the Ren Faire last weekend. Post photo by J. Reed.

About 20-25 vendors attended the event.

The Colony of Larpcraft was a big hit with the kids. They were able to go into a roped off area where they could pretend to fight each other with toy swords and other middle age weapons. They could also buy a toy sword to take home. Knockerball, which was there on Sunday, was also a hit with kids.

Kids had a blast playfighting with toy swords and other middle age weaponry. Post photo by J. Reed.

Kids had a blast playfighting with toy swords and other middle age weaponry. Post photo by J. Reed.

According to Chamber president Perry Hopkins, he was happy with the way the event turned out. “We put the vendors in a circle this year to improve traffic flow, which made the vendors happy, and more people turned out for the event, especially on Saturday.”

Hopkins said they had about 200 on Friday, 350 or more on Saturday, and 200-250 on Sunday. “It’s really hard to tell since we don’t have a gate or admission to enter,” he said.

“I want to thank all the volunteered to make it happen, those that did role playing, and those that came out and took part in it,” said Hopkins.

He noted that they plan to have it again next year, and that several vendors are already signed up to come back.

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Cedar View principal to take job in Hudsonville

Andrew Secor

Andrew Secor

By Judy Reed

Cedar Springs Public Schools is saying goodbye to another administrator. Andrew Secor, principal at Cedar View and an 18-year employee of the district, is leaving to become principal at Jamestown Upper Elementary for Hudsonville Public Schools.

“I’ve really enjoyed my time in Cedar Springs as a coach, teacher, and principal,” said Secor.

He was just 22-years old and fresh out of college when he landed a job at Cedar Springs Public Schools as assistant varsity basketball coach to Dave Schlump.

“I coached for 14 years, six as Dave’s assistant and eight as the head coach. I was fortunate to work with so many great players, as we won 10 district titles and three league championships during that time frame. One of my favorite memories of that time was working with an amazing coach staff that had such deep Cedar Springs pride,” he remarked.

Two years after being hired as assistant basketball coach, Secor was hired as a teacher at Cedar Trails. He taught at Cedar Trails for six years, then Beach for four years. He then became assistant principal at Cedar Trails for two years, and was a principal at Cedar View for four years.

“I have had the opportunity to work with hundreds of educators, and thousands of students and parents,” noted Secor. “The mark they have left on me will last forever. I have had some amazing mentors and role models from within this community that have helped to grow me as a leader and as a man.”

The Post asked what were some of Secor’s favorite moments and what will he miss? “My favorite moments are all about people,” he explained. “This is truly the best profession in the world and it’s all founded on relationships. I will remember the daily interactions with students, the great administrative team I was a part of, and working with teachers to provide the best possible education for students. The people of this community is what drew me in and the people of this community are what I will miss the most. Some of my greatest friends and mentors live right here in Cedar Springs.”

He also had some kind words for the people that work at Cedar View. “I am so proud of the staff at Cedar View. It is a talented, smart, and dedicated group that I am going to miss dearly. They bought into the vision I had for the building, we accomplished some amazing things, and they will continue to accomplish many more.”

The Post also asked Secor what words he might have for the community. “While it saddens me that many outstanding educators have left the district recently, this is a strong staff and community which will continue to serve students to the best of their ability,” he said.

How does Secor want people to remember him? “I pray that I have left a meaningful and positive impact on those around me. Through the celebrations and challenges of the last 18 years, I have always done everything I could to help students and players, both academically as well as emotionally. The reason this profession is the greatest in the world is that it is all about relationships and the daily opportunity you have to make the lives of people around you better. That is what drove me everyday, to help teachers, parents, and students, have a better life and to make Cedar Springs the best school district we possibly could be.”

Andy Secor and family

Andy Secor and family

While sad to be leaving Cedar Springs, Secor is excited about what his  new position has to offer. “It is an amazing opportunity for my family and I. Hudsonville has a dynamic administrative team, I get to work with an outstanding principal who is at Jamestown Lower Elementary, and all I hear about is how amazing the Jamestown teaching staff is. Jamestown is ranked in the 99th percentile for student achievement in the state of Michigan and I relish the opportunity to lead a new team that has already accomplished so much.”

He also said that he and his wife are excited about the academic and athletic opportunities that Hudsonville will provide their children. But he doesn’t take for granted what they have been given here.

“It has been a great place for my children to receive a high quality education, while being cared for and loved, and making lifelong friends. I don’t take for granted the impact that teachers, principals, and community members have played in helping my children to become better people. Thank you to everyone who has played a role in their lives,” he remarked.

“My family and I are excited for the next chapter of our journey as we head to Hudsonville. But Cedar Springs will forever have a place in our hearts.”

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Post travels to Panamá

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Mikalah Gribbell, of Trufant, and currently a senior at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, is majoring in premedical preparation and biology with minors in Spanish and chemistry. For one week this May, she traveled with the Ball State chapter of Global Brigades on a medical/dental brigade, and took the Post with her.

“Global Brigades is an international organization that works to bring volunteers to underserved and undeveloped areas of the world such as Africa and central and South America,” she explained. “As an organization, they target communities that are willing to work to become more developed and self-sustaining. The organization sends medical, public health, water, environmental, business, micro finance, and human rights brigades to these communities and eventually the communities are brought up to a self-sustaining level where they have a true economy and individuals have hygienic facilities in their homes, access to healthcare and legal support, and the potential for future growth and development.”

Her brigade worked in the Coclé region of West Panamá. “In three days, (with the help of American and Panamanian doctors and dentists) we provided basic healthcare and dentistry services for 432 people. As needed, we filled prescriptions for blood pressure medicines, anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, anti-parasitic medications, and allergy medicines. We also taught classes about proper hygiene, sexually transmitted diseases, and caring for aches and pains.” She said that as a group, they also spent one day helping families build hygienic latrines and showers. “The experience was incredible and highly rewarding,” she remarked. “The Panamanian people were beyond grateful for our help, and are looking forward to the other brigades that will visit their communities. I hope to expand on this experience as I approach a career in medicine and consider working in rural/underserved communities in America.”

Thank you, Mikalah, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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MDOT improves safety for older drivers

 

A recent study by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and Western Michigan University shows new signs and signals make roads safer for older drivers. Michigan’s aging population has resulted in an increase in the number of older drivers involved in traffic crashes. The number of drivers age 65 and older involved in crashes in Michigan increased by 2.4 percent from 2004 to 2013, even as the number of all drivers involved in crashes dropped by 23.8 percent during the same period.

In 2004, MDOT began implementing engineering countermeasures addressing the needs of older drivers.

• The use of Clearview font on guide signs, which improve legibility by minimizing blurring around the edges of the letters.

• The use of fluorescent yellow sheeting, a new, brighter color for warning signs that is more visible.

• Box span signal configuration, in which traffic signals are suspended along all four sides of an intersection, to improving safety and visibility.

• Pedestrian countdown signals, which show the number of seconds remaining to safely cross the roadway. These signals help pedestrians decide whether to start crossing an intersection or adjust their walking speed.

• Arrow-per-lane signing, which clarifies navigation paths with a directional arrow above each limited access highway lane.

Kimberly Lariviere, MDOT Strategic Highway Safety engineer, is the project manager.

“The benefit-cost ratio for all of these previously used devices was very good, and some were exceptional,” Lariviere said. “This research confirms that the improvements MDOT started making 11 years ago for older drivers were wise investments that we should continue implementing.”

The improvements were reviewed in two ways. Researchers surveyed 1,590 Michigan drivers and pedestrians in Detroit, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, and Lansing to learn their perceptions of the improvements. Historical crash data, before and after implementation, also was analyzed to determine the impacts of the improvements on safety.

The surveys revealed drivers preferred the improvements over the traditional alternatives. Data analysis showed all five improvements offered cost-effective ways to reduce crash rates among all drivers, specifically among older drivers.

This project confirms that all five of the improvements studied provided good safety benefits for the amount of money invested, and several produced exceptional benefit-cost ratios. Researchers recommend continuing to install them in appropriate locations.

More details are available in the MDOT research spotlight report “Evaluation of Michigan’s Engineering Improvements for Older Drivers” online. www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/RC1636_Spotlight_506683_7.pdf

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Fun on the lake

Sand Lake Elementary 5th grade students in Mrs. Karhoff, Mrs. Parkhoff and Mrs. Scott’s class celebrated the last days of school by completing an engineering challenge. Students were asked to work in teams to design a boat made from cardboard, duct tape and plastic, which could support two people. Boats were put to the test on Sand Lake at a year-end picnic last week. The design teams “Money Machine” and “Sharknado” came in first and second place.

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United Methodist Church to Celebrate Sesquicentennial 

The original Methodist Episcopal Church built on the corner of Main and Church Streets in Cedar Springs. Its cornerstone was laid August 17, 1870 and the church was dedicated June 7, 1871. This newly built Methodist church cost $6000 and was the tallest building north of Grand Rapids in 1871. The spire with the bell tower could be seen for miles.

The original Methodist Episcopal Church built on the corner of Main and Church Streets in Cedar Springs. Its cornerstone was laid August 17, 1870 and the church was dedicated June 7, 1871. This newly built Methodist church cost $6000 and was the tallest building north of Grand Rapids in 1871. The spire with the bell tower could be seen for miles.

by Sue Harrison

The roots of religious heritage in Cedar Springs are as deep and long as the history of the people who settled it. No group or community can survive long without some common belief or religions commitment to bind them together.

The very first sermon in Cedar Springs was preached in 1855 by a Methodist Episcopal preacher, Rev. W. W. Johnson, a circuit rider. Those services were held in the little log schoolhouse, which was then located on the southeast corner of Main and Muskegon Streets. A class of eight persons formed and continued to be served by Laphamville Circuit riders. (Laphamville was the original name for Rockford, Mich.)

The Methodist Episcopal Society was organized on October 6, 1866, with Preacher in Charge, Rev Burton Smith, along with four circuit riders who served eight other outposts in the North Kent area. Thus, the Methodist Episcopal Church became the second organized church in Cedar Springs.

This year, 2016, marks a milestone for the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, which will be celebrating 150 years serving Cedar Springs through Christian worship. As part of its Sesquicentennial celebration, the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church has planned the following events open to the public throughout the summer and fall.

June 25 – Following a week of Vacation Bible School, there will be a Field Day held at Skinner Field with games, bounce house, and face painting. Hot dogs, chips and water will be provided.

July 31 – Hymn Sing and Ice Cream Social held at the church.

August 28 – Tent Revival in Morley Park, with hot dogs, chips, and water served afterward.

Oct. 1 – Red Flannel Day. Parade entry of circuit rider and a horse-drawn float.

Oct. 16 – Jubal Brass Concert at the CS United Methodist Church with a reception following the concert.

Nov. 20 – Rededication of the church cornerstone. Former pastors will be invited. A potluck will be held after the morning church service and before the ceremony.

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City to hold City Manager interviews

 

The Cedar Springs City Council met on Monday, June 6, in closed session to choose four more people to interview for the City Manager position. The names were released on Thursday, June 9, after the nominees agreed to be interviewed. However, two of those selected pulled out on Tuesday, June 14.

The interviews will be held at Cedar Springs City Hall on Friday, June 17. There is a possibility that two more candidates will be added to take the place of the ones who pulled out. The ones currently interviewing will be:

12:30 p.m. Michael Womack, Executive Intern, Village of Lake Orion, MI; Graduate Assistant, City of Eastpointe, MI; Attorney, Womack & Womack P.C.

2:00 p.m. Nancy Stoddard, Tax Collector, City of Wyoming, MI

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Concerts in park kick off summer

Roosevelt Diggs performed at Morley Park last year during concerts in the park.  Post photo by J. Reed.

Roosevelt Diggs performed at Morley Park last year during concerts in the park. Post photo by J. Reed.

Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recreation will kick off their summer series of concerts at Morley Park this Thursday, June 16, with the Oxymorons at 7 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the concerts put on by Cedar Springs Parks and Recreation and sponsored by area businesses give people a chance to relax with friends and family, while listening to some great music.

There are concessions on site, and free raffle tickets give concert-goers a chance to win prizes from area businesses.

Other dates this summer are July 21 with Mane Street, and August 18 with The Cheap Dates.

Be sure to bring a lawn chair. Concerts start at 7 p.m. and admission is free.

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