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Three northern Kent County residents hurt in Lowell crash

A Rockford man is in critical condition and a Cedar Springs couple is in stable condition after a traffic accident in Lowell Township Sunday morning, October 26.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, Joseph Kelly, 66, of Rockford, was driving a 1999 Chevrolet Prism southbound on Segwun Avenue, about 9:26 a.m., when he failed to stop at the stop sign at Cascade Road. He was hit by an eastbound 2013 Chevrolet Malibu, driven by David Ladd, 65, of Cedar Springs.

Both vehicles drove off the roadway and into a field. Kelly was not responsive at the accident scene and was transported by Aeromed to Spectrum Butterworth Hospital. He is in critical condition at this time. Lad,d and his wife, Vickie,63, were transported by ambulance to Spectrum. They are in stable condition.

The accident is still under investigation at this time. Neither Alcohol nor speed appear to be factors.

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Traveler in Kent County being monitored for Ebola

N-Kent-County-logoThe Kent County Health Department said today that they are monitoring a traveler who visited a country where an Ebola outbreak has been declared. They said the individual did not provide care for or have contact with anyone who has Ebola, and has a very low risk for Ebola infection by CDC standards. The person is not exhibiting any signs of illness, and the Kent County Health Department will continue to contact the person twice a day over the 21 day surveillance period to monitor for symptoms and report their measured body temperature, as recommended by the MDCH and CDC. No further information regarding the traveler is being made public.

“The Kent County Health Department is sharing this information to remain open and transparent, and most importantly, to recognize that this is the first notification of a traveler, and it probably won’t be the last,” said Adam London, Kent County Health Department Officer. “The most important take-away from this is that this is not an imminent health threat, and this individual is at very low risk for illness. We want the general public to remain informed, and trust in our capabilities.”

Kent County was notified of the traveler as a result the of the CDC airport monitoring system. This week, the CDC started a program to actively monitor all individuals who arrive in the United States after travel to Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone. All air travelers with this travel history are now being routed through five major airports (Atlanta, Dulles, Newark, JFK and O’Hare) where screening for Ebola symptoms and risk factors will take place. This information is entered into a national system and is then provided to state health departments for distribution to local health departments, who are responsible for monitoring the health of these travelers.

“Increased surveillance and monitoring has been critical in recent weeks and will continue to be critical as long as there are cases of Ebola in the world,” said London. “Contact tracing and monitoring has been extremely successful in Senegal and Nigeria, where Ebola outbreaks were contained and now, the countries are Ebola-free. We have confidence in the systems and protocols that are in place, and Kent County is fully prepared to monitor anyone with a travel history to an Ebola outbreak region.”

The Kent County Health Department (KCHD) continues to work with local partners and state and federal agencies to stay on top of the Ebola outbreak. Ebola is a rare, serious viral infection. It is not airborne or waterborne. A person infected with Ebola is not contagious until symptoms appear, which can take up to 21 days. The virus only spreads by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of a person who has symptoms. Although the initial signs and symptoms of Ebola are flu-like in nature (i.e. fever, headache, muscle pain), health care workers and the family and friends who provide care for a person sick with Ebola are at highest risk for infection and the general public should not be concerned about Ebola if they develop flu-like symptoms. Risk factors for Ebola have not changed and include recent travel history to Sierra Leone, Guinea or Liberia or direct contact with someone who is sick with or died from Ebola.

It is important to note that the Ebola virus does not show up in a blood test until the person is showing symptoms, and there are only 12 labs in the U.S. that can test for Ebola. Therefore, the CDC has very pointed, specific guidance about the testing process, and must approve any testing. Results can take 24 to 48 hours to confirm.

Last week, the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) was reactivated. MMRS is a program that supports the integration of emergency management, health, and medical systems into a coordinated response to mass casualty incidents caused by any hazard. MMRS is operating to ensure a coordinated response between public health, first responders, law enforcement, hospitals, and community leaders. KCHD continues to be in contact with their partners in MMRS on a regular basis as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols and guidance continue to evolve.

KCHD will provide updates as necessary at www.accesskent.com/Health/ebola.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fake bomb threat at Rockford Schools

Rockford RamAuthorities determined that a bomb threat at Rockford Public Schools earlier today was “not credible.”

Superintendent Mike Shibler reportedly received an anonymous email Friday morning stating that a bomb would go off in each of their 13 buildings and that he should be concerned.

The Rockford Department of Public Safety worked with the Kent County Sheriff Department, Michigan State Police, FBI and Rockford Public School Security to investigate. They said it was quickly determined the threat was not credible. Area law enforcement and Homeland Security are investigating the source of the anonymous threat.

As precautionary measure, thorough searches were conducted on the interior and exterior of all schools buildings. All schools proceeded through the day as normal.

They said that at no time were the students in any danger.

 

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Halloween Happenings

Halloween-leadin

Check out some of the fun, fall activities going on in our area for Halloween!

 

MCC Haunted Indoor Forest

Oct. 24, 25: Montcalm Community College Art Club hosts a Haunted Indoor Forest from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 24 and Saturday, October 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Instruction North Building, on the college’s Sidney campus. A $2 donation is suggested.

Harvest Brains at Sand Lake/Nelson Library

Oct. 25: Program for teens, at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, October 25. Save your brains! Build a survival bag, practice your aim, and learn what it takes to stay alive during a zombie apocalypse. The library is located at 88 Eighth St., Sand Lake.

Harvest party

Oct. 25: Cedar Creek Community Church, at 2969 14 Mile RD NE Sparta, will host a harvest party on Saturday, October 25, from 5-8 p.m. There will be hayrides (using straw due to allergies), pumpkin painting, dunking for apples, cake walk, games, face painting, soup, hot dogs, popcorn, and lots of fun! All are welcome. Call 866-9829 for more info.

Pumpkin Carving and Lit Trails Walk

Oct. 25: Pumpkin/Carving and Pumpkin lit trail hike from 5-8:30 p.m. at Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, on Saturday, October 25. Suggested donation is $8 per person or $30 for family of four or more, including pumpkin to take home. (No one turned away for inability to pay. This donation helps keep HCNC operating.) Pumpkin carving from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and pumpkin lit walk through our spooky Enchanted Forest from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (Friendly enough for your toddlers. Non scary animals will be on display in the forest, weather permitting for the mock-animals). Includes pumpkin to take home or leave at the center for the wild animals to munch on. Dress up as your favorite nature character. Open to all ages.

Trunk ‘r Treat at Courtland-Oakfield UMC 

Oct. 25: It’s our fourth annual Trunk ‘r Treat for kids of all ages. Saturday, October 25, 5:30-7:00 p.m. at Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake NE. Candy outdoors; hot dogs & baked beans indoors.

Trunk or Treat at East Nelson UMC

Oct. 25: Bring your kids and come “Trunk or Treat” at East Nelson UM Church, 9024 18 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs on Saturday, October 25 from 5-7 p.m. Warm up with hot chocolate and sloppy joes. Games and fun for all.

Fall Festival  

Oct. 29: Fall Festival for all ages at the Solon Center Wesleyan Church, 15671 Algoma Ave., Cedar Springs on Wednesday, October 29, from 6:30- 8 p.m. For families with children 5th grade and under. Games, prizes, snacks, boy and girl door prizes and candy, candy, candy! The church is located on Algoma, just north of 19 Mile Road.

Nightmare on Cherry Street

Oct. 30: Calling all 4th to 6th graders!  You are officially invited to come to our “Nightmare on Cherry Street” party at the Cedar Springs Library! The fun, games, and food will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 30 and go until 7:30. Registration is required, so come into the library to sign up or call 616-696-1910

Trick or Treat Trail Walk

Oct. 31: From 3-5 p.m. on Halloween, bring your kiddos by Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, to take a short walk down one of our trails to collect some candy, so we don’t get tricked!

Cedar Springs Spooktacular

Oct. 31:  The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, businesses and churches in Cedar Springs are sponsoring the annual Main Street Halloween Spooktacular on Friday, October 31. Some of the free events include: spooky storytelling and crafts at the Cedar Springs Public Library, 4:30 p.m.; a haunted school house at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park 5-7 p.m.; a Kids Carnival, hosted by Calvary Assembly of God 5-7 p.m.; Trick-or-Treating at local businesses between 5-7pm; and Trunk or Treat at The Springs Church from 6 to 8 p.m. (see more details below).

Kids carnival

Oct. 31: Calvary Assembly of God will be presenting a free carnival during the Chamber of Commerce’s Spooktacular event from 5-7pm on Friday, October 31. The carnival will be at the corner of Ash and Main Street, next to DJ Nails, and will have lots of family-friendy games, with prizes and candy.

Haunted school house

Oct. 31: The Haunted School House is back this year at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park from 5-7 p.m. again. Nolan Patin has worked up another fun spooky event for the museum. We do adapt our spookiness when young children are coming through and will be handing out treats.

Trunk or Treat at The Springs

Oct. 31: Creative costumes—check. Oodles of goodies—check. Lots of giggles and loads of fun—doublecheck! You’ll experience it all at The Springs Church at Trunk or Treat on Halloween night from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be lots of candy for the taking, carnival games, a giant slide, and refreshments. It will be fun for the whole family, and a safe, well-lit environment for kids. The church is located at 135 N. Grant St., in Cedar Springs.

Traffic Squad/Fire Department

Oct. 31: There will be cider, donuts and candy at the Cedar Springs Fire Department on Maple Street from 5 to 7 p.m. or while supplies last.

Halloween Hospitality Center

Oct. 31: Warm up station at the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, 140 S. Main Street, Cedar Springs, on Friday, October 31, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Serving hot chocolate and popcorn, everyone is welcome to join us.

Halloween party – Courtland Fire

Oct 31:  Stop by the Halloween party at the Courtland Fire station #2, 9535 Myers Lake road from 5-9 p.m. Games, snacks candy, cider, coffee,  car trunks with treats welcome. Sponsored by women auxiliary, and many stores in the area.

Family Harvest Celebration

Oct. 31: Pine Ridge Bible Camp invites you to its annual Family Harvest Celebration on Friday, October 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. This free event includes hayride, games, puppet show, cider, donuts and trip through Treat Town. Please bring a bag for collecting treats. It is a fun night for the whole family. Costumes welcome but not necessary. Please no witches, ghosts, monsters, etc. Pine Ridge is located just 5 miles east of town at 8415 17 Mile Rd. Call 616-696-8675 for more information.

Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church

Oct. 31: Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church, 4780 Cornfield Drive, Cedar Springs, from 6-8 p.m. There will be games and prizes, candy for the kids, hot dogs and chips available.

Ghostbusters at the Kent Theatre

Oct. 31, Nov. 1, Nov.2: Don’t let the Halloween weekend go by without spending some time at the Kent Theatre. A special showing of Ghostbusters will be on the big screen October 31, November 1 and 2, in celebration of Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary. Now in digital format, watch your favorite ghost busting team in action! Showing Halloween night at 6 and 9 p.m., Saturday at 3, 6 and 9 p.m. and Sunday at 3 and 6 pm. Tickets are only $3.00.

Sand Lake Fire Department

Oct. 31: The Sand Lake Fireman’s Association will host their annual Halloween festivities at the fire station at 2 Maple Street in Sand Lake from 6-8 p.m. There will be games, a bounce house, prize drawings, goody bags, cider, donuts, and coffee. There will also be a costume contest. Judging is at 7:15, must be present to win the contest. Call 636-8854 for more info.

Trick or Treat at Meadowlark

Oct. 31: Meadowlark Retirement Village in Sparta loves having trick or treaters. Their doors will be open from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 31. The residents can’t wait to see all the kids dressed up! Meadowlark is located at 65 Ida Red Ave, Sparta. Call 887-8891 ext. 102 for more info.

 

 

 

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Fresh Market: The Pumpkin—a Halloween tradition

HAL-FreshMarket-Pumpkin

By Vicky Babcock

Google “pumpkin” and you will find everything from riots in (Keene) New Hampshire to Ichabod Crane’s unfortunate encounter with the headless horseman, to pumpkin scones. We have pumpkin festivals, pumpkin carving contests, smashing pumpkins, pumpkin tossing, pumpkin baking and biggest pumpkin contests.

A true Native American, the pumpkin has been embraced by our cultures as both an important food source for people and livestock, and an excellent medium for carving. Something about these colorful canvasses really stirs the creative juices in artists of all ages! Throw in a candle and you have a lovely Jack-o-lantern. With its growing season complete from early to mid October, is it any wonder that this vibrantly colored fruit has become synonymous with Halloween? Yet pumpkins have a relatively short history with the holiday known as Halloween, which is believed to have evolved from the ancient festival of Samhain. It has its origins in European culture. Samhain was the Celtic harvest festival, a time to stock up supplies for the winter. The ancient Gaels believed the final day in October to be a time when the two worlds (the living and the dead) overlapped allowing the dead to return to Earth and cause havoc among the living. Offerings from the harvest were left outside their doors to appease the spirits in an effort to prevent them from bringing sickness and blight to the crops. Door to door begging, or “souling,” (a precursor to our modern day trick-or-treat) came much later and was associated with All Souls Day.

Our native pumpkin entered into the holiday when Irish immigrants brought the tradition of the Jack-o-lantern—originally a carved turnip or gourd—to the U.S. during the 1700s. Turnips had their drawbacks; they were relatively small and dense, with no pre-formed cavity in which to place a lit coal. With its broad base and large capacity, the pumpkin quickly became the preferred medium for the practice. Today, a large percentage of fresh bought pumpkins lends itself to this Halloween tradition, decorating our porches and giving young artists a chance to stretch their creative wings. Once used as a welcoming light for the spirits of our loved ones and to ward off any malevolent spirits, the Jack-o-Lantern has become a Halloween fantasy, a joyful pastime and a profitable market for farmers of the crop. Unfortunately, few of us these days consume pumpkin that does not come out of a can.

Unfortunate, because pumpkin, one of the winter squashes, is an excellent source of dietary nutrition. Pumpkins are rich in beta-carotene, an important antioxidant, which the body uses to convert to vitamin A. Foods rich in beta-carotene have been linked to lower risk of certain cancers and offer protection against heart disease as well as an aid in the degenerative aspects of aging. Pumpkin is high in potassium and dietary fiber as well, necessary nutrients for the heart and digestive tract respectively. A cup of cooked pumpkin contains about 49 calories, a dieter’s dream!

So, as you carve your pumpkins this year, consider using the cut outs (minus the rind) in soups, stews or rice dishes. Or try some pumpkin chili. Any way you slice it, it comes out deliciously nutritious.

Like pumpkins—and despite its ancestry—Halloween is a true American treat. With the mix of cultures that make up today’s Halloween, what greater place to celebrate than the Great Melting Pot of the world? Have a safe and happy Halloween. And happy “souling.”

 

Pumpkin Chili

1 ½ pounds lean ground beef

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, diced

2 large carrots, washed and diced (ends removed)

2 cups fresh pumpkin, peeled and diced

1 jar salsa—medium heat

1 15-oz can diced tomatoes

2 cans black beans, rinsed and drained

Chili powder (to taste)

In a large skillet, brown beef. Drain most of the oils and remove beef to a Dutch oven. In saucepan in remaining oil, cook and stir onion, garlic, carrots and pumpkin for about two minutes, until onion is tender. Drain the rest of the oil and add to the beef. Add remaining ingredients except for the chili powder. Cook and stir until boiling. Reduce heat and add chili powder to taste. This will gain some heat as it cooks, so start lightly. Cook over med to low heat about 30 minutes or until pumpkin is tender and flavors have mixed. Add additional chili powder about 15 minutes into the cooking process if you wish.

Serve with grated cheese, crushed corn chips (I like Frito’s™ Chili Cheese) and sour cream if desired. Other additions include chopped fresh onions or chopped bell peppers. This is even better the next day.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

 

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Fall colors 

We asked for your beautiful fall photos, and many of you took the time to post them on our Facebook page. The photos on this page show the splendor of the fall colors in the West Michigan area.

Now is the time to take a drive and take in all the beautiful fall colors Michigan has to offer. Get out and see them before they are gone. You are sure to be delighted with the colors in this fall’s fashion show!

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Pedestrian dies in accident

A man died Friday evening after being hit by a vehicle while trying to cross 17 Mile Road in Cedar Springs.

A man died Friday evening after being hit by a vehicle while trying to cross 17 Mile Road in Cedar Springs.

A man was killed on 17 Mile Road in Cedar Springs about 6 p.m. Friday evening, October 17, while crossing the street.

Police identified the man as Bruce Hickman, 53, of the City of Cedar Springs.

Chief Chad Potts said the man had just left a store and was trying to cross the road.

A witness at the scene told the Post that while he was waiting to pull out of the Family Fare driveway, he saw the victim on the south side of the road, near the mailbox at 4186 17 Mile (just east of the Cedar Christian Academy sign), enter the roadway heading north. The witness looked away to the west, and when he looked back east, he saw the man get hit by a westbound vehicle.

The vehicle skidded to a stop in front of Choice One Bank.

Chief Potts said that according to another witness, the victim looked west before he crossed the road, but not east.

First responders gave the man CPR, but he did not survive his injuries. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Alcohol was not a factor on the part of the driver. A toxicology report on the victim is not yet available.

Cedar Springs Police, the Kent County Sheriff Department, Cedar Springs Fire and Rescue, and Rockford Ambulance all assisted at the scene.

The accident is still under investigation.

A memorial service for Mr. Hickman, reportedly a longtime resident of an adult foster care home here in Cedar Springs, is set for Thursday, October 23, at the Pentecostal Church of Kentwood, 2627 44th St. SE, Kentwood, from 6-8 p.m.

 

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Trick or treat in Cedar Springs

 

Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

It’s only one week until Halloween—are you ready for a night full of fun? Does the thought greeting scores of trick or treaters make you break out in a cold sweat? Forget staying home! Pack up the kids and come out Halloween night for the Annual Cedar Springs Halloween Spooktacular in Cedar Springs! Sponsored by the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, area businesses and churches, the fun starts at 4:30 p.m. with spooky storytime at the library, at the corner of Cherry and Second. That is followed by trick or treating from 5 to 7 p.m. at Main Street businesses.

The Kent County Sheriff Traffic Squad will hand out hot chocolate and donuts at the Cedar Springs firebarn at W. Maple and Second St. again this year, and the Cedar Springs Historical Museum will host a haunted school house at the museum in Morley Park. Calvary Assembly of God will host a carnival at Main and Ash, and The Springs Church will host Trunk-or-Treat from 6pm-8pm, in their parking lot at the corner of Maple and First Street, along with a giant slide, and refreshments. For more info, see ad below.

N-CSHalloweenSpooktacular

 

 

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Post travels to Washington

N-Post-travels-to-Washington-DavisThe Post traveled to Taholah, Washington, on an Amtrak train in July, with Dick and Hattie Davis, of Algoma Twp. They visited with Dick’s sister, Marian Davis Curley, who graduated from Cedar Springs High School in 1959, and after graduating from Trinity College in Chicago, in 1964, went on to teach elementary school in Taholah.

Taholah is the administrative village of the Quinault Indian Nation, where the Quinault River empties into the Pacific Ocean, in the Olympic Peninsula.

Dick and Hattie enjoyed visiting Marian, her husband of 48 years, and four generations of the Curley family.

Thanks, Dick and Hattie, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

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Medical cause suspected in M-57 crash into home

The driver who crashed into this home on 14 Mile Road Monday may have suffered a medical emergency. Photo courtesy of the Rockford Squire.

The driver who crashed into this home on 14 Mile Road Monday may have suffered a medical emergency. Photo courtesy of the Rockford Squire.

A resident in the home located on the southwest corner of Myers Lake Road and 14 Mile Road (M-57) heard two crashing sounds before a final one shook the house. She found that a Jeep Patriot had left the road, gone down and up a hilled area, taken out a road sign, and narrowly missed a large pear tree before striking her home, at 7156 14 Mile Road, just before 12:23 p.m. on Monday, October 20.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, the driver may have suffered a medical emergency. They reported that a witness said that the driver, identified as Bruce Wayne Beck, 69, of Gowen, was slumped over the wheel as he entered the intersection, and never tapped his brakes or made any attempt to slow down before hitting the home.

First responders to the scene worked on the driver, the sole inhabitant of the vehicle, for nearly an hour before transporting him to a downtown Grand Rapids hospital with a life-threatening medical condition. After removing the driver from the vehicle, they performed chest compressions in attempts to stabilize him before transportation via Rockford Ambulance.

Responding to the scene was Courtland Fire and Rescue, the Kent County Sheriff Department and Rockford Ambulance.

The resident of the home said she didn’t immediately realize what had happened, but noted that there are numerous accidents at the intersection. No one in the home was injured.

 

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