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ERWIN D. FOX

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Erwin D. Fox, 87 of Sand Lake, died Monday, August 25, 2014 at his home. Erwin was born July 19, 1927 in Comstock Park, Michigan the son of Leon and Thelma (Geer) Fox. He served his country in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a mechanic and worked many years for C.H. Wallace Pontiac. Erwin enjoyed hunting, fishing, dancing, snowmobiling and chopping wood. He was a member of the North Kent Snowmobile Club. Surviving are his wife, Marjory; children, Dennis (Laura) Smith, Linda (Don) Vandenberg, Carolyn (Greg) Wagner, Kurt Fox, Susan Fox; 13 grandchildren; 28 great grandchildren; one great great grandson; sister, Yvonne Brownell; brother-in-law, Donald Seaborn. He was preceded in death by two sisters and one brother. The family will greet friends Thursday, August 28 from 12 noon until time of service at 1:00 pm at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. Pastor Tuttle officiating. Interment with military honors at Solon Township Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the family to help with final expenses.
Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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JANET L. RIGGLE

C-obit-RiggleJanet L. Riggle, 90 of Cedar Springs, passed away peacefully from this life and entered into the presence of her Saviour on Saturday, August 23, 2014 at Metron of Cedar Springs. Janet was married to Howard “Slim” Riggle on April 6, 1942 and together they raised a family. Early in their marriage, they owned and operated a Sunoco gas station and restaurant in Edmore, Michigan. In 1953, they moved to Cedar Springs after they bought the business known as Hough’s Dairy. She went to work with Slim, delivering milk, eggs and bread to area businesses and homes. In 1959, they purchased Hough’s Dairy Bar, changing the name to Janet’s Dairy Bar. She operated that business until it was sold in 1969. She became the Treasurer for the City of Cedar Springs in 1973 and worked there ten years, retiring in 1983. She dearly loved being a mom was awarded the title, “Most Fun Grandmother” by her grandkids. Janet was always up for an adventure and loved to travel, visiting England, Scotland, Florida, Texas and Colorado during her lifetime. She was an avid gardener and also enjoyed oil painting and ceramics. She was an accomplished seamstress, sewing clothes for her husband and kids. In her later years, she started knitting sweaters, hats and mittens, and she started making quilts, many of which are still being used and enjoyed by all her family members. She could dance a mean polka and her bark was often worse than her bite. Janet is survived by her children; Lee Ann Eary of Boyne City, Debbi (Lohryn) Gates of Howard City, Terri L. Riggle of Cedar Springs, Howard David (Cyndi) Riggle of Cedar Springs; 13 grandchildren; 17 great grandchildren; 3 great great grandchildren; brothers, Eugene Crosby; Roger (Barb) Crosby; and Charles (Mary) Crosby; many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Howard “Slim” Riggle, son, Craig S. Riggle; great granddaughter, Piper L. Gates; son-in-law, Robert F. Eary. The family greeted friends Monday, August 25 from 6-8 pm at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The service was held Tuesday 11:00 am at the United Methodist Church, 140 S. Main St., Cedar Springs. Pastor Steve Lindeman officiating. Interment Elmwood Cemetery, Cedar Springs. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Michigan, 989 Spaulding SE, Ada, MI 49306
Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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WILLIAM PAUL GUNUNG

William Paul Genung age 82 of Sand Lake passed away at home on Wednesday August 20, 2014. He was born in Dowagiac Michigan on December 25, 1931 the son of Merle T. and Nora (Franklin) Genung. Bill was retired from Packaging Corporation of America in Wyoming with 34 years of service. He was a veteran of the US Army serving in Korea and receiving a purple heart for disabling wounds, but never was limited in giving for his country and his work and family. He was a member of the VFW Post 3306 in Howard City and the American Legion of Comstock Park. He loved camping and feeding his birds. He enjoyed delivering the Cedar Springs Post for many years. He was preceded in death by his brothers Fred, Larry and Glen Genung, his son Tom Boden and his daughter Deb Russo. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Rosalyn Genung , his children; Daphne “Candy” Boden, Roger( Pam) Boden, Mike (shelly) Barrett, Bill (Peg) Barrett, Tom Barrett, Lori (Dave) DeYoung, Karen (Kevin) Clark; 27 grandchildren, 45 great grandchildren and 9 great great grandchildren, and nieces and nephews. Memorial services were held on Monday August 25, 2014 at 1 PM from the VFW Post # 3306 in Howard City (1001 S. Ensley). Memorial contributions may be given to the American Heart Association. Messages of condolence may be sent via hurstfuneralhome.com. Arrangements by Hurst Funeral Home, Greenville.

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“Could that Happen Here?”

Solon-Center-WesPastor Tom Holloway
Solon Center Wesleyan Church
15671 Algoma, Cedar Springs
(just north of 19 Mile)

As I look at the events that are taking place in Ferguson, Missouri, it makes me ask the question, “Could that happen in Cedar Springs?” Have you thought about that? Or do you just assume that something like that could never happen here? I think it would be foolish of us to think that something like that couldn’t happen here; but at the same time, I believe that the things our community is doing is building in safeguards so that those kinds of things won’t happen here.
What are the safeguards in our community? The first is that we are truly a community. We are a group of people that values a greater sense of purpose. The idea is that there is something larger than our own personal interests. The fact that 8 or 9 churches can come together on a Sunday morning and forego their own offerings and take one large offering and give it to the Cedar Springs Ministerial Association to help the hurt, and needy in our community is proof.  Think about that for a second–that’s like taking your family’s paychecks for the week and giving it away to someone or something other than your own needs.  Yet, the cell phone bill still comes, the groceries need to be bought, the lights need to stay on, the mortgage payment still needs to be paid, and for the churches the staff still needs to be paid.
That is enough to make church people and leaders squirm and to not get involved in something bigger. But after six years of doing “United,” the churches continue to close their doors to meet in the community. If you’ve never been a part of a church then you might not see that as a big deal, but it shows that there is a common unity and a trust in this community that isn’t prevalent in a lot of other communities.
The second safeguard that we have in our community is a sense of leaving Cedar Springs better than we found it. I don’t know about you, but I want to leave our community better off than it is now. I want to know that when I’m dead and gone that I helped make our little corner of the world better than I found it. Do you know that we have a Community Building Development Team? What is their goal? To make the community better by working together with the current resources, and to remember the past by honoring it, and also building community buildings that will be the highlight of the community.
Why are they doing that? Is it to put their name on a building, or to get a pat on the back? Not at all. They are doing it because they know that an investment in the community that builds community will enhance living in Cedar Springs, which will lead to more families choosing Cedar Springs over other communities.  Which also means more of a tax base, more resources to spend at the local stores, more students to help build more and better schools, and more and better athletes that will enhance our already great sports teams.
When many people are in a time in their life where they can just sit back and relax, those people are seeking to develop the place where we live. When we see that others truly care about a larger purpose, it builds trust when others would seek to divide us.
The final safeguard that I believe is in place is simply the Lord. In a time in the world when it’s not popular to claim the name of Jesus, I believe that our community is proud to claim His hand on us. I have seen so many times that God has had His hand on our community it blows my mind.
Jesus was asked what the most important law was and He told them that it was twofold. The first was to love God, and the second was equally important. Love your neighbor as much as you love yourself. In other words, we need each other in order to be right with God. It’s more than just living your own life, and doing all of the right things. It’s much bigger than that. There is a larger purpose in mind.
The original question was, “Could what happened in Ferguson happen to us?”  I believe if we in Cedar Springs continue to love and serve our God, who has been so generous to us, and to put others ahead of ourselves, it can’t happen here.

But it’s up to us individually, and also collectively. So the next time you are tempted to think bad about someone or their actions, trust that they have your best interest at heart. It’s up to you!

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Keep it simple

By Ronnie McBrayer

By Ronnie McBrayer

The Old Testament Law contains 613 individual commandments. Such a corpus of legal code is incredibly lengthy. Yet, the oral tradition that supplements the Law is also extensive. Translated into English, it is a multi-volume set of more than seven thousand pages.
So it’s no surprise that Jesus was once asked this pertinent question: “Which is the most important commandment in the Law?” Jesus answered: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, and mind. He then added, “The second most important is similar: Love your neighbor as much as you love yourself.” If only practical faith could stay on this level of holy simplicity.
Christians are a verbose group. We always have something to say, prove, defend, attack, clarify, protect, or explain. As if elaborate statements of faith will improve upon our Founder’s humble words. Complication and baggage just seem to naturally collect like barnacles attaching themselves to a ship.
It requires vigilance—the closest, most careful attention—to keep faith concentrated along the lines of which Jesus spoke. To do otherwise, to let faith go where it will, seems to lead to more words, more demands and commands, and more impediments to actually practicing the way of Christ.
I like the personal story told by Jim Wallis when he was a teenager. Young Jim picked up a girlfriend to take to a movie, an act strictly forbidden in the church culture of his youth. As Jim and his date prepared to leave the house, the girl’s father stood in the doorway blocking their exit. He said to the couple, tears in his eyes, “If you go to this film, you’ll be trampling on everything that we’ve taught you to believe.”
While the shaming was over the top, the man’s conviction is honorable, in a curious sort of way. He was begging those he loved to stay true to the path. I have similar convictions when it comes to simplicity. Thus, I have lost count of the times over the years when people wanted more—more words, more dogma, more doctrine, and more rules. At such times, I firmly grip the doorframe and say, “No, let’s keep it simple.”
If we can learn to love God and love our neighbors (no easy task), it will be enough. It will be more than enough. For “shattering and disarming simplicity,” said the great C.S. Lewis, “is the real answer.”
Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, pastor, and author. His newest book is “The Gospel According to Waffle House.” You can read more at www.ronniemcbrayer.me.

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Fly & Remember

Each September, Hospice of Michigan encourages families across the state to decorate and fly kites during community events to celebrate the lives of those who have died.

Each September, Hospice of Michigan encourages families across the state to decorate and fly kites during community events to celebrate the lives of those who have died.

Celebrating the lives of those we’ve lost

Even though Judy Fleming’s father died three years ago, she takes comfort knowing he lived a good life and died a peaceful death in his home with family around him. While she has made peace with his death, she often finds herself missing him and looks for an opportunity to remember and feel connected.
“Even after we learn to cope with the grief of losing a loved one, there is no promise we will stop missing them,” said Karen Monts, director of grief support services at Hospice of Michigan. “And for some of us, we don’t want to. In fact, people often say the fading memory of those we love can be the hardest things to cope with.”
To offer the bereaved an opportunity to remember and celebrate the legacy of their lost loved ones, HOM will hold nine community-wide Fly & Remember memorial events throughout Michigan in September. Attendees at these free annual events have the opportunity to personalize a kite in memory of their loved one and then to fly it in that person’s honor. Anyone who has experienced a loss is welcome to attend, not just those who died under Hospice of Michigan care.
“Fly & Remember is an uplifting event that provides people with time to remember their loved ones and reflect on their life in a positive and productive way,” Monts explains. “Memorializing loved ones who have passed allows the bereaved to keep the essence of their loved one alive. It is important to remember that coping with grief isn’t about forgetting your loved one, it’s about getting to a place where you can find peace with the loss and happiness in the memories you once shared.”
In an effort to keep the memory of her father alive, Fleming has attended Fly & Remember each year since his death. She also brings her mother, who is looking for ways to hold on to memories of her husband of 65 years.
“Instead of typical kite decorations, my mom and I write a letter to my dad on the kite,” Fleming said. “When we fly it, we feel like we’re sending him a message.”
“The Fly & Remember event has become a wonderful day to remember and celebrate my father,” Fleming adds. “When I fly the kite I feel connected to him and a sense of peace falls over me. I’m reminded that he’s gone to a better place.”
Fleming says that in addition to memorializing her father, there is an overwhelming feeling of support by those who attend. “The event is very welcoming. I see many of the same people attend each year, and I’ve become friends with some of them,” Fleming recalled. “There are people there that I can talk to and even cry with; and they understand where I’m coming from.”
Each community hosting a Fly & Remember event plans to partner with other organizations and offer unique activities, such as live music and reading of poems. Events will be held:
•    Saturday, Sept. 6, in Manistee
•    Monday, Sept. 8th in Boyne City
•    Friday, Sept. 12, in Lake City
•    Saturday, Sept. 13, in Gaylord
•    Saturday, Sept. 13, in Royal Oak
•    Tuesday, Sept. 16, in Ann Arbor
•    Tuesday, Sept. 16, in Grand Rapids
•    Thursday, Sept. 18, in Traverse City
•    Saturday, Sept. 27, in Alpena
“These events offer something for all members of a family,” Monts explained. “In addition to the spiritual healing it offers adults, it offers kids a healthy way to remember those they’ve lost and creates an opportunity for them to open up and talk about it.”
Fly & Remember registration information and location specifics can be found on http://hom.convio.net/site/PageServer?pagename=FLY_and_Remember.
For those who can’t attend, HOM is also offering families the opportunity to make a donation and fly a virtual kite in memory of a loved one. The virtual experience also gives friends and family an opportunity to post messages of support and share memories of the deceased.
Fly & Remember, which was first held in 2009, is just one of many ways that HOM works with patients and patient families to offer support, strength and guidance through the emotional challenges of loss. For more information on HOM grief support and memorial events, visit www.hom.org.

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EarthTalk®

According to a report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), nearly half of American kids aged eight and under consume potentially harmful amounts of vitamin A, zinc and niacin because of excessive food fortification. Photo by Andy Melton, courtesy Flickr

According to a report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), nearly half of American kids aged eight and under consume potentially harmful amounts of vitamin A, zinc and niacin because of excessive food fortification. Photo by Andy Melton, courtesy Flickr


E – The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Is it true that much of our food—including cereals and snacks eaten by children—is actually over-fortified with excessive amounts of vitamins and minerals that can be dangerous to our health?
             – Diane Summerton, Waukesha, WI
Added nutrients in the processed foods we eat could indeed be too much of a good thing, especially for kids. According to a report from non-profit health research and advocacy group Environmental Working Group (EWG), nearly half of American kids aged eight and under “consume potentially harmful amounts of vitamin A, zinc and niacin because of excessive food fortification, outdated nutritional labeling rules and misleading marketing tactics used by food manufacturers.” EWG’s analysis for the “How Much Is Too Much?” report focused on two frequently fortified food categories: breakfast cereals and snack bars.
Of the 1,550 common cereals studied by EWG, 114 (including Total Raisin Bran, Wheaties Fuel, Cocoa Krispies, Krave and others) were fortified with 30 percent or more of the adult Daily Value for vitamin A, zinc and/or niacin. And 27 of 1,000 brands of snack bars studied (including Balance, Kind and Marathon bars) were fortified with 50 percent or more of the adult Daily Value for at least one of these nutrients. EWG researchers based their analysis on Nutrition Facts labels on the various food items’ packaging.
“Heavily fortified foods may sound like a good thing, but it when it comes to children and pregnant women, excessive exposure to high nutrient levels could actually cause short or long-term health problems,” says EWG research director Renee Sharp, who co-authored the report.  “Manufacturers use vitamin and mineral fortification to sell their products, adding amounts in excess of what people need and more than might be prudent for young children to consume.”
Sharp adds that excessive levels of vitamin A can lead to skeletal abnormalities, liver damage and hair loss, while high doses of zinc can impede copper absorption, compromise red and white blood cells and impair immune function. Also, too much vitamin A during pregnancy can lead to fetal developmental issues. And older adults who get too much vitamin A are at more risk for osteoporosis and hip fractures.
EWG suggests it’s time to overhaul our food labeling system to better account for how ingredients may affect children as well as adults. “In other words, when a parent picks up a box of cereal and sees that one serving provides 50 percent of the Daily Value for vitamin A, he or she may think that it provides 50 percent of a child’s recommended intake,” says EWG researcher and report co-author Olga Naidenko. “But he or she would most likely be wrong, since the Daily Values are based on an adult’s dietary needs.”
EWG is working on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to update its guidelines for Nutrition Facts to better reflect how foods affect children as well as adults. In the meantime, parents might want to consider scaling back on fortified foods for their kids in favor of so-called whole foods (unprocessed, unrefined fruits, vegetables and whole grains) that deliver the right amounts of nutrients naturally.
“Research consistently shows that the nutrient amounts and types found in whole foods provide optimal nutrition as well as least risk,” says Ashley Koff, a registered dietitian and a former ad executive for kid’s cereals and snack bars. “We owe it to parents and kids to make it easiest to choose better quality foods.”
See EWG’s “How Much Is Too Much?” report, www.ewg.org/research/how-much-is-too-much.
EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com.

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Officials urge residents to vaccinate against whooping cough

As Michigan continues to see new pertussis cases this year, the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) is reminding residents during National Immunization Awareness Month of the importance of being up to date on all vaccinations including pertussis, also known as whooping cough. Through the end of July, Michigan has seen 546 cases, about 45 percent more than in the same period of 2013. Several other states, including Ohio, California, and Florida, are reporting similar increases.
“Children are routinely recommended to receive a series of pertussis vaccine doses in infancy and early childhood,” said Dr. Matthew Davis, chief medical executive of MDCH. “Adolescents and adults should receive a booster dose of the vaccine. In addition, pregnant women should get a booster in the third trimester of each pregnancy to help protect newborns, who are most vulnerable to the illness in the first few months of life.”
Pertussis is a respiratory infection caused by a bacterium that results in a prolonged illness. Severe coughing episodes are often accompanied by vomiting and difficulty breathing.  In some cases, a characteristic “whooping” noise is heard as the afflicted person tries to catch their breath. Once extremely common, vaccines developed in the US starting in the mid-1940s and helped drive down the occurrence of pertussis. But in recent decades, pertussis has been making a comeback.
“Part of the challenge,” Davis explained, “is that immunity to pertussis wears off, so getting a booster vaccine dose later in life can help extend the protection. Our primary focus is on preventing the disease in babies; they have smaller airways and less developed respiratory systems, which puts them at higher risk for severe cases as well as hospitalization and death from pertussis.”
Babies get a first dose of the vaccine at two months of age, but they are not optimally protected until completing the series of several more doses over the next year and half. MDCH strongly recommends that adults or adolescents who will be around infants receive the recommended pertussis booster vaccine dose, and that all residents receive their vaccines on time.
If you are uncertain about whether you or your children have had all recommended vaccines and doses, speak with your doctor or contact your local health department. For more information about pertussis, or any recommended or required vaccine, visit www.michigan.gov/immunize.

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Healthy lunch and snack ideas for back to school

BACK-Healthy-lunch-and-snack-ideas
(BPT) – If schools and parents received report cards on the lunches they’re serving kids, most wouldn’t receive a passing score. Many lunches, whether served at school or brought from home, are made with bleached flour, artificial sweeteners, food coloring, high-fructose corn syrup, artificial preservatives, hormones and trans fats. Studies have shown that these ingredients are linked to weight gain, defects in insulin and lipid metabolism, hyperactivity, increased risk of tumors, cancer, digestive issues, asthma, premature heart attacks, diabetes, and overexposure and resistance to antibiotics. Some of these ingredients are even banned in other countries.
As a parent, what can you do to keep your child healthy? Life Time – The Healthy Way of Life Company, suggests checking in with your child’s school to learn where foods are sourced, the nutritional values and ingredients in order to make informed decisions.
“The more highly processed foods are, the more likely they are to contain the seven unsavory ingredients. Meaning they are foods it’s best to find alternatives for,” says Laura Burbank, a registered dietitian with the Life Time Foundation.
“We encourage parents to speak with school nutrition directors and cafeteria managers about reducing the amount of highly processed and artificial items served in their lunch rooms, in favor of wholesome, real foods, and we’re able to help parents throughout that process,” Burbank says.
Until changes are made, Burbank advises actively engaging kids—starting when they’re young—in packing lunch at home. “Getting kids involved in packing their lunches makes them more likely to eat and enjoy them,” says Burbank. “They feel helpful and they’re learning along the way.” She says it’s important to include a protein, whole grains, fresh fruit, vegetables and healthy fats with every meal, and provides some ideas below.
Lunch box option one:

* Lunch: turkey or ham sandwich with avocado and spinach on whole grain bread. Look for meat that is free of hormones, antibiotics, nitrates, artificial preservatives and other additives.
* Snack: orange slices and string cheese.
Lunch box option two:

* Lunch: grilled chicken breast, avocado and roasted bell pepper or shredded carrots in a whole grain pita with a Greek yogurt based dressing or pesto.
* Snack: apple slices and almond butter. If your child’s school has a strict nut-free lunchroom guideline, include Greek yogurt with vanilla and/or honey.
Lunch box option three:

* Lunch: a wholesome PB&J made with almond butter and 100 percent fruit preserves on whole grain bread.
* Snack: hard boiled eggs, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers with Greek yogurt based vegetable dipping sauce, or pita chips and peppers with hummus.
Healthier lunch room choices
Burbank notes that sometimes making lunch at home isn’t a viable option. If that’s the case, she suggests parents discuss healthy lunch room options with their kids, as studies have shown that in addition to nutritional benefits, healthier diets also associate with higher academic performance. Things to consider include:
* Choose a salad when available to include more vegetables in the meal.
* Choose white milk over chocolate milk to cut down on sugar intake.
* Choose 1 percent milk over skim or non-fat milk, the higher fat content is more satiating.
* Choose whole grain pasta over bread that may contain bleached flour and preservatives.
* Choose red pasta sauce (vegetable-based) over cream sauce (high in fat).
* Choose fresh fruit over canned fruit which may contain artificial colors, preservatives and sweeteners.
Parents should also be encouraged to talk to the nutrition directors and cafeteria managers about reducing the amount of highly processed and artificial items in the school meals. The Life Time Foundation is a great resource for more information on this.
The Life Time Foundation partners with schools to help them remove highly processed and artificial ingredients from school meals by providing resources and assisting with menu development. For more information on how your school can get involved, visit www.ltffoundation.org.

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CS tennis wins Sparta invitational

Doubles team Jon Baculy serving the ball and Ethan Brown ready for a return from the opposing team.

Doubles team Jon Baculy serving the ball and Ethan Brown ready for a return from the opposing team.

Red Hawk tennis team with first place trophy.

Red Hawk tennis team with first place trophy.

The Cedar Springs boys’ varsity tennis team took first place at the Sparta Invitational on Wednesday, August 20.
Singles and doubles team members played matches against Sparta, Coopersville and Fremont to gain their first place finish. According to scores reported at MLive.com, Cedar finished with 17 points, Sparta came in second with 15, Coopersville, 12, and Fremont, 3.
Taking wins in the finals for Cedar Springs were Nick Fennessy, #2 singles; Drew French, #4 singles; and #2 doubles Jon Baculy and Ethan Brown.
This year’s tennis team, coached by Katie Unsworth and Assistant coach Mike Gariepy, consists of 12 players: senior Nick Fennessy; juniors Ethan Brown, Jesse Empie, and Blake Fisk; sophomores Jon Baculy, Carson Dingman, Drew French, Dylan Kolasa, Jared Liggett, Austin Nielson, and Tim Shovan; and freshman Nick Hibbs.

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