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Cloud jumping

 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Jumping from a plane into a puffy cumulus cloud was a sensation I wanted. My fear was how would I return to the ground. Would I be stuck forever drifting over the surface of Earth with no way home?

I was at age of discovery but do not recall my age. The story of Jack and he Bean Stalk most likely aroused my interest in cloud jumping. I wondered what was really in clouds? How could I discover nature niche secretes in those moving works of art without jumping into the cottony fluffs? 

Laying in the lawn, I watched clouds come and go. Each comprised uniquely shaped creatures and objects. One was a passing whale followed by an elephant, and then a dragon breathing fire. They weren’t all animals. An ice cream cone was leaning to its side. Warm sunshine caused the ice cream to vaporize and disappear. At some point, I would learn clouds were water droplets that condensed from a gas to liquid on a speck of dust. Later liquid water would evaporate again as the sun’s rays energized molecules back to an invisible gas. 

A smaller group of passing clouds comprised of three birds with wings outstretched were making their way toward a larger cloud that must have been a tree canopy where they could take shelter and find rest. They were not gaining on the tree as they flew. Their wing feathers were vaporizing and disintegrated before my eyes. Each of the cloud birds disappeared one by one and never reached the shelter they sought. 

If I jumped into a cloud, I feared not being able to get back to the Earth’s surface. Had I managed to actually jump into a cloud, I would have discovered too late that I would pass through quickly and end my journey as a splat on terra ferma. I would vanish as surely as the three vaporizing birds.

Using imagination to ponder the world while lying flat ones back develops a healthy mind. Our girls and I discussed creatures overhead. They would point out bears, penguins, houses, clumps of grapes, smiling faces, and dogs. Summer days on family vacations included skipping stones on still water lake surfaces, paddling a canoe across a lake to “turtle bay” where turtles quietly slid off logs, and watching the passing cloud parade.

Peace away from the hustle of life at home allowed us to become an element of nature. We replenished our spirits and souls. Wonderment surrounded us. Later in life, the nature of clouds would be transformed from imaginary creatures to water droplets and our fascination could dangerously evaporate like the three birds. 

The enchantment of drifting clouds from my childhood has not vanished like vaporizing clouds before my eyes. Time with my kids allowed me to relive the passing parade many times over on vacations or on day outings. The girls have grown, moved away and begun families. They can relax and enjoy cloud discovery with their spouses and kids. New clouds and creatures arrive to greet every new generation. Don’t miss them.

Cloud creatures still enrapture my solitude adventures to wilderness locations where time stands still and my mind peacefully wanders. Despite an aging body, my consciousness retains the excitement revealed early in life. We all get lost among responsibilities of everyday demands. Time away from the routine of human-centered activities and technological inventions allows us opportunity to develop a real-world relationship.

I learned stratus clouds quietly drop rain for hours, high cirrus clouds are icy, and noisy cumulus thunderheads startle us with loud claps after jagged bolts of lightning cut the sky wide open. Understanding the science of clouds is important for a number reasons. One of those reasons is so we do not jump into them thinking we will get to explore a hidden world only to discover it will be our last living experience. 

Savor the parading creatures. Take time to recline in wilderness areas alone, with family members or friends. Let your mind drift with the clouds. Rejuvenate your soul and spirit. It happens naturally in wild places away from the distractions imposed by daily demands. The values of wilderness are immense. 

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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