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Brides-to-be: use best practices with bankrupt retailers

 

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette called attention to best practices to be used by Michigan consumers, in this case brides-to-be, when protecting themselves from bankrupt retailers. This notice results from the nationwide shutdown of bridal gown retailer, Alfred Angelo, which has left brides across Michigan wondering if they’ll be without a dress and without a refund on their wedding day.

“When businesses announce bankruptcies overnight, employees and consumers alike are left with frustration, fear, and uncertainty,” said Schuette. “The best thing to do is to take the necessary steps to limit your financial loss, protect your privacy, and reach a solution.”

Concerned customers can visit the Better Business Bureau’s report on Alfred Angelo’s closure at http://bbb.org/h/jubg where updates will be posted as more information becomes available. If you wish to be contacted regarding your order status once information is available, you can send an email to: alfredangelo@mjstrustee.com.

In the meantime, Schuette warned Michigan residents to beware of online donations and crowdfunding pages. When unfortunate events occur, it attracts potential scammers who are looking to take advantage of the situation. Beware of anyone who claims they can help you retrieve your dress from a store for a fee, or any crowdfunding pages looking to raise money for a dress they lost. Only communicate with a designated bankruptcy trustee.

Business Sudden Closure Consumer Tips

Additional best practices are listed in the Attorney General’s Business Sudden Closure Consumer Alert, and include steps to take to protect yourself when any business suddenly closes. (Go to Michigan.gov/ag and click on consumer alerts under resources, then shopping for products and services, then sudden business closures.) Most important, consumers need to act quickly to protect their rights and to help the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division investigate, and hopefully resolve, disputes that arise when a business suddenly closes.  Specific steps include:

The First Step: Limit Your Financial Loss

When faced with the sudden closure of a business, consumers who made purchases but have not received all of the goods or services they contracted for should immediately determine their method of payment and act accordingly:

  • If you paid with a credit card, contact your credit card company to dispute the charges and have all related charges removed from your bill.  You should be able to find information regarding how to dispute charges on your monthly statements.
  • If you paid by check, contact your bank to determine if you can stop any payment.
  • If you arranged for long-term financing, contact the financing company and dispute any payment for goods or services that have not been delivered.
  • If you arranged for some form of automatic payment plan, contact your bank or credit union to immediately stop any future withdrawals from your account.

The Second Step:  File a Complaint If a Business Closes And They Fail to Deliver Goods or Services

If a business unexpectedly closes, and they fail to deliver goods or services, you should file a complaint as soon as possible to help minimize any potential loss and maximize the Consumer Protection Division›s ability to intervene.  The Consumer Protection Division will try to recover as much as possible for consumers before a business files for bankruptcy.

  • Call the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division at 1-877-765-8388, and file an online Consumer Complaint using our website: michigan.gov/ag
  • If a business is located out of state, also file a complaint with that state’s Attorney General.
  • Gather receipts, invoices, or bills that show what items were ordered, what you paid, and when delivery was promised.
  • Document all transactions in order to assist investigators and to support any possible legal claims.
  • Keep any phone records or any notes that indicate which company employees you spoke with and when those conversations occurred.
  • Try to contact the company’s headquarters or “customer service” line or use their website to lodge a formal complaint with the company.

Protecting Your Privacy: A Business Closure and Your Personal Information

Even if a business suddenly closes, that business is still required to protect your personal financial information.

Complaints

Consumers may file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division:

Consumer Protection Division

P.O. Box 30213, Lansing, MI 48909

517-373-1140, Fax: 517-241-3771

Toll free: 877-765-8388

Online Complaint Form

https://secure.ag.state.mi.us/complaints/consumer.aspx

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Good Gravy, Look Who’s Gonna Be 80!

SHIRLEY MERLINGTON

Friends and family are invited to an open house to wish Shirley Merlington a happy 80th birthday on Sunday, July 23rd from 11 am to 2 pm at the American Legion hall in Cedar Springs. You don’t need to bring gifts, just your smiling faces!

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JOYCE “JO” LESPERANCE & JACOB J. GROVER

JOYCE “JO” LESPERANCE

June 2, 1946 – June 25, 2004

 

JACOB J. GROVER

February 21, 1942 – July 30, 2004

Gone thirteen years and deeply missed by spouses, relatives and friends

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Thank You

The family of Joseph Watson Sr. would like to thank our family and friends for the huge outpouring of love and support during these most difficult days. Dad’s love of people came back to us tenfold, we are indeed blessed.

Love,

Florence Watson and family

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A thin line

Pastor Robert Smith

First Baptist Church

233 Main St., Cedar Springs

 

There is a difference between a Thinline edition of the Bible and a perspective that views the Bible as thin. I view one as helpful in ministry and I view the other as harmful. One makes Truth easy to grasp and the other loses the grip on Truth.

What is meant by the perspective that the Bible is “thin?” First, the use of the word “thin” implies that the Bible lacks substance, fullness, or abundance in meaning or purpose. In other words, the Bible is irrelevant. It doesn’t really address, at least with any substantive meaning, the real issues that touch our lives.

A second matter for us to consider, which is nearly as dangerous as the first, is seeing the Bible as merely a book of rules. Yes. There are commandments in the Bible, but the Bible is not a book of do’s and don’ts. The Bible tells us what has been done for us that we cannot do. It tells us of God’s one and only Son, Jesus, and why He came into the world. It tells us of the kind of life that Jesus called “abundant.”

A third matter, which is as dangerous as the second one, is to think of the Bible as merely a resource that one might turn to in order to find comfort in a time of crisis or to find wisdom in making a decision. Those who hold this view of the Bible genuinely believe it offers some general help, but not enough for the hard issues of life.

The Bible is not thin. It’s thick. It’s substantive. It is full of meaning. It’s rich in wisdom. Its abundance overflows to address every daily matter of meaning and purpose of our lives. If this is true, and it is, then why do people not see its relevance? Or for those who do, why do they see it merely as a resource, as if the Bible is one among many voices?

The Bible is more than rules for a well-ordered life. It’s more than a resource for some of the issues of life. It is relevant in all of life’s areas. It is God’s revelation of Himself. It will awaken and revive a soul to real life!

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CSBrewery Shoppe

Cedar Springs Brewing Company is now using the retail space next door at 81 N. Main St. that was vacated by Coldbreak Brewing to sell a variety of brewing and wine-making equipment and other supplies.

You can also find a variety of Cedar Springs Brewing Company merchandise at the location.

Coldbreak Brewing, who was renting the space from the CS Brewing Company, decided to return their focus to manufacturing their equipment and no longer need the space.

The CSBrewery Shoppe also plans to offer classes in brewing beer, and in making wine, cider, and mead.

Stop in and see them today! Hours are 12:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

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Wireless Zone backpack giveaway

Cedar Springs Wireless Zone, 4021 17 Mile Rd, is working to alleviate the rising costs of school supplies by giving away 200 backpacks to school children this Sunday, July 23, from 1-4 p.m. The giveaway is part of the annual School Rocks Backpack Giveaway in partnership with The Cellular Connection (TCC) and Culture of Good.

According to Renee Doren, general manager at Wireless Zone, an authorized Verizon retailer, the canvas backpacks will come in six colors, and will come with notebooks, pencils, rulers, a pencil box, and glue sticks.

Both the parent and child must be present to claim the backpack.

On hand at the event will be Cedar Springs Fire Department, Solon Fire Department, and the Kent County Sheriff Department. There will also be pop, popcorn, sidewalk chalk, and bubbles.

“It will be three hours of fun,” remarked Doren. “We expect a huge turn out and are so excited to give back to our community!”

This is the first year that Wireless Zone has participated in the event. TCC, who bought the Wireless Zone franchise last year, gave away 235,000 backpacks last year in a nationwide event.

For more info, call 696-2395.

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En Gedi accepted into KidCents program

En Gedi, a free, non-profit after-school youth center for students in 6-8th grades, has been accepted as a qualifying participant in Rite Aid’s KidCents Program. Rite Aid also donated $5,000 to kick off their support.

“Rite Aid has long been committed to helping communities live well,” explained assistant store manager Melinda Silliman.

Sharlene Kent, long time Rite Aid employee and Cedar Springs resident, has worked for about two years to identify a worthy non-profit organization to partner with Rite Aid on this program.

Kent said, “I am thrilled Pastor Craig Owens, En Gedi Youth Center Executive Director, applied and was accepted for this program. The Rite Aid Foundation’s mission centers around children’s health and well-being, having donated over $80 million to help kids. I felt En Gedi would align with Rite Aid’s mission. Now, our Cedar Springs area children will be recipients of funds from the Rite Aid Foundation.”

Rite Aid will continue to donate to En Gedi as their customers round up to the nearest dollar through KidCents.

En Gedi, a Christ-centered organization, serves an average of 65 students per day with approximately 120 individual students participating throughout the school year. Special high school and community events are also hosted to align with the En Gedi mission of strengthening the community through the building up of families.

All funding for En Gedi is provided through corporate and personal donations primarily at the annual Fund Raising Auction each spring.

“The KidsCents Program will be a wonderful opportunity for local residents to donate by simply saying “Round Up for En Gedi” when checking out by using their Wellness + Card at any Rite Aid store,” shared Owens. “This donation is greatly appreciated and will significantly help continue the efforts of the En Gedi team.”

For details on En Gedi visit the website of www.EnGediYouthCenter.com or Facebook. To learn how you can participate with the KidsCents Program just ask Sharlene Kent or any Rite Aid staff member.

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Kyam Gorby, 7-year-old son of Nate and Lynn Gorby, caught a 14-inch rainbow trout at a private pond owned by friends of his Malmo grandparents.

“I’ve always wanted to catch one of these!” exclaimed Kyam.

Congratulations, Kyam, on a great catch!

 

It’s back—get out those cameras!

It’s that time of year again when anglers big and small like to tell their fish tales! Send us a photo and story of your first, best, funniest, biggest, or even your smallest catch. Include your name, age, address, and phone number, along with the type and size of fish, and where caught.  We can’t wait to hear from you! Photos published as space allows. Photos/stories may be sent by email to news@cedarspringspost.com with Catch of the Week in the subject line, or mail to: Catch of the Week, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

 

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Rogue River butterfly count 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

The weather was great with sunny skies and little wind. Eight participants enjoyed butterflies, learned identification and associations with nature niche habitats. Thirty species sighted on count day are listed in Table 1 with the number of individuals and participants. We began at the Howard Christensen Nature Center for our 30th count year at 9 a.m. Counting began at HCNC’s Welcome Center. The group car-pooled to various Rogue River State Game Area locations within the count circle.

We visited the highest elevation in Kent County at Fisk Knob where we anticipated “hill topping” Black Swallowtails but none were present. We know what species to expect based on normal flight dates but some species are not present because we either missed them or their flight schedule is different from our count date in a given year.

During the day, butterfly behavior is observed and described to help make the count a wonderful experience. Larval host plants are inspected for caterpillars or eggs. One Viceroy larva was found on aspen this year. The eight participants spent most time looking for adults and counting individuals.

The total number of species observed has varied over the 30 years from 18 to 43. Weather effects butterfly activity. Sunny days with little or no wind in the 70’s and 80’s is ideal. Adults often emerge from pupae following a soaking rain. I was surprised that a few species we normally find were not present. The flowering plants and apparently some butterflies seem to have delayed emergence this year. We had a cool spring but I expected the warm days in June would allow species to get back on schedule. Activity is closely linked with blooming of nectar sources.

Consider joining the 2018 counts next July. Watch the Nature Niche column for next year’s dates for the Allegan, Muskegon, and Rogue River State Game Area Counts as well as the Newaygo Count in the Manistee National Forest. Books and Internet web sites help learning but it is best experienced by exploring the real world. Time outdoors is enjoyable, healthy, and provides family time that creates wonderful memories. People can join for part of the day.

Other count results will be posted on the West Michigan Butterfly Association (WMBA) Web Site by August. Consider becoming a member of WMBA for $5/yr. A check can be sent to our treasurer Dennis Dunlap, 2599 W. Chester Dr., Zeeland, MI 49464 and his address is also posted on the web site (http://www.graud.org/wmba.html). The date for the Muskegon count is 22 July 2017 so there is still opportunity to participate. Visit the WMBA web site for location directions.

Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary is the last place we visit after diligently searching all day. I am always hopeful we will be able to find at least one species we have not discovered elsewhere during the day. This year we added the Appalachian Brown. During count week, which is the three days before and after count day, we saw two Harvesters, 1 Mourning Cloak, and 1 Hobomok Skipper at Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary. Those species and numbers of individuals are not included in the count day list. They are listed as an addendum to the report and turned in to the North American Butterfly Association.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

 

click link to download results: 2017 Rogue River Butterfly Ct.pdf

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