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Monarch champion and icon dies

 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

Lincoln Brower, who was considered one of the foremost experts on the iconic monarch butterfly and a scientist who advocated for protection for the declining species, died on July 17 at his home in Roseland, Virginia at age 86, with complications from Parkinson’s disease. He was a key researcher demonstrating that blue jays become ill eating monarchs and learned birds avoid eating them. His research helped build scientific evidence supporting that birds learn to avoid toxic insects in their diet. The orange color is a warning “don’t eat me.” 

Through scholarly papers, articles, and interviews, Dr. Brower illuminated the story of the monarch. Working with groups in Mexico and with the Mexican government in the 1980s, he helped establish sanctuaries to protect crucial fir forests from logging where the butterflies gather in the millions. In later years he said illegal cutting continued. I recall discussing the plight of monarch migration phenomena with him. 

He stated the monarch species has non-migratory populations that live in sedentary populations in the Caribbean islands, Trinidad, Bermuda and South America. Those are not likely to go extinct. Most of the Northern American population gathers in Mexico by the millions for a two-way multiple generation migration unique in the world. He said that would likely disappear in the early 21st century. Fortunately, that has not occurred. In part, the migratory population might still exist because of his tireless efforts to protect it. 

Biodiversity that supports humans and other life on Earth is disappearing piece by piece. Dr. Dave Warners recently stated we are losing 50,000 species worldwide annually. I have seen habitat sampling evidence that supports higher and lower estimates. We do not know the long-term impacts this will have on humans or ecosystems that support us. Lincoln focused research on monarchs but he held a broader view for protecting biodiversity essential for our species’ economic, social, and environmental health.

I write about such things in my nature niche column. They are not my original ideas. Most were generated in previous centuries with additional scientific evidence support being added in recent decades. Dr. Brower was a scientist whose work and evidence helped protect human interests. I hope voters consider the importance of scientific evidence and do not dismiss it because it does not agree with their desires. Most scientists are unwilling to voice political advocacy when their work is referred to as fake news. Lincoln used scientific evidence to advocate protection for the monarch. He said, “We’re too pragmatic in this country, and I think we need to realize that biological treasures such as the monarch are just as valuable as the Mona Lisa.” 

Brower charted the butterflies’ stark decline. Its overall population has fallen by about 80 percent over the last two decades, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. In 2014, Brower placed his name alongside conservation groups to petition the federal government to protect the monarch under the Endangered Species Act. “He was the only scientist who joined the petition–it’s a gigantic deal,” said Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity. “A lot of scientists shy away from advocacy.” The Endangered Species, Clean Water, Clean Air, and Wilderness Acts are under grave threat by the Trump administration. I encourage readers to voice their opinions to Congressional representatives now. 

Dr. Brower recognized many people relate to human created treasures. Many species comprising Earth’s diversity are not equally valued and are considered expendable. Regarding protection of endangered species, Congress is not protecting the value of Grand Staircase National Monument in Utah where protections were removed by Executive Order last year. By who voters elected, we support the unlawful taking of private property along the Mexican border without due process. I am part owner of North American Butterfly Association property there where the Endangered Species Act has been exempted as a matter of national security. Dr. Brower objected to such taking and recognized personal rights and environmental protection are essential to national security and sustainability. 

I am honored to have known Lincoln and to have been mentored by him personally and through his published works. “Google” Lincoln Brower to discover the authors I used to cull information shared and to read details about his amazing life. Sadly, we have lost a monarch champion and icon. Will you champion monarchs? 

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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