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Pine Rest offers substance use disorder family recovery group

Pine Rest offers a family recovery group led by certified advanced alcohol and drug counselor Stacey Williamson-Nichols for those with a loved one struggling with a substance use disorder.

The group sessions are held every Tuesday at the Pine Rest campus Retreat Center from 5:30-7 p.m. One topic per session is taught over a 10-week period. An orientation meeting must be attended prior to starting group and will be scheduled at the time of registration.

Besides developing an understanding of addiction, participants will learn ways to cope, set appropriate boundaries, build self-esteem and assertiveness skills. The recovery group places an emphasis on the family or support person of an individual struggling with substance use. The goal is to keep the people supporting their loved one healthy and knowledgeable.

The Family Recovery Group is open to the public for a fee of $15 per session, and free of charge to family members who have a loved one participating in Pine Rest’s Retreat Center/Addiction Medicine Services. Orientation is free for everyone. The Pine Rest Retreat Center address is 300 68th Street SE, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49548. To register, please call 616/258-7467. For more information, go to www.pinerest.org/events/.

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Walk to cure arthritis at John Ball Park Zoo

Funds raised is a step closer to finding a cure for the leading cause of disability

Over 800 walkers will be on hand at the 2016 Grand Rapids Walk to Cure Arthritis on Saturday, May 7, 2016, at the John Ball Park Zoo in Grand Rapids, MI, to help support the Arthritis Foundation and its mission to cure arthritis and make it easier for people living with the disease to achieve everyday victories. On-site registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the opening ceremony starts at 9:40 a.m. with the walk immediately following. As the Arthritis Foundation’s signature, national fundraising event, the Walk to Cure Arthritis brings together communities to fight arthritis, the nation’s leading cause of disability, and is a great way to experience the power of giving back to the community.

Supporters have the opportunity to walk a 1 or 3 mile route. Registration is free. With a $25 donation, participants can enjoy free admission to the zoo for the day. Walkers raising $100 or more will receive an official Walk t-shirt. The event also features arthritis information, refreshments and activities for the entire family.

Register online at www.WalkToCureArthritis.org/GrandRapids or contact Sue Arend at sarend@arthritis.org or 616-954-7649.

Local honorees will share their inspiring stories of living with arthritis during the Grand Rapids Walk to Cure Arthritis.

  • Youth Honoree Collin Scarpino, 17-years-old, Grand Rapids, MI – ankylosing spondylitis
  • Adult Honoree Holly Hubbard, 39-years-old, Jenison, MI – rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis
  • Medical Honoree Kory Johnson, DO, Orthopedic Specialist, Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

More than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S. live with arthritis. Costing the U.S. economy $156 billion dollars a year, arthritis affects one in five Americans and causes more activity limitation than heart disease, cancer or diabetes. The Grand Rapids Walk to Cure Arthritis will help those living with arthritis by supporting community programs, advocacy initiatives, as well as fund crucial research aimed at finding a cure for the disease.

Arthritis is more than just a few minor aches and pains. It’s a debilitating disease that robs people of their dreams,” says Michelle Glazier, executive director of the Arthritis Foundation, Michigan. “When you support Walk to Cure Arthritis, you become a Champion of Yes, helping us build a lifetime of better while accelerating the search for a cure. Whether you are close to the disease or simply looking for an inspiring charity event that truly makes a difference, Walk to Cure Arthritis is a great way to experience the power of standing together in the fight against arthritis. Together, we can Walk to Cure Arthritis and help us reach our goal of raising $90,700 to help find a cure for this disease.”

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The West Michigan Hawks start season Saturday at home

Logan Crandall

Logan Crandall

West Michigan Hawks: Meet Logan Crandall

Meet starting left tackle Logan Crandall. A 2006 graduate of Cedar Springs High School, Logan has always stood out on the football field. After playing high school ball and wrestling at Cedar Springs, Logan went on to coach for Cedar Springs, as well as play in the semi-pro ranks with the Lakeshore Cougars since 2008. He is currently the offensive line coach for Holland West Ottawa High School.

Off the field, Logan is currently an engineer. He enjoys working out, playing basketball, and hanging out with his dog, Bo. His biggest idols are his parents, as well as every football coach he played for in Cedar. “Oh yeah, also new Hawks QB Manny Hodges,” said Crandall. “That guy is going to set this league on fire and is too cool!”

The day after the Cougars season ended in the playoffs last year, Hawks owner/head coach David Lange reached out to me and said he was going to do everything he could to bring me home to the Hawks,” said Crandall, when asked why he chose to become a member of the West Michigan Hawks. “After that, I set out to recruit a handful of talented former teammates and bring them to the already formidable team in place. Coach Kapolka has done a fantastic job building the high school team into a powerhouse and I wanted to help bring another exciting football product to Cedar Springs. It’s an opportunity for former high school players to continue their football careers and help build excitement about football in the community! I couldn’t be happier about my decision to come home and play for the Hawks!”

Lange had nothing but great things to say about Logan, as well. “Logan was not only a guy that we wanted, but a guy that we needed. A Cedar Springs product, and a good one. Why wouldn’t we want him? He’s big, he’s fast, and he knows how to create holes for our running backs. Logan is a great athlete, a true leader, and someone the line can look to. He has great speed for his size and I think he will be a tremendous addition to the line.”

The Hawks begin their 2016 season this Saturday, when they host the Highland Park Polar Bears. The game will be held at Skinner Field, with tickets available at the gate. Tickets are $6 a piece, with children 10 and under receiving free admission. Doors open at 5 p.m. with kickoff scheduled for 6 p.m. We hope to see you there!

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New girls 7-8 softball teams have winning records

8th Grade softball team

8th Grade softball team

From Amanda Gerhardt

The Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recration Department is proud to be offering a 7th and 8th grade Softball team for the first time. The teams are coached by Neal Kooiman, 7th grade, and Dave Castor, 8th grade. They held try outs in February and are fielding teams of 11 players each. The girls worked hard with practices in March and then started their season on April 11 at Northview. The teams have played Northview, Lowell, Godwin, Wyoming Lee, and Sparta, and so far and both teams have a winning record!

The 7th grade team has had some exciting moments including a homerun from Katelin Kooiman. The teams is currenlty 8-3. The next home game for them is on Monday May 2, versus Sparta. The game will be played at Rockford Springs Community Church on M57, just east of Ritchie. They will play a double header at 4:30 p.m. They will close out their season at home on Monday May 9 vs. Wyoming.

With a current record of 6-3 the 8th grade is doing great as well. They have seen some exciting homeruns from Kaylie Andres, Kyla Andres, Zoe Castor and a grand slam from Kaelyn Colclasure. They have their next home game on Wednesday, May 4 vs Sparta. There will be double header at 4:30 p.m. at Rockford Springs Community Church.

We hope you will get out to watch these girls and show them the support of our great Red Hawk Community!

7th Grade softball

7th Grade softball

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Ranger Steve’s Nature Niche: Beyond belief

Ranger Steve

Ranger Steve

By Ranger Steve Mueller

The wonders of nature are often beyond belief. Constant amazement surrounds us with the antics of life. All sizes, shapes, colors, sounds, and smells take us to emotional highs that enrich our lives or lows that break our hearts.

Science is isolated from emotion and belief when used properly. Science accepts nothing about nature niches without the support of physical evidence from repeated experimentation.

A published study documented planaria could be taught to turn left to eat but to avoid turning right because they would get an electric shock. Planaria are small flat worms about one forth inch long and live under rocks in streams. I look under rocks in the creek at Ody Brook annually to enjoy the emotional uplift of seeing the worms and knowing stream conditions are still suitable for them.

In the study, “educated” planaria were ground up and fed to other planaria. The study reported flat worms that ate the “educated” planaria turned left to eat and avoided turning right. The scientist concluded planaria learned their behavior by eating “educated” planaria. Other scientists repeated the study to verify the findings but the results could never be duplicated. Science discarded the conclusions of the original scientific study. Science is self-correcting through repeatable, verifiable tests using controlled experimentation.

Many things in nature seem unbelievable but repeated tests often support conclusions. One thing people informally test annually in our yards is with robins, cardinals, and some other birds. The male birds fight their reflection in windows until they break their beaks or even die. Bird brains are not smart enough to know the reflection is not another bird and they try drive the other male from their territory.

TV shows try to portray the “ideal” scientific thinking devoid of emotional influence and devoid of making conclusions without adequate physical evidence. Shows like “Bones” and “Rizzoli and Isles” have scientists that do not make conclusions without adequate physical evidence. In the real world, scientific process requires peer reviewed analysis to help prevent erroneous conclusions from getting published. The rigors of science help keep beliefs from influencing scientific conclusions.

Belief is beyond scientific acceptability. Evidence supports climate change is greatly human influenced. Many people however accept or reject it depending on the conclusion they want. Science requires tentative conclusions based on physical evidence. Science conclusions are always tentative pending further study like in the planaria behavior study. People usually believe based on their perception without rigorous scientific experimental support. That is typical with politics and religion. No amount of physical evidence will usually convince people otherwise concerning politics or religion.

The question can be asked, should religion and politics be dismissed because they are not supported with adequate rigorous scientific conclusions? My answer is No. There is a place for multiple realities that impact our lives. Emotions and feelings are a real part of our lives and drive our moral behavior. Science does not include morals. It is about “How” the world works solely based on physical evidence. It is not about “Why” the world exists. Society is guided by melding logical reasoning of “How” with emotional feelings and morals taught during upbringing of “Why.” Religion is a “Why” reality. Faith depends on acceptance without physical evidence. Faith is believing without supportable physical evidence. Science and faith can complement each other for a sustainable future.

When something seems beyond belief, determine if it is scientifically supportable or is accepted on faith. Determine if decisions benefiting future generations should be made based on science, faith, or both. I suggest science and faith together will support a better future and should not be an either/or decision.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Fishing Tip: Northern pike tips & tricks to try

A good spring catch.

A good spring catch.

This Saturday, April 30, marks the opening of the inland walleye, pike and muskellunge seasons in the Lower Peninsula. Are you ready to try your hand at northern pike fishing?

Northern pike like to spend their time in the weedy shallows of both the Great Lakes and inland waters. In rivers they can be found around log jams or fallen timber. They are often taken with live bait (such as large minnows) or different kinds of artificial lures.

When fishing for northern pike, many anglers like to use a six to eight-inch wire or steel leader directly in front of hook or lure. Pike have large, deep mouths with extremely sharp teeth. They are known to engulf the entire bait or lure and sever the fishing line with their teeth when it is attached directly to the hook or lure. This leaves the angler watching as the fish swims away with their offering.

Some well-known northern pike waters include Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River and drowned river mouths along the Lake Michigan shoreline.
Want to learn even more about northern pike in Michigan at www.michigan.gov/dnr.

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DNR to give folks a hand in their hunt for morels

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources provides an online interactive map that highlights the state’s 2015 wildfires and prescribed burns—each more than 10 acres in size—to help mushroom hunters in their quest for morels.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources provides an online interactive map that highlights the state’s 2015 wildfires and prescribed burns—each more than 10 acres in size—to help mushroom hunters in their quest for morels.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources provides an online interactive map that highlights the state’s 2015 wildfires and prescribed burns—each more than 10 acres in size—to help mushroom hunters in their quest for morels.

Morel mushrooms are often found in locations where large fires occurred the previous year,” said Jim Fisher, resource protection manager for the DNR Forest Resources Division. “Each spring we get calls from people who are seeking details on those sites to hunt morels. We’ve enhanced the features of this map to give our customers the information they are looking for in a mobile-friendly, easily accessible package.”

The DNR’s interactive Mi-Morels map provides forest cover type information, latitude and longitude coordinates and state-managed land boundary information. You can find it at www.michigan.gov/mi-morels.

Morel mushrooms commonly sprout in locations burned by wildfires or prescribed burns with a tree canopy; grass or sunlit open areas are less likely to produce the tasty fungi.

While the map may provide details on the cover type that was burned, it’s up to the user to investigate whether morel mushrooms are growing at any location on the map,” Fisher said. “Just because a spot is marked on the map, it doesn’t mean morels will be growing at the area identified. We’re providing a resource, but it’s up to the hunters to head out to the forest and see what’s available.”

The information and data in the map on burn locations, state forest cover type, and state-managed land boundaries are available for users to interact with and download via the DNR Open Data portal. This site gives residents and public land users of Michigan access to Michigan DNR spatial data and information.

The Department of Natural Resources is not responsible for the incorrect identification of morel mushrooms. For more information on safe mushroom hunting, visit the DNR’s website.

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Auto Advice: Don’t fear the check engine light

A “check engine” light coming on doesn’t mean you have to stop driving immediately but you should get it looked at very soon.

A “check engine” light coming on doesn’t mean you have to stop driving immediately but you should get it looked at very soon.

(NAPS) — Although the check engine light may look scary lit up on the dashboard, you don’t need to panic. A glowing check engine light doesn’t mean you have to immediately pull the car to the side of the road; it does mean you should get the car checked out as soon as possible.

Motorists should not get spooked when the check engine light comes on,” says Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council, the source for the “Be Car Care Aware” campaign promoting regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair. “When illuminated, the check engine light usually means that a vehicle system, such as the ignition, fuel injection or emission control, is not operating properly.”

Possible Problems

Some common malfunctions that can cause the light to illuminate include a faulty oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or spark plugs and wires. If the light flashes, the condition is more critical and must be checked immediately to prevent severe damage, which may include catalytic converter problems.

Even if the vehicle appears to be running normally, ignoring the warning light could result in more costly repairs,” adds White. “At the very least, the light could be alerting you to an engine problem that is negatively impacting fuel economy and costing you money.”

Service and Solutions

When scheduling service, make sure the repair shop that examines your vehicle has professional technicians who are trained and certified in OBDII diagnosis and repair. The technician will connect your vehicle’s computer system to a diagnostic scan tool, which will provide trouble codes indicating why the check engine light was activated. While the diagnostic tool is connected, the technician can analyze data streams such as the idle speed, throttle response, engine temperature, fuel system pressure, manifold vacuum, exhaust emission levels and many other key indicators. Once the problem is identified and the repair is made, the car’s computer is reset.

LearnMore

For further illuminating facts about taking the scare out of an illuminated check engine light, visit www.carcare.org, view the council’s Car Care Minute and order a free copy of the newly updated Car Care Guide at www.carcare.org/car-care-guide.

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Auto Advice: Keep track of open recalls

Remember, to keep your car  safe, it pays to pay attention to auto recalls.

Remember, to keep your car safe, it pays to pay attention to auto recalls.

(NAPS)—If you’re like most people, car safety and performance are important to you. But you might be surprised to hear that over 47 million vehicles have unfixed safety recalls—vehicles you might be sharing the road with or driving yourself.

Alarmingly, family-oriented vehicles like SUVs and minivans are the least-often fixed. An auto recall usually occurs when the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration finds that a car has a defect or fails to meet federal safety standards.

While repeated attempts are made to reach the owners, the stats suggest that people aren’t well-enough informed about recalls, and may not know where to start. To help you stay informed, you can use the free myCarfax.com service to get e-mails or text alerts about current and future recalls on your car.

Fixing recalls helps maintain the safety and value of your car, makes roads safer, and is normally free. Plus, most recall fixes are completed in less than a day.

Remember that only a manufacturer’s dealer is authorized to fix recalls. If your car is recalled, call your local dealer immediately.

Learn more and sign up at www.mycarfax.com

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And the cat came back

 

A man hated his wife’s cat and decided to get rid of it. So he put the cat in the car, and drove 20 blocks from home, and dropped it off in a strange neighborhood. By the time the man got home, the cat was already walking up the driveway.

The next day, the man decided to drop the cat 40 blocks away but the same thing happened.

He kept on increasing the number of blocks away from his house, but the cat kept getting home before him. At last he decided to take a meandering path into the country—drive a few miles away, turn right, then left, past the bridge, then right again, then another right, then left, and so on, until he reached what he thought was a perfect spot, and dropped the cat there.

Hours later, the man called his wife at home and asked her if the cat was there.

“Yes, why do you ask?” answered the wife.

“Put that cat on the phone,” grumbled the man. “I’m lost and I need directions.”

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