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Man loses arm in farming accident

 

A West Olive man called Kent County 911 dispatch about 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 7, to report his arm had been amputated.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, the 56-year-old man was involved in a farming accident at 8095 Peach Ridge, in Alpine Township, which is south of 10 Mile Rd.

Police said the operates a hog farm on the property, and it appears that he was working near the PTO shaft of a manure spreader when his clothing became entangled and his arm was wrapped up in the shaft. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment. The man’s name has not yet been released.

The Kent County Sheriff Department was assisted at the scene by an MSP Trooper, Alpine Fire, and Rockford Ambulance.

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Michigan National Guard Soldiers depart in support of Irma response

More than 400 Soldiers departed Michigan hometowns and National Guard armories across the state, on Monday, Sep. 11, in preparation to go to Florida to support the Florida National Guard with relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

One CH-47 Chinook helicopter, with eight air and ground crew personnel, departed from Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Mt. Clemens, Mich. The crew is likely to provide aerial support for personnel and logistical movement. They will stage in North Carolina, then move to Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Fla., once the weather allows.

Approximately 425 Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment left four Michigan National Guard armories for Camp Grayling, Mich., the first leg of their trip, where they consolidated and packed equipment, includes more than 120 vehicles and trucks.

The armories included:

*Grand Valley Armory:  HHC, Co B, and Co I, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment

1200 44th St SW, Wyoming, MI

*Company A, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, 4400 East 8 Mile Road, Detroit, MI

*Company C, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment 700 W Prairie Ronde St, Dowagiac, MI

*Company D, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, 415 Haynes St, Cadillac, MI

The 3-126 Infantry is expected to deploy to the west side of southern Florida where they are likely to provide humanitarian assistance and security. The battalion departed Grayling and headed for Florida on Wednesday, Sept. 13.

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What are you being called to do?

Pastor Inge Whittemore

East Nelson United Methodist Church

9024 18 Mile Rd, Cedar Springs

 

Hello and happy fall! Well, truth be told, I am sad that summer is drawing to an end because I love the long days and warm evenings. Yet September brings us to many new activities and our ambitions are quickened and we get back into our routines and there is actually some joy in that. I believe many parents of young children especially appreciate it.

The fall brings about a renewed focus on the activities of the church since everyone is returning from summer vacations and the routine sets in. Kid ministries start up, including the KidzClub here at East Nelson Church on Thursday evenings. Mission trip planning gets into full gear. High school youth begin meeting. It’s a lot of fun to watch the joy that comes from community activities.

September is a great time for each of us to recommit once again to what the Spirit might be calling us to do. Might a Bible study group be calling to you? How about a recommitment to daily devotions? Maybe there’s a new sense of calling to attend regular worship? Are you feeling called to begin some new ministry?

We read that Jesus told his disciples that discipleship requires commitment and then we take that and begin to worry that a commitment might be a cross that we could not possibly bear. But, if we try to do this on our own and try to figure out ways to do this all by ourselves, we can get all tangled up! Jesus told his disciples “for mortals it is impossible, but not for God; for God, all things are possible.” Let’s open ourselves to the working of the Holy Spirit and answer the call on our lives.

The terrific news is that the Holy Spirit is at work all the time. The work of the Holy Spirit is in leading and guiding us, counseling and inspiring us. When we feel called yet worry that we can’t do it or we simply don’t have the time, just listen to the words of Jesus and understand that we are not in this all by ourselves. The Holy Spirit will give us the strength to work together and we will be given the ability to support each other. We will be able to do the work of our church communities.

So, should you think you can’t, open yourself to the workings of the Holy Spirit and you will be filled by the amazing action of God in your life.

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MAXINE ELLEN KNOX

Maxine Ellen Knox age 89 of Belmont, our beloved mother, grandmother and great grandmother passed away Saturday, September 9, 2017 at Sanctuary of St. Mary’s. She was born January 28, 1928 in Ensley Twp. to Hans and Hilda (Larson) Hanson. She attended Howard City High School and graduated in 1947. She enjoyed singing, dancing, cooking for all occasions, watching sunsets, and tending flowers in her garden. She worked at the GM Alpine plant for 32 ½ years. After retiring she moved to Belmont, MI where she enjoyed her family and wonderful friends including her best friend and companion, Ralph Bosgraff. She loved bringing joy to others and her kindness and love was felt by whomever she met.  She is survived by her son, Stephen and Denise Knox; daughter-in-law, Kay Knox; grandchildren, Kyle (Katie) Knox, Kristine (Ehren) Dollberg, Craig Knox and Christa Knox and many great grandchildren; sister, Shirley (Jack) Hanes; brother-in-law, Loren Frey; several nieces, nephews, cousins and precious friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gerald; her baby girl; son, Stan Knox; grandson, Cory Knox; sisters, Pauline (Norman) Kranz, Violet Frey, Lorraine (Fay) Gordon. The service was held on Wednesday, September 13 at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. Pastor Paul Frey, officiating. Interment North Ensley Cemetery. The family would like to thank the Sanctuary of Saint Mary’s for the compassionate care Maxine received in her final days. Memorial contributions may be made to South Ensley Methodist Church or charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs.

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ROBERT HAVENS

 

passed away August 29, 2017 surrounded by his children. Bob was an active outdoorsman who loved hiking, fishing, camping, panning for gold, hunting, sunsets, the Great Lakes, and story telling. He will be remembered for his engaging debates, his ability to fix anything and his love of history. Bob spent winters in Golden Valley, Arizona followed by summers in Michigan with family. He is survived by his children Michelle (Rick) Wernet, Michael Havens, Mitchell (Carolyn) Havens; special friend Valerie Adams; grandchildren Marc, Kurt (Caitlin), Trevor and Ali Wernet, Cody Havens; great-grandchildren William and Kensley; and brother-in-law Dave DeBruyn. Bob was preceded in death by his wife Charlotte, friend Gloria Mulholland and sister Nancy (Dave) DeBruyn. A celebration of life was held Friday, September 15, 2017 at Caledonia Lakeside Park pavilion, 370 N. Lake St. SE, Caledonia, MI 49316. The family received visitors from 6-7pm followed by a memorial at 7pm. The family wishes to express their gratitude for the nurses and doctors involved in his care this summer, especially his nurse Anna. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation in Bob’s name to the American Cancer Society.

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Thank you

Thank the Lord for sending his angels of protection to watch over me when I was in a car accident on White Creek Avenue last Wednesday night, September, 6th.  It was a very scary thing to have someone’s headlights coming at me in my lane and swerving off the road to avoid hitting the oncoming car head on. I know I ended up in the ditch and totaled my car but it could have been a lot worse if I had hit the car head on. Too bad the driver of the other car never stopped, I don’t even know if they even were aware of what happened.

Thank you to the kind couple that stopped to help me after my accident. You were very kind and helpful and I appreciate it very much. Thank you to Rockford Ambulance for getting me to Spectrum Butterworth where I got checked over and nothing was broken, just bruised pretty good. I’m doing much better now.  Thank you to my husband, Michael Sanderson for coming to my aid so quickly and being by my side at the hospital. Thank you to all the doctors and nurses that helped take care of me.

With many thanks, 

Belinda Sanderson

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Living Resources patches available for purchase 

 

The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase through the end of September.

Through end of September

The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase on the Michigan e-store at https://media.state.mi.us/MichiganeStore/public/Home.aspx through the end of September. (Go to the home page, then click on Patches, Mugs, and t-shirts.)

The Living Resources patch program has raised awareness of Michigan’s nongame species for over 40 years, with the first Living Resources patch issued in 1975 featuring the Kirtland’s warbler.

Proceeds from the sale of these patches goes into the Nongame Fish and Wildlife Fund, which provides a source of funding for projects vital to the needs of Michigan’s endangered, threatened and nongame animals, plants and their habitats.

Funds for these important management efforts also have been raised through voluntary check-off contributions on the state income tax form, sales of the wildlife habitat specialty license plate and direct donations.

Today, those interested in contributing can support the fund through purchase of a wildlife habitat license plate, making a tax-deductible donation or purchasing a patch.

Those who would like to request a mail-in order form can contact the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division at 517-284-WILD (9453).

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Protecting Parks

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

The results are in for the public comment period required by law regarding how Americans feel about eliminating or greatly reducing the size the of national monuments by Presidential Executive Order. When a president creates a national monument, it protects the area the same as a national park until Congress decides to make it a national park, eliminate or change it in some manner. The Antiquates Act of 1906 allows a President to create a monument to provide protection until Congress acts on the protected area. It takes years or decades to be debated and acted on by Congress.

President Trump instructed the Secretary of Interior to review national monuments created since 1996 because he plans to eliminate or greatly reduce the size of monuments by Executive Order. Park advocate groups like the National Parks Association, Wilderness Society, and many others claim it is beyond the legal ability of a President to alter the monuments created by previous presidents. Such changes are legally restricted to Congress. Before becoming President, Trump campaigned for changing parks from protected areas to being open to mining for natural resource consumption, turned over to private business management or even eliminated. The monument review is a test to see if he can eliminate them and possibly continue with elimination of the national parks by Executive Order.

The National Park Service was created in the Organic Act of 1916. The agency’s mission as managers of national parks and monuments was clearly stated.

“….to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”

The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance released the following statement to the media: “Secretary Zinke’s illegal recommendations to the President are the latest salvo in this administration’s attacks on America’s public lands. It’s outrageous that after 99 percent of the more than 2.8 million comments received by the Secretary supported keeping our monuments protected, Secretary Zinke is still recommending the President illegally attack our national treasures. President Trump should throw this report away.”

Other organizations have released similar statements to the media to let American citizens know that national parks are being attacked. An analysis of the public comments shows 0.8 percent of people commenting support the Presidents Executive Order and 99.2 oppose the EO. Those commenting from Michigan were 100 percent opposed to the Executive Order.

The report can be found at PublicSupportForPublicLands_FINAL_20170822.pdf. The following in italics are from the report conclusions. The public overwhelmingly opposes rescinding or reducing the protection afforded 27 national monuments and 5 marine national monuments established since 1996. This opposition cuts across geography, issue areas (environment, Native American rights and culture, recreation, economy, etc.), and it is not specific to any national monument.

Taken together this study shows that the people can and have been heard, and that they have spoken clearly and forcefully for the continued protection of America’s public lands and the natural, scenic, sacred, culturally and historically significant places they contain.

Despite public sentiment of 99.2 percent opposed, the interior secretary has recommended greatly reducing the size the monuments. That will allow mining development in areas that are currently protected for present and future generations. The parks protect nature niches and are our insurance policy that allows us to visit special treasures and preserves them for coming generations. Park protection is an important means for preserving biodiversity.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Catch of the Week

Skyler Kleyn, age 5, loves to fish! The Cedar Springs kindergartner was fishing on Wolf Lake in Baldwin in August, when she caught this beautiful blue gill. Skyler is the daughter of Melissa and Evan Kleyn of Algoma Township.

Way to go Skyler, you made the Post Catch of the Week!

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Red Hawks stand tough against Greenville

The Red Hawks held the Yellow Jackets to only 7 points last Friday night at Red Hawk Stadium.

The Red Hawks run back out onto the field after half time, ready to take on the Yellow Jackets in the third and fourth quarters.

By Kayleigh Boomgaard

Under the Friday night lights of September 8, the Red Hawk varsity football team took on the Greenville Yellow Jackets in their third game of the season and brought in a win on their own turf 48-7.

After both the Cedar Springs freshman and junior varsity football teams defeated the Jackets on Thursday evening, the varsity boys were determined to continue the winning streak.

Senior fullback John Jacob Todd scored the first touchdown of the night with 8:30 to play in the first quarter. Todd ran up the middle for 20 yards and completed his run into the end zone, starting the game off on a good foot.

Junior halfback Ryan Ringler finished off the play with a two-point conversion, bringing the score to Cedar Springs 8, Greenville 0.

Todd scored three additional touchdowns during the game, and a two-point conversion in the second quarter, after securing a pass thrown by senior quarterback Nicholas Campione.

Senior halfback Darius Barnett, whose second touchdown consisted of a short pass by Campione and a 53-yard run, put up additional points for the Red Hawks.

Campione assisted one touchdown and two two-point conversions, and made key passes on multiple occasions to contribute to the team’s win.

In the third quarter, shortly after returning from halftime, Greenville junior Ryan Burden ran a reverse left and scored his team’s only touchdown of the night. The touchdown was followed by a PAT (point after touchdown) kicked by Greenville player Bryce Priebe.

The first conference game of the season for the Red Hawks concluded with a winning score of Cedar Springs 48, Greenville 7.

To see the results of the upcoming game, support the Cedar Springs varsity football team at the Northview Wildcat’s stadium on Friday, September 15. Game time is 7 p.m.

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