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Archive | August, 2018

Everybody is doing something

 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Katydids did. Crickets chirp, Chickadees dee dee, doves coo, squirrels chatter, chipmunks cluck, butterflies flash color, bees probe flowers, aphids cluster, ants carry things, moles tunnel, fish splash, and snakes sun. 

We look for excuses to be outside. My skateboarding days are over. Climbing the big pine outback is a memory of days past but I saw a porcupine choose to climb the white pine I once scaled to the top. The prickly mammal was trying to catch some daytime sleep near the trunk but crows objected and announced his presence. 

Every creature is doing something. This year’s fourth generation of Harvester butterflies appeared in mid-August. I thought there were only two generations each year. After adults’ mate and lay eggs, caterpillars hatch to feed on clustered wooly aphids. When grown, they pupate to transform into gorgeous winged insects. 

Each species seeks special nature niche locations to spend days and nights. In a location we refer to as the woodcock circle, the Harvester searches for mates and chases intruders. This past week, one rapidly flew back and forth near sunlit branches. Soon a second arrived and the two tumbled through the air before separating. I wondered if they were two males hoping to chase the other away or if one was female and they would mate. 

One left and the other landed on a leaf where I could observe it had recently emerged from a chrysalis. Bright white circles were on shades of tan and brown wings giving evidence for its newness to the air. After days on the wing, its pattern dulls as it busies itself “doing something.” During its brief adulthood, I take pleasure watching its erratic flight. Without great effort on my part, the caterpillar remains unseen. It spends its childhood camouflaged among wooly aphids on speckled alder. It is hidden from me and the aphids it eats.

A downy woodpecker has taken a fancy to the hummingbird sugar water feeder. The hummers seem to have left the yard after nesting was complete. Where they went to “do something” is unknown. 

Katydids are beginning to tune their wing instrument as they strum their lower and upper wings together but they wait for the privacy of darkness to begin tuning up. These grasshoppers blend well in field vegetation during the day. Unlike butterflies and other insects with straw-like mouth parts, they have chewing mandibles like beetles. They feed on plants. Many beetles are busy seeking insects on plants or in the ground to chew. 

Much of an individual’s life is spent eating a specialized food choice. Food preparation is important. Mud dauber wasps build tubes of mud under overhangs where they will stash a spider paralyzed with a sting. An egg will be laid on the paralyzed meal that the adult will never eat. It is the young that will hatch to feed on the immobile spider in the dark protection of the mud tube.

Most mammals work the night shift. We seldom see their activities. After a day’s rest, they become active in the crepuscular hours of dusk or linger into the dawn. Squirrels and chipmunks choose daylight to scurry through the neighborhood. 

It is always rewarding to canoe or kayak a stream to encounter a multitude of active animals. Belted kingfishers take pause from hunting minnows and small fish when we drift into their hunting grounds. They keep moving downstream ahead of us instead of immediately flying overhead to an upstream location. 

On rare occasions, we see one capture food. Food preparation is a big event. They tenderize fish to eat. I have watched one land on a branch with its minnow and proceed to beat it against the branch for 10 or 15 minutes before swallowing it. 

Any creature encountered will entertain us while “doing something.” Enjoy observing something new each time you “do the something” of watching amazing activities in nature.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Fishing Tip: Catching big pike in the summer

 

Most anglers consider winter the best time to catch a trophy-sized pike, but following a few key pointers can make summer pike fishing worthwhile.

When it’s very warm out think about where pike will hide places with cooler water. These spots include along the thermocline, where coldwater streams/rivers flow into lakes, or around springs.

Look for water bodies that aren’t densely populated with pike so those present may have a chance to grow fairly large. Also consider locations that have special regulations (size limits).

Lastly, focus on water bodies that have a good pike forage base, particularly other species that prefer cooler water.

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The bus stop

 

Two old men were sitting on a bench waiting for their bus. The buses were running late, and a lot of time passed. Finally, one man turned to the other and said, “You know, I’ve been sitting here so long, my butt fell asleep!”

The other man looked at him and said, “I know. I heard it snoring!”

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Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.


God’s Kitchen in Cedar Springs

Sept. 4,11,18,25: Join us for dinner every Tuesday. God’s Kitchen – Cedar Springs welcomes families from Northern Kent County and the surrounding area to a Tuesday Evening Meal. No charge – no registration required!  Served from 5:30 – 6:30 pm at the St. John Paul II Parish, 3110 – 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs. For more information, call the Church office at 616-696-3904. #35

Community Health Class – Bullying

Sept. 5: Wednesday, September 5, 2-3pm – Metron and the Cedar Springs Library partner to bring you a monthly series of Community Health classes. This month features “Bullying.” Bullying happens beyond the school yard. Professionals explore the topic broadly and offer resources and avenues to address this challenge. #35

Chicken BBQ and Rummage Sale

Sept. 7,8: Courtland Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake Rd., Rockford, is having their annual Chicken BBQ, Rummage and Bake Sale. The rummage and bake sale is Friday, September 7th from 9 am to 4 pm, Saturday, September 8th, from 9 am to 7 pm. BBQ Chicken will be available on Saturday, September 8th from 4 to 7 pm. Half chicken and fixin’s, dine in or carry out. $10.00. Funds raised will go to national and international missions. #35,36b

BUNCO at Rockford Masonic Lodge

Sept. 7: BUNCO!!! – Join us Friday, September 7th at 6:00 P.M. at the Rockford Masonic Lodge, 1430 Northland Drive (near 12 Mile Rd).  Bring a snack to share and $5 to play.  Prizes, 50-50 drawing, friends and fun.  We collect boxed and canned food items for the local food pantry.  Games will be held the first Friday of the month through the year.  Sponsored by the Rockford Chapter of Eastern Star. #35

AWANA Starts at Huggard Bible

Sept. 12: Calling all Awana Clubbers from ages 3 years old to 6th grade! Awana Clubs (Cubbies & Sparks) T.N.T. starts on September 12th from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. Because to God kids matter! Huggard Bible Church, 8860 – 21 Mile Rd., Sand Lake, 616-636-5561. #35,36b

Red Pine Run at HCNC

Oct. 13: Walk or run our cross-country style 5K or 2.5K with the best scenery in West Michigan! Everyone registered by October 5th will receive a free T-shirt. Refreshments provided post-race. Door prizes. Saturday, October 13th at 2 pm. $25 nonmembers/ $20 members. Create a team of 4 people and receive $3 off per entry. HCNC is dog friendly so bring your 4-legged friend to run with you. Register online or by calling the office. Staff will contact you for T-shirt information. Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16190 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, 616-675-3158, www.howardchristensen.org. #35

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It’s time for football!

Red Hawk Ryan Ringler leaps over several Pioneers as he scores a touchdown against East Grand Rapids in 2017.

Michigan high school football starts this week, and fans are looking forward to a great season for the hometown team in the OK-White. In 2017, the Red Hawks went 7-4, which included some exciting moments, such as 28-14 win over Lowell during the regular season, and a heart-stopping victory over East Grand Rapids 41-40 in a pre-district game. Cedar Springs will have two non-conference games before Labor Day that will test their mettle. The first is tonight, Thursday, August 23, at Saginaw Swan Valley. They went 12-2 last year, losing to West Catholic in the Division 5 state final. Then next Thursday, August 30, the Red Hawks will host Caledonia, who went 4-5 last year in a tough division—the OK-Red. Watch for a complete schedule in an upcoming issue. Come on out and cheer your Red Hawks! Hope to see you there!

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Catholic parish breaks ground on new, larger church

Saint John Paul II Parish broke ground on a new church last Sunday. Photo by Sue Wolfe.

 

By Sue Wolfe

A Rite of Beginning Work on the Building of a Church (commonly known as a groundbreaking) was held on Sunday, August 19 following the 10:30 a.m. mass for a new Catholic church to be built near the existing Saint John Paul II Parish located at 3110 17 Mile Road, Cedar Springs, just west of Meijer. 

The Most Reverend David J. Walkowiak, Bishop of the Diocese of Grand Rapids, presided over this historic event in the presence of the parish’s first pastor Father Lam T. Le and many joyful parishioners.   

“It is an exciting moment when a bishop has the opportunity to break ground on a new church in his diocese,” said Bishop Walkowiak. “This growth shows the vibrancy of the Catholic faith in West Michigan.”

Since opening in 2013, the community’s first Catholic Church has done extensive remodeling of the sanctuary and added a commercial kitchen, classrooms, offices, storage area, and a large gathering room/dining area. The current church will remain as a holy chapel for weddings, funerals, and daily mass. The adjoining facilities will continue to be utilized for faith formation and an outreach center of the parish.

The Bishop cited the good works and powerful ministry being done through this small community church to include a free Tuesday night meal serving an average 70 people per night. The parish has youth ministries, faith formation programs, and outreach programs, as well as collaborating with other community Christian groups and organizations to address needs within the area schools and community. 

Following the opening words of Bishop Walkowiak, he then sprinkled holy water over the boundary lines of the proposed church and a corner piece of the foundation. Approximately 300 parishioners and guests attended the ceremony followed by a feast in the gathering room where they shared stories of celebration and hope. 

“Over the past five years, I have witnessed how God has been working through the faith community in Cedar Springs,” said Reverend Lam Le, pastor of St. John Paul II Parish. “I have seen a great number of people coming to this parish for the sacraments of Christian initiation. I have also observed families who have joined our parish and joyfully offered their stewardship of time, talent and treasure to the Lord. Truly, St. John Paul II Parish is living its mission of being the hands and feet of Christ.”

Construction of the new church began on Monday, August 20 and is scheduled to conclude in November 2019. The parish expects to have 600 families by the end of 2018. Church leaders believe their ability to grow is dependent on the space they have available. The rectory will wait until after the church is complete.

Saint John Paul II Parish welcomes all those who wish to explore and deepen their faith to include those who may have practiced the Catholic faith in the past, are currently practicing Catholicism, and those who may want to explore and learn what the Catholic faith involves. The office is open Tuesday–Thursday 9–4, and Fridays 9–noon.  Weekday Mass times are Tuesdays, Wednesday, and Thursdays at noon. Sunday Masses are: Vigil at 4 p.m. (on Saturday), on Sunday 8:30 and 10:30 am and 5 pm. You can call 616-696-3904 or visit the website www.JP2-MQA.org for more information. 

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Woman injured in crash

A Cedar Springs woman was critically injured last Thursday when her vehicle was hit from behind by another vehicle.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, the crash occurred on Thursday, August 16, about 6:47 p.m. in the 15000 block of Algoma Avenue, in Solon Township.

The investigation showed that a 2003 Oldsmobile Bravada, driven by Cynthia DeLoof, 42, of Newaygo, was traveling northbound on Algoma when her vehicle collided with a 2008 Chrysler 300, also traveling northbound. Witnesses reported that the Chrysler, driven by Lila DeLine, 36, of Cedar Springs, had slowed or stopped on the roadway preparing to turn and was rear-ended by the at fault vehicle.

The driver of the Chrysler was transported by ambulance to the hospital in critical condition. The driver of the at-fault vehicle refused medical treatment at the scene. Alcohol was not a factor in the accident. 

The Kent County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by Solon Township Fire Department and Rockford Ambulance.

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Donations rescue youth football program

Vanderhyde Ford presented a $9,000 check to the Cedar Springs Youth Football League. From left to right are CSYFL board members Jason Bravata, Eric Prins, April Victorson, Shawn Kiphart; Vanderhyde Ford reps Keith Waligora and John Williamson; and CSYFL board member Amy Gillette. Photo courtesy CSYFL.

By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs Youth Football (CSYFL) program is back in the black thanks to donations from the community.

Board members found earlier this year that about $12,000 was missing from their account due to an embezzlement, and that not only would they not be able to buy the kids the new jerseys they had saved for, but they were also in debt for last year’s equipment. As soon as word got out, the community stepped in and began to donate individually and through fundraisers. And one Cedar Springs business—Vanderhyde Ford—ran ads in the paper stating that they would donate $100 for every vehicle sold. They made a sizable donation to the group a few weeks ago that gave the program a real shot in the arm—$9,000.

The CSYFL board wants everyone to know how well they are doing and how grateful they are for the support. “On behalf of the CSYFL Board, we’d like to extend a thank you to the community for all of the generous donations that we have received,” they told the Post. “These donations enabled us to start moving in a positive direction by paying off debts and making improvements to our facility. We’d especially like to thank Vanderhyde Ford for their amazing donation of $9,000. With their donation we were able to follow through with our promise to purchase new jerseys for our children and pay off the remaining debt.”  

The group had a successful flag football season and is looking forward to the Rocket football season, which begins this week with practices. The first games will be Saturday, September 8. “With all of the support from our community, we are able to move forward in a positive light, and it will be an exciting season of Rocket Football for us all,” they said.

CSYFL board members include Eric Prins, President; April Victorson, Vice President; Amy Schoenborn, Secretary; Chrissy Simons, Treasurer; Shawn Kiphart, Field Director; Amy Gillette, Concessions & Spirit Wear Coordinator/Trustee; Jamie Oliver, Trustee; Kevin DeWeese, Trustee; Brad Austin, Trustee; Mike Nienhuis, Asst. Field Director; and Jason Bravata, Asst. Field Director.

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The Post travels to Finland

On July 26, the Post went on a Baltic Sea voyage with Virginia Engleman, of Sparta, and the Northview Seniors. “In Helsinki, Finland, I had my picture taken with the Post, and I had people asking me the location of Cedar Springs, Michigan,” she said.

Thanks for taking us with you, Virginia, and for making us famous!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Hometown Hero

 

U.S. Air Force Airman Joseph P. Sherman

U.S. Air Force Airman Joseph P. Sherman graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Sherman is the son of Robert and Lisetta Sherman of Cedar Springs, Mich. He is also the brother of Ashley Sherman.

Sherman is a 2015 graduate of Cedar Springs High School, Cedar Springs, Mich.

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