web analytics

Milk plant planned for Greenville

 

by Paul W. Jackson, Michigan Farm Bureau

A Greenville property has been purchased by Foremost Farms for a dairy processing facility.

Foremost, a dairy cooperative based in Wisconsin, announced its plan Nov. 9 for a plant to “receive up to six million pounds of raw milk per day,” depending on pending “approvals of necessary local and state incentives and support, including a long-term wastewater treatment solution.”

“This facility is planned to be operational in 12-to-14 months and would receive up to six million pounds of raw milk per day,” Foremost said in a press release. “Foremost Farms would initially process milk solids for internal use in farmer-owned production facilities in the Upper Midwest, and for sales to customers and to strategic alliance partners.”

The 96-acre property is currently vacant, Foremost indicated in the press release.

“It is our goal to continue to work with our strategic partners/alliances like we have established in the region with Michigan Milk Producers Association at Constantine, Mich., to maximize dairy farmer investments, stabilize the regional milk market and add value for all producers in this market,” said Foremost CEO Michael Doyle. “Foremost Farms’ executive management and board of directors plans to strategically build this facility in Greenville in order to control our own destiny in Michigan and unify our seven-state membership. All of our members produce high-quality milk, and this facility is part of the plan to optimize that value today and into the future.”

What about cheese?

Whether the announcement slows plans for a cheese plant envisioned by Michigan Milk Producers (MMPA), Dairy Farmers of America (DFA), Foremost and Glanbia, one thing is expected: if the Foremost plant is built, it will absorb nearly all of Michigan’s current milk overproduction.

By taking another 6 million pounds per day of milk from Michigan dairy farms, the planned plant will certainly help farmers, and not just Foremost members, said Chris Wolf, professor of agriculture economics and dairy expert with Michigan State University.

“More processing means less dumping and less distressed sales,” he said. “And we know that Greenville is close to a lot of milk in Clinton, Ionia and Gratiot counties, and it’s not too far from the highway,” he said. “I wouldn’t advise anyone to begin adding cows, but this plant could take a lot of excess milk. Our milk production growth is slowing, but we’re still growing at about 3 percent above national growth. I think this plant is very good news as long as it doesn’t mean something bad for the cheese facility. If we keep growing in milk production, one plant may not make much difference, but it’s good to take the portfolio approach and have multiple things to address the overproduction.” Ken Nobis, president of the MMPA, agreed.

“We will need more than just a cheese plant in Michigan,” he said. “This announcement by Foremost does not put that in jeopardy, but when you have multiple entities involved in building something, that doesn’t shorten the decision-making process. The cheese plant is moving forward, even if there is one less entity involved. It just takes time.”

While dairy farmers will need to exercise some patience while the Foremost plant and a cheese plant moves forward, there is hope for a better future in dairying, said Chuck Courtade, director of customer relations with DFA.

“There is light at the end of the tunnel now,” he said. “I just hope the farmers can hang on during these low prices.”

Courtade said when both the raw milk plant and a cheese plant are up and running, dairymen could expect a pay increase.

“If the excess capacity is gone, it would reduce some deductions of their milk checks,” he said. “If more milk stays here, we might get closer to the federal marketing order price.”

It’s been a long wait, but between Foremost’s announcement and the apparent commitment to a cheese plant in the near future, farmers, and especially Foremost suppliers, are anticipating better times that are nearer than they thought just a few months ago.

“Between the two plants, we should be able to even handle some normal growth,” Courtade said.

Among the things that remain unclear is whether the cheese plant will have Foremost involvement.

“I can’t speak to the joint venture (cheese plant), but I can say that this (raw milk plant) is a totally separate facility, a totally different project,” said Laura Mihm, spokesperson for Foremost. “The Greenville property we closed on is about 27 miles from the epicenter of our members. But we are still talking with our strategic alliance about something in the future. We’re always willing to work with others. That’s the cooperative spirit.”

Mihm would not rule out that co-op’s continued involvement with a cheese plant in Michigan, but she said for now, Foremost is excited for its new unilateral Michigan venture.

“We are incredibly energized by this,” she said.

Reprinted by permission. This article originally appeared on Nov. 10, 2017 at https://www.michfb.com/MI/Farm_News/Content/Markets_and_Weather/Milk_plant_planned_for_Greenville/

Posted in BusinessComments (0)

Spectrum Health United Hospital receives awards 

Spectrum Health United Hospital in Greenville has received the 2018 America’s Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence™ and was also named a recipient of the Healthgrades 2017 Outstanding Patient Experience Award™ as measured by Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals.

The hospital was recognized with five-star ratings for clinical quality achievements in four categories: Treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Treatment of Pneumonia for three years in a row (2016-2018); Treatment of Sepsis for seven years in a row (2012-2018); and Treatment of Respiratory Failure for two years in a row (2017-2018). Patients treated at hospitals receiving a five-star rating have a lower risk of complications during a hospital stay than if they were treated at hospitals receiving a one-star rating in that procedure or condition. 

“We are pleased to be honored by Healthgrades again this year,” said Spectrum Health United Hospital President Andrea Leslie. “We are very proud of our team for their commitment and hard work to ensure quality care and safe outcomes for our patients and their families.”

Healthgrades analyze clinical outcomes (mortality and complications) for each of 34 condition or procedure cohorts. Inclusion criteria for cohort analyses require at least 30 cases across three years of data and at least five cases in the most current year per hospital. As a result, the number of hospitals that qualified and received a rating ranged from a low of 526 rated for bariatric surgery to a high of 4,098 rated for pneumonia. Nearly 5,000 small acute-care hospitals were analyzed for clinical outcomes.

Posted in BusinessComments (0)

Howard City student contributes to art exhibit

 

 

MCC students Makenna Anderson, of Howard City, on left, and Sarah Rittersdorf, of Belding, will present some of their most recent pieces in the Montcalm Community College Winter Artists’ Market Art exhibit.

MCC art exhibit opens Nov. 20

Montcalm Community College presents its annual Winter Artists’ Market art exhibit and sale Nov. 20-21, Nov. 27-30 and Dec. 4-7.

The exhibit features artwork created by MCC students, the MCC Art Club and local artists for viewing and for sale. The event is from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Instruction North Building on MCC’s Sidney campus. Admission is free.

MCC students Makenna Anderson, of Howard City, and Sarah Rittersdorf, of Belding, are currently taking Introduction to Art with MCC Art Instructor Debbie Bell. 

“I never had a chance to take an art class in high school, so I figured now would be the best time to get a good underlying base for my art education before I head off to a university,” Anderson said.

Anderson is also in Drawing I with MCC Art Instructor Carolyn Johnson. 

“As the K-12 curriculum gets narrower due to budget cuts and continuous standardized testing, MCC can be the open door to quality higher education in the arts,” Johnson said. 

“As time goes on, I see more and more students like Makenna who have not had access to art classes before coming to MCC,” she added. “It’s sad to see gifted and motivated students denied opportunities, but how wonderful that we have MCC to be a leader in arts education for our community.”

Anderson and Rittersdorf both plan to create art for a living.

“Both student artists have had a passion for and interest in art prior to this class, but practice has helped them to see more and grow as artists,” Bell said.

“I want to be an artist for a living, so putting my pieces in this exhibit will be a good experience,” Rittersdorf said.

Anderson said the exhibit is also beneficial for the community.

“Art is such a wonderful thing,” Anderson added. “I think the exhibit is a great way for others to experience art created by those in our community.”

For more information about the exhibit, contact Johnson at cjohnson@montcalm.edu or (989) 328-1248. 

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, FeaturedComments (0)

Christmas fund distribution

 

Due to the generosity of the late Evelyn Cossin, there are limited funds available again this year to assist some families in need for Christmas.  The funds are available only to families living in the Cedar Springs city limits. Please send or bring letters requesting assistance to: Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, 140 S. Main St., PO Box K, Cedar Springs, MI 49319, C/O – Church Secretary. 

 All letters should include some brief summary of your need for assistance and a phone number you can be reached at. All letters MUST include a contact number to be considered. Letters must be submitted and post marked and received no later than, Friday, December 1. 

**Note: If awarded some assistance, we will notify you of your pick up times of 10 a.m.-noon on Wednesday, December 13 at Cedar Springs UMC. 

All letters received will receive some notification of acceptance or denial of assistance.

Posted in Arts & EntertainmentComments (0)

Traveling too light

 

A porter loaded down with suitcases followed the couple to the airline check-in counter. 

As they approached the line, the husband glanced at the pile of luggage and said to his wife, “Why didn’t you bring the piano, too?”

“Are you trying to be funny?” she replied.

“No, I really wish you had,” he groaned.  “I left the tickets on it.”

Posted in Joke of the WeekComments (0)

Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.


17th Annual Holiday Bazaar

Nov. 18: Courtland Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake Rd., Rockford (between 12 and 13 Mile Rd.) will be hosting its 17th Annual Holiday Bazaar on November 18th from 9 am to 3 pm. 35+ crafters/artists, Granny’s Attic, Bake Sale, Cookies by the pound. Lunch is served 11 am – 2 pm. The bazaar is FREE – no cover charge. For info call Dawna: 616-866-0648. #45,46b

Pine Ridge Bible Camp Auction

Nov. 18: Pine Ridge Bible Camp’s annual Live and Silent Auction will be held on Saturday, November 18th at the Cedar Springs High School. Registration begins at 5:30 pm with the silent auction starting around 6:30 pm. Appetizers will be served throughout the evening. For more information, please call 616-696-8675 or info@pineridgecamp.com. Adult only event. #45,46b

GET OUTSIDE with Stewardship Sundays

Nov. 19: Join the Naturalists at Wittenbach Wege Center, 11715 Vergennes SE, Lowell, on Sunday afternoons 2-3:30pm for a short hike and learn different land management techniques through stewardship. Participants should meet at the center shortly before 2pm. Registration is not required. November is Wild Turkeys and December is White-tailed Deer. The center is open 1-4pm on Sundays. #46

Dinner at the Legion

Nov. 20: American Legion, 80 S. Main St. Cedar Springs, is hosting a Roast Beef dinner on Monday, November 20th, from 5 – 7 pm. Included will be mashed potatoes & gravy, veggies, salad, roll, dessert and drink. The cost is $9 for adults, children (15 and younger) $4.00. Come and enjoy home cooking. Take out is available. 616-696-9160.  #46

TOPS weight loss support group

Nov. 21: Need help getting through the holiday season? Take off pounds sensibly (TOPS), a non-profit weight loss support group for men and women, meets every Tuesday at the Resurrection Lutheran Church in Sand Lake. Your first visit is free so come check out what TOPS can do to help you reach your weigh loss goals! Weigh-ins 8:15-9am, meeting starts at 9:15am. In case of inclement weather, meetings are cancelled if Tri-County or Cedar Springs schools are closed. Call Martha at 696-1039 for more information. #46

Michigan Blood Drive

November 21: A Michigan Blood Drive will be held on November 21st. at the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church from 12:30 pm until 7 pm. Receive a FREE 10-12 lb. Open Acres or Spartan brand turkey at participating stores as our thanks for giving. ALSO, cookies baked by the Cedar Springs Women’s Club members will be served. More important, what a way to give Thanks by donating your blood to help 3 other Michiganders who need blood.  It will take only one hour of your time. The Blood Center thanks all the people that donate at the Cedar Springs blood drive. #46

Black Friday: Prairie Planting at Saul Lake Bog

Nov. 24: Land Conservancy of West Michigan and the Wittenbach Wege Center in Lowell invite you to get outside on Black Friday, November 24, 10am-12pm. On Black Friday, while others are fighting the crowds and the chaos of busy stores, we offer the chance to get outside and be a part of a project that will last for generations by helping to spread seed on the new prairie plots at Saul Lake Bog. Please RSVP at: https://naturenearby.org/events/black-friday-planting/. Tools, work gloves, water, and snacks will be provided. #46  

Posted in Hometown HappeningsComments (0)

One killed in rollover crash on Northland Drive

Police believe that alcohol and poor road conditions contributed to a fatal crash Thursday evening on Northland Drive, north of 18 Mile Rd, in Nelson Township.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, Patrick Todd Brecken, 21, of Plainfield Township, was headed south on Northland Drive, about 10 p.m. on Thursday, November 9, when his 1999 Ford Mustang left the roadway and rolled several times before landing in the ditch on the northbound side of the road. Brecken was ejected from the car and suffered fatal injuries.

The two teenage passengers in the vehicle, Jonathan Michael Brecken, 15, of Grand Haven, and Trey Brian Street, 17, of Cedar Springs, suffered minor injuries and were transported to Butterworth Hospital by Rockford Ambulance.

The Cedar Springs Fire Department assisted at the scene.

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Suspect stabbed during domestic assault

Kent County Sheriff Deputies responded to a stabbing in the 400 block of Sarah Street Friday morning, November 3. Post photo by J. Reed.

Tyler John Bouwens has been arrested on domestic assault charges.

A Cedar Springs man underwent surgery Friday morning after he was reportedly stabbed with a knife during a domestic assault. On Saturday, he was arrested.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, they were dispatched to a call about 7:30 a.m. Friday, November 3, on a stabbing that occurred in the 400 block of Sarah Street, in Cedar Springs Mobile Estates. When deputies arrived they found Tyler John Bouwens, 25, of Cedar Springs, with a stab wound in his upper torso. He was transported by ambulance to Butterworth Hospital where he underwent surgery.

Detective Joe Abram told the Post at the scene that they had people in custody but the investigation was not complete. 

According to a news release issued by the KCSD, police spoke to two people near the scene, and detectives later interviewed them at the Kent County Sheriff Department. They were then released.

According to a family friend, Bouwens was assaulting his ex-girlfriend, and threatening to kill her and their children and blow up their mobile home. The friend said that another family member of the woman reportedly stabbed him to get Bouwens off of her. Just prior to the incident, another male at the scene was also reportedly assaulted by Bouwens.

The friend said that the police had also escorted Bouwens out the day before for threatening the woman.

The KCSD Scientific Support Unit and a KCSD K-9 deputy also responded to the scene. Also assisting on scene was the Cedar Springs Fire Department and Rockford Ambulance. 

Bouwens was arraigned on Sunday, November 5, and charged with interfering with a 911 call; then on Monday, November 6, he was charged with one count of domestic violence; one count of assault and battery; and one count of assault/resist/obstructing a police officer. His bond was set at $10,000 cash/surety. As of Wednesday evening, November 8, he was still in custody at the Kent County Correctional Facility. According to police, no other charges will be brought against anyone in the case.

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

Veterans Day

Saturday, November 11, is Veterans Day. We set this day aside to thank the men and women who have served and are still in the service of our country. We thank them for the sacrifice that both they and their families have made, so that we can remain the land of the free, the home of the brave.

President George Washington showed remarkable insight when he spoke about the country’s treatment of veterans: “The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive the veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their nation.”

What have you done for a veteran you know?

In this week’s Post, we have a special section featuring the men and women who have served during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. These are the Hometown Heroes that we run in our paper throughout the year. There are also a few veterans recognized from other wars or times of service. If you see one of these veterans, or know of others who have served, please be sure to thank them! 

Click link below to download our special Veteran’s Day pullout section.

VeteransDay2017

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

It’s never too late to thank a veteran 

Honoring service men and women at end-of-life

Ron Nitchie, spiritual care advisor for Hospice of Michigan and US Air Force veteran, pins an American flag on Nicholas Smith, a 100 year old who served from 1941 to 1946 in the United States Army Air Corps. The veterans pinning ceremony is part of the We Honor Veterans program, of which Hospice of Michigan is a Level Four participant.

From Hospice of Michigan

All his life, Lewis Woodruff was proud of his service as a United States Army Air Forces crew chief. Between 1944 and 1946, he worked on the B-17 and B-28 bombers used during WWII, sacrificing and dedicating his life to his country. After his discharge from the Army Air Forces, Lewis built a house in Southfield, where he and his wife, Helen, would spend the next seven decades raising seven children, who gave them 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

Lewis lived a good life.

He enjoyed being a veteran and was a member of AMVETS and the American Legion. While he never spoke of the details, Lewis would fondly remark about his time in the service.

Ron Nitchie, a United States Air Force veteran and spiritual care advisor for Arbor Hospice and Hospice of Michigan, had the privilege of supporting Lewis in his final days. Coupled with his own military experience and clinical pastoral education training from the VA hospital in Detroit, Ron provides special assistance and spiritual guidance to help veteran patients, like Lewis, at the end-of-life.

Veterans who work or volunteer with hospice have the unique ability to relate and connect with other veterans at a critical time in life due to their shared military training and history. They share a cultural bond that opens a door of trust and communication, as they understand each other’s physical (war injuries) and emotional needs (survivor guilt, post-traumatic disorder, etc.).

Part of support Ron provides to veteran patients involves pinning ceremonies for members of all the military branches. When Ron learned of Lewis’ service to his country, he offered his family the opportunity to honor Lewis with an American flag pin and a certificate to honor and thank him for his service.

With Lewis in his hospital bed, located in the family room of the house he built in 1946, his wife Helen, and daughters Lori and Lisa, gathered with the HOM care team at his bedside, as Ron read the words of appreciation on the certificate aloud.

“We pay special tribute to you for your military service to America, and for advancing the universal hope of freedom and liberty for all,” said Ron as he placed an American flag pin on Lewis’s hospital gown. Asked if he still loved his country Lewis, holding back tears through his closed eyes, responded with a resounding “yes.”

During the final moments of that pinning ceremony, Ron succeeded in getting Lewis to open his eyes for a moment to see Ron saluting him. Lewis proudly saluted back, as a WWII Army Air Forces veteran.

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), one out of every four dying Americans is a veteran. For Hospice of Michigan, veterans account for 25 percent of all its patients. The nonprofit hospice agency offers enhanced care specifically designed to meet the unique needs of veteran patients, celebrating and honoring those who have served in the U.S. military through pinning ceremonies, like the one that paid tribute to Lewis Woodruff.

Through We Honor Veterans, a program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Hospice of Michigan integrates veteran-specific content into training staff members and volunteers, and educates its patients and their families on services and benefits offered to members of the military. The organization makes every effort to pair veteran patients with those who have a military service background. Hospice of Michigan is proud of its Level Four status with We Honor Veterans, which signifies the organization has met the highest standards set by the VA and NHPCO for this national program.

As America celebrates Veterans Day on Nov. 11, Hospice of Michigan extends special appreciation to all military service members and their families for their sacrifice to protect the freedom of others. For information about Hospice of Michigan and its involvement with We Honor Veterans, please visit www.hom.org.

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

advert
Kent Theatre
Advertising Rates Brochure

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!