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DONALD TIBBE

41-C-Mem-Tibbe-web

October 15, 2003

 

I pray you’ll be our eyes,

And watch us where we go.

I pray we’ll find your light

And Hold it in our hearts.

Help us find a place,

Guide us with your grace,

Give us faith so we’ll be safe.

Sadly missed by his wife, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

 

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Peanut butter pews

Hillcrest-Church-picPastor Kristi J. Rhodes  

Hillcrest Community Church

5994 18 Mile Rd. Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

Over the years, I have had the privilege of being used by God to help many people, marriages, and families through some very hard seasons in their lives. Too often, people get stuck in a bad place and really struggle to find a way out. In many cases, some have resigned themselves to give up, believing there is no hope.

As a pastor, my calling is to point them to the hope—Jesus Christ—who is the hope of the world! There is power in the name of Jesus to break every chain and restore hope to those who seem stuck in a bad place. Each new assignment brings its own challenges, but none that God can’t handle, for those who will trust him with the outcome in every situation.

As I was preparing my most favorite sandwich in the whole wide world (Jif peanut butter and almost any flavor of jelly), I was meditating on one of the most recent victories. I was in awe of God, praising Him for His power and thanking Him for trusting me with His precious child. I am amazed yet again of His amazing power to transform relationships for His glory.

The peanut butter on my sandwiches is always quite thick (yum) and I dropped the knife in the middle of the peanut butter and it stuck there. I got the knife out and cleaned the peanut butter off, then the lid to the jelly dropped on the peanut butter and stuck there. My thoughts went to—“hmm, I would like to get stuck in a sea of peanut butter.” Then I was reminded of how often we can get stuck in a good place, too!

We can get so comfortable in our peanut butter pews that we don’t want to go out and reach those who are lost or hurt, depressed, confused, or struggling in relationships, stuck in hopelessness. We can even become a hindrance to those who do. Those who won’t leave their comfort zone have lost sight of why the church exists in the first place. We dishonor God when we refuse to be used to expand His Kingdom.

When God has redeemed us and healed our broken relationships, healed our past hurts and scars, restored our dignity, and written our names in the Lamb’s book of Life, we should be so thankful that we want to help others. Just before Peter would experience the lowest point of his life thus far, Jesus told Peter in Luke 22:31-32, “Satan has asked to sift you as wheat. But I have prayed for you, that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.”

Peter was stuck in the worst place of his life—betrayal of his Lord—until he remembered Jesus’ words. Jesus’ powerful words restored Peter who in turn helped restore and strengthen his brothers. Let us be found faithful to Jesus’ Great Commission to “Go, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely, I am with you always, to the very end of the age” (Matt. 28:19).

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Dancing, not marching

By Ronnie McBrayer

By Ronnie McBrayer

There is a story about two monks walking along the road when they come to a river. A beautiful woman is standing there. She can’t figure out how to continue her journey. So one of the monks picks her up in his arms—something he was absolutely forbidden to do, for touching a woman was against his vows—and he carries her across to the other side. Then, all parties continued on their journey.

After a few hours, the second monk was unable to remain silent about this misconduct. He blurts out, “How could you pick up that woman? It was against the rules!” The first monk replied, “Are you still carrying her around? I put her down hours ago.”

This is an instructive tale about two different approaches to spirituality. One can be mastered by a tightly controlled list of “dos and don’ts,” or one can move with the spirit. While the latter is not without its pitfalls, the former is certainly rife with peril. Managing our spiritual lists becomes a heavy, taxing burden.

Eugene Peterson, in his paraphrase of the Bible called “The Message,” gets right at this by casting new light on Jesus’ words from Matthew 11: “Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. You’ll recover your life…Learn the unforced rhythms of grace.”

The “unforced rhythms of grace.” I don’t think there is a more incomparable phrase, and nothing any higher to which anyone could aspire: to express the life of faith with freedom, harmony, and loving kindness. What liberation; and I’m speaking not simply of Peterson’s translation but the Christ-infused spirit behind the words.

For the way of Jesus is indeed effusive and free-flowing. Nothing about it is coercive, heavy, or manipulative. Jesus does not require the imposition of shame, false guilt, “sacred” extortion, or browbeating to keep people on the path. Maybe that is why “rhythm” is such an appropriate word; because following Jesus is much more like dancing than it is marching.

Do you want to live the free and gracious life? Partner with Jesus. Move with him. Stay in step with him. When the music of mercy plays, follow his lead, and you’ll find yourself enjoying faith rather than enduring it. Following Jesus leads to recovery, not religion; to empowerment, not exhaustion; it leads to the laying down of our burdens. It leads to grace.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, blogger, pastor, and author of multiple books. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.me.  

 

 

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Cedar Springs man among those honored by DNR

 

Pictured here are just four of the more than 40 hunting education instructors statewide honored for 40 years of volunteer service. Pictured (L to R) are DNR Director Keith Creagh; instructor James Johnson, Houghton Lake; instructor John Seelman, North Muskegon; instructor David Hansen, Cedar Springs; instructor Joseph Primozich, Pentwater; and DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler.

Pictured here are just four of the more than 40 hunting education instructors statewide honored for 40 years of volunteer service. Pictured (L to R) are DNR Director Keith Creagh; instructor James Johnson, Houghton Lake; instructor John Seelman, North Muskegon; instructor David Hansen, Cedar Springs; instructor Joseph Primozich, Pentwater; and DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler.

DNR honors longtime hunter education instructors for volunteer service

For nearly 70 years, Michigan has conducted hunter education classes, teaching new hunters firearms safety and the regulations behind having a safe and successful hunt. This year, the Department of Natural Resources has honored those longtime instructors who have been with the program more than 40 years with special recognition, including one from Cedar Springs. They have been honored at a series of Natural Resources Commission meetings.

“Our hunter education program has trained over 1 million hunters since its start in 1946 and currently trains about 20,000 students a year,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “We could not do this without the help of our hunter education instructors who volunteer because of their love of the outdoors and their deep interest in passing that interest along to the next generation of conservation leaders.”

There are at least 40 active hunter education instructors who have more than 40 years of service to the program, including Charles Duncan, of Bay City, who is the longest-serving instructor, having volunteered now for 49 years. Instructors honored at the Oct. 9 NRC meeting in Cadillac for their service include:

James A. Johnson, Houghton Lake (46 years).

John M. Seelman, North Muskegon (44 years).

David E. Hansen, Cedar Springs (44 years).

Joseph W. Primozich, Pentwater (43 years).

While having a crop of seasoned, veteran instructors is an advantage for Michigan’s hunter education program, there also is a need to recruit new instructors for the program in all regions of the state, said Lt. Andrew Turner, who manages the DNR’s Law Enforcement Division’s recreational safety program. “We greatly appreciate our veteran instructors who have been with the program for more than 40 years. If you have an interest in passing along your interest in hunting to new hunters, we need you in our program,” Turner said. “This is a great way to ensure that the sport you enjoy today is enjoyed by future generations of hunters.”

For more information on Michigan’s hunter education program, visit www.michigan.gov/huntereducation.

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Weekly Fishing Tip: 

 

OUT-fishing-tipHow to catch muskellunge when others can’t

For many anglers muskellunge can be quite elusive, but having a few tips in your back pocket can make your trips more successful.

The first thing to consider is the type of lure you might use. Many experts recommend using a jerkbait-style lure to trigger vertical follows.

The next item to consider is where you might look for muskellunge. Always be looking for cover, including weed patches or downed trees – these are prime spots for this species to linger.

Lastly, don’t be afraid to focus your fishing time to late afternoon/early evening. These dusty hours can produce some quality opportunities.

For even more information on fishing for muskellunge, check out their Michigan Fish and How to Catch Them page at www.michigan.gov/dnr. Click on fishing, then “fishing in Michigan,” then “Michigan fish and how to catch them.”

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DNR releases 2014 deer season forecast 

OUT-deer-season-forecastThe Michigan Department of Natural Resources today announced that its annual deer season forecast (2014 Deer Hunting Prospects) is now available online. DNR deer program biologists predict that hunters this season will see similar success rates as in 2013. The forecast is designed to give hunters a better idea of what to expect in the woods this season and includes:

Regional information breakdowns for the Upper Peninsula, the northern Lower Peninsula and the southern Lower Peninsula.

An overview of important changes for this license year, including information on multiple-year deer regulations, the new hunting and fishing license options, deer management unit boundaries for southern Michigan, and more.

Updates on wildlife health and diseases.

To acces the forecast, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr then click on hunting & trapping, then click on big game. Scroll down the page to the white-tailed deer section and click on 2014 deer season forecast.

For more tips and information on having a safe, successful deer season (including location of deer-check stations, antler point restriction FAQs and hunting digests), visit the DNR website www.michigan.gov/deer.

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Lunar Eclipse

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

It was one of those rare occasions when the Earth Sun and Moon aligned in a straight line. This does not occur every month so we do not experience eclipses often. If astronauts were on the moon, they would have witnessed a total solar eclipse while we watched the lunar eclipse. Earth cast its shadow on the moon when it was directly between Sun and Moon.

The Earth hides the moon rapidly unless one is too hurried to watch. Our patience is tried with the hurried business of our lives. I look forward to vacations when time is taken to contemplate the world and nature niches. It takes three days to slow down and shift my focus from work and home obligations.

One visitor joined me to see the eclipsing moon. He was having difficulty locating it and thanked me for being present. His arrival came when the upper right moon was just already starting to whiten. He thought it would was to be a blood moon. I commented that had already come and gone.

Watching the entire drama offers more than the great moments captured with a camera. The news showed pictures through amateur telescopes that were better than seen with the naked eye or binoculars but watching the progression exceeds the best still images.

Darkness began at the lower moon a gradually swept upward to the right until the Earth was centered between Sun and Moon. During the darkest phase the “blood red” hue was apparent. It amazes me how quickly the event comes and goes. Observers have a couple hours to enjoy an uncommon celestial event.

It has only been hundreds of years since Galileo was placed under house arrest for the rest of his life for explaining the science behind celestial objects and described that Earth is not the center of the universe. A great number of people do not accept scientific process or scientific findings because it does not align with what they “know” or want to believe. Scientists mathematically predict events like the lunar eclipse and it occurs rapidly enough for people to watch from beginning to end. Events like extinctions and global climate change are not easily observed and many people dismiss the evidence as too elusive to accept. In some ways we are no different from people of the 16th century.

One beauty of the eclipse is that we watch phases of the moon come and go in a couple hours instead of over one month. The events simulate the new moon, quarter moons, and full moon. Unlike the new moon, the arc of darkness is in the opposite direction at the beginning, but when the lighted portion begins to show, it appears like the new moon. The quarter moons are not divided with half dark and half light. Instead we see the arc of Earth’s shadow on the moon. Always watch for subtleness in nature.

The use of binoculars allows us to see ridges and craters along the edges of the moon. Toward the center we can see light and dark portions but the mountainous relief is only apparent near the edges.

Decades ago about 40 people joined me at Kent County’s highest elevation at Fisk Knob County Park to observe Haley’s comet. The Howard Christensen Nature Center (HCNC) is too wooded for good viewing of the horizon just before sunrise. I set up a telescope and many people from the Grand Rapids area arrived to witness the once in a lifetime event. Some expected a comet to be the size of the moon. Instead it was star-sized with a faint tail. I searched the dark sky unsuccessfully. Finally as the darkness of night began to fade, Haley’s comet came into view. I described the location for those using binoculars and hurriedly encouraged all to look through the telescope. They viewed the comet and saw its tail. The tail was not easily visible. People said they would not have seen it without help.

Check the HCNC web site for program details or better yet visit. Real experiences in nature exceed the ease of the internet’s vicarious exposure. Individuals and families getting into nature remind us we are a part of nature instead of merely being observers from a distance. When immersed in nature, at Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary or HCNC, nature comes alive.

To cap the enjoyment of another fine day, a yellow-rumped warbler was gathering breakfast among dimly lit tree leaves, as the dawn arrived at the eclipse conclusion.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at the odybrook@chartermi.net Ody Brook, 13010 Northland Dr, Cedar Springs, MI 49319-8433. 616-696-1753.

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Playoff bound!

Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer dives into the endzone with the game-winning touchdown. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer dives into the endzone with the game-winning touchdown. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

 

Red Hawk MavRick Cotten brings down the ball carrier. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Red Hawk MavRick Cotten brings down the ball carrier. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks varsity football team pulled off a double coup Friday night, October 10, when they not only clinched a playoff berth with their sixth win, but also took over sole possession of first place in the OK Bronze.

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks brought a fearless work ethic to their match up with the Huskies of Forest Hills Northern. This game was anticipated to be an offensive brawl, with both teams averaging 40-plus points a game for the season. But things turned out to be completely different when both teams’ defenses showed up to spoil the offensive festivities.

The game began with a scoreless first quarter and an indication of how the entire game would play out. Both teams exposed their true identities, with the Huskies showing their spread offense air attack, and the Red Hawks bringing their red flannel, relentless, full house wing T.

By the end of the first half, the Red Hawks’ team determination established an 8-point lead that the Huskies players had to sit on through the course of their extended homecoming halftime show that was filled with corvettes and BMWs.

Lane Gott on the tackle for the Red Hawks. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Lane Gott on the tackle for the Red Hawks. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

To start the second half, the Huskies tied the game up through the air at the end of the third quarter leaving the score at 8 to 8 going into the fourth. This had every fan in the stadium, including our infamous 12th man—the camo-clad, Cedar Springs student section—on the edge of their seats and screaming for a win.

In the end, it came down to a fourth and inches play, after the Husky defense stopped the Red Hawks on the goal line on second and third down. Red Hawk quarterback Collin Alvesteffer beat the Huskies’ defense to the end zone pylon to make the score 14 to 8, with just a few minutes to go in the game.

The Huskies then pulled out all the stops through the air and on the ground, in an attempt to keep their grip on the OK Bronze Conference title. Then came the final play for the Huskies, when the pass by Forest Hills Northern quarterback, Jake Martin, found the hands of Red Hawk defender, Collin Alvesteffer, which sealed the game for the Red Hawks!

Please join us for our 3rd Annual Pink game this Friday, October 17, when the Red Hawks face the Greenville Yellow Jackets at Red Hawk stadium at 7:00 p.m. Please come out and support your Red Hawks!

 

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Be the referee

 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

 

Automatic first downs 

 

Today we are going to talk about one of the biggest rule difference areas in high school football, from those rules used in college and pro games, and that deals with automatic first downs.

When watching that college game on Saturday or the pro game on Sunday, all of us know there are several defensive fouls that give the offense an automatic first down. However, under high school rules, the opposite is true most of the time.

The only high school fouls that result in an automatic first down for the offense are the roughing fouls—roughing the passer, the kicker, the holder and the long snapper. Fouls such as defensive pass interference or any other personal foul do not bring an automatic first down under high school rules.

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

 

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A Great Week for the Chargers

CTA’s Logan Colter passes an opponent.

CTA’s Logan Colter passes an opponent.

The Creative Technologies Academy Cross Country team came in with a focused mindset this week, knowing that the state meet was coming up soon, and their results certainly showed it. Even without their number one runner who missed the race due to an illness, the Chargers performed well at the conference championship meet at Riverside Park. Captain Ethan Lehman, a sophomore, finished in 8th place overall with a time of 18:53, a new lifetime personal record. He and Freshman Les Miner were given all conference awards for finishing in the top ten on the season in total points. Freshman James Hofstra continued his hot streak by breaking the 20 minute mark (19:57), with Logan Colter (21:17) and Dawson Armstrong (22:36) not far behind. It was quite an impressive day for the boys, finishing fourth out of six teams, even with Miner, their number one runner.

The girls also had an impressive day, led by 7th grader Zoe Lehman, who set a lifetime pr with a time of 24:31. Fellow 7th grader Hannah Hofstra finished second for the Chargers (26:28), with senior Olivia Wortz (28:49), 8th grader Brin Calkins (lifetime pr 28:54), and Junior Kaleigh Keech (lifetime pr 35:05) right on her heels. Just like the boys, the girls finished fourth out of six teams in their conference.

Just when Coach Verwey thought his team had their best meet of the season, he saw even more progress at the Montabella Invite Friday evening. The Charger boys finished in 5th place, ahead of teams such as White Cloud and Kent City, a true achievement. They placed three runners in the top 25 overall, led by Les Miner in fourth place (17:32), Ethan Lehman in 13th place with his second lifetime pr in three days (18:50), and James Hofstra in 25th place (19:59). Logan Colter (20:58), Dawson Armstrong (lifetime pr of 21:46), and Johnathon LaTourneau (lifetime pr of 25:35) rounded out the top 6 for the Chargers.

The varsity girls competed hard as well, with Olivia Wortz missing her lifetime personal record by only four seconds with a time of 28:02, and Junior Kaleigh Keech setting her second straight lilfetime personal record with a time of 34:27.

The Chargers have a full week to rest up before their next race, which will be this weekend for the Michigan Class D State Championships. The race is being held in Shepard, MI this upcoming Saturday at Maple Creek Golf Course. Go Chargers!

 

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