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Archive | July, 2018

Jesus is praying for you

Pastor Mike Shiery

Pilgrim bible church

West Pine Street • Cedar Springs

 

“And the Lord said, ‘Simon, Simon! Indeed, Satan has asked for you, that he may sift you as wheat. 

But I have prayed for you, that your faith should not fail; and when you have returned to Me, strengthen your brethren.’” (Luke 22:31-32) (NKJV)

It was a somber moment. Jesus and His disciples had been celebrating the Jewish Passover with a meal that we now commonly call “The Last Supper.” Most of the men gathered there that night did not fully comprehend the momentous events which were soon to follow. Jesus would be betrayed, arrested, tortured, and executed. Those dark moments of seeming disaster would be followed by one of the most glorious days in all of human history, the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. 

Against that background, Jesus took the time to specifically speak into the life of one of His best and most flawed followers. He knew that in the next few hours, Peter would deny and forsake Him, cursing and turning His back on the Man he had traveled with and worked with for the last three years. 

Peter was bold, braggadocious, zealous, hardworking, loving, impetuous, and inherently flawed. At the core of his nature was a shameful hidden secret. Beneath all his bragging and bluster, Peter had a cowardly streak. The man who once vowed to die for Jesus would in reality deny his best friend in order to save his own skin.

Knowing all of this, it is heartening to see that Jesus did not lash out in anger and revenge. Instead He spoke words of encouragement and love to Peter. Jesus knew that after the passion of the moment passed, Peter would be eaten alive with remorse and sorrow. So Jesus basically told Peter that when he was feeling most alone and worthless (as a result of his own stupid decisions), to remember that Jesus had prayed for him and would be willing to restore him.

It would do us well to remember that when we have failed and see only a trail of disaster behind us, that Jesus still loves us and is praying for us. He is the God of mercy and desires to bring restoration to your life. When the world looks at you and says, “It’s over,” God looks at you and says, “I’m not done with you!” No matter how dark your circumstances, remember that with God working in your life, there is always hope! Never resist His love.

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MARY JEAN HALL

Mary Jean Hall (formerly Mary Jean Scholten), Sand Lake, Michigan, age 69, passed away on July 14, 2018 into the loving arms of her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ with her family by her side. Mary Jean was born June 17, 1949 in Grand Haven. She was an active member of Pierson Bible Church. Mary Jean will be remembered for her zeal for Christ as she shared the good news on many mission trips, her love for the outdoors and gardening, and the joy she brought as she served others. On June 16, 1990, she married Danny Hall. Her husband of 28 years survives, as do her children, Shawnda (Dan) Brewer of Holland, Brent Scholten of Zeeland, Chad (Michelle) Scholten of West Olive; step son, Christopher (Carinn) Hall of Comstock Park; grandchildren, Bethany, Andrew, Ashley, Rebecca, Connor, Kyleigh, Trista, Hunter, Michaela, Dani, Leo; two great-grandchildren; and uncle, Roger & Rose Bush of Holland. Mary Jean was preceded in death by her parents, Wallace and Sarah (Bush) De Zwaan; and her son in law, Paul Hutt. A funeral service will be held on Friday, July 20 at 11 a.m. at Pierson Bible Church, 101 Grand St. Pierson, Michigan. Friends may visit with family on Thursday from 6-8:30 p.m. at Heritage Life Story Funeral Home, 2120 Lake Michigan Drive NW and at the church from 10-11 a.m. Memorials may be made to Equest Center For Therapeutic Riding, Inc. Please visit Mary Jean’s personal web page to read more of her life story, leave a message or condolence at www.lifestorynet.com.

Arrangements by Heritage Life Story Funeral Home, Grand Rapids

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JOANN J. JOHNSON

JoAnn J. Johnson, age 73, of Sand Lake, died Thursday, July 12, 2018 at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit. JoAnn was born June 29, 1945 in Wexford County, Michigan the daughter of Charles and Lillian (Rosenberry) Cass. She loved her church, The Springs Church in Cedar Springs where she was an active member. She enjoyed her grandkids and great-grandkids and always put others ahead of herself. Surviving are her children, Jackie Lee (Yvette) Johnson, Jr, Christina (Larry) Housler, Douglas (Shari) Johnson, Teresa (Matt) Johnson, Keith (Shawn) Johnson; many grandchildren, great and great-great-grandchildren; brothers, Don (Jan) Cass, Louis Cass; sister, Ellen Mills. She was preceded in death by her former husband, Jackie Lee Johnson Sr. and brothers, Charles and James Cass. The family greeted friends Tuesday, July 17 at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The service was Wednesday, July 18 at The Springs Church, 135 N. Grant St, Cedar Springs. Pastor Chris Anton officiating. Interment East Nelson Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to The Springs Church.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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JOSEPHINE (COOPER) SMITH

Josephine “Jo” (Cooper) Smith passed away in Harrisville, Michigan, at the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Pamela and Dale Dellar, on July 2, 2018. Prior to moving to Harrisville, approximately a year ago, she resided in the Cedar Springs area nearly all of her life. Jo was born August 28, 1926 in Harvard, Michigan. She was the daughter of Walter Cooper and Anna (Mersnick) Atkins. In 1944 she graduated from Cedar Springs High School, having worked as a housekeeper/nanny while attending there as a student. Jo married Alan P. Smith of Stanton, Michigan, on May 11, 1946, and enjoyed nearly 35 years of marriage until Alan’s death in 1980.
Following graduation, she worked at Consumers Power Company in Greenville, Michigan. She left her work when the first of her four children was born. She returned to work, “outside her home,” in 1967, for Holton’s LP Gas Company in Cedar Springs. She started as a clerk and was later promoted to office manager. She retired from full-time work in 1992, but continued to work part-time. Following her retirement, Jo renewed her interest in dancing. She developed many friendships while attending dances in Sparta, Trufant, Six Lakes, Conklin, Parnell, and anywhere that was convenient for her to drive.
Jo had a passion for cooking and loved baking pies and homemade rolls. For years her family enjoyed her Sunday dinners, which would usually include her famous green salad. This family tradition continued well into her 80s, only ending when she was no longer able to cook. Family was the most important thing in her life.
Josephine was preceded in death by her husband, Alan; father, Walter; mother, Anna; and dear sister, Kathleen Bitely.
She will always be lovingly remembered by her surviving son, Larry Smith of Cedar Springs; daughters Linda (John) Ranney of Grand Rapids; Pamela (Dale) Dellar of Harrisville, Michigan; Sue (Kurt) Mabie of Cedar Springs; grandchildren, Ryan (Koree) Mabie of Grand Rapids; Kelly Jo (Jason) Horricks of Mackinac Island; Kristy (Calvin) Gibson of Manistee; Michael Mabie (& Tina Van) of Grand Rapids; and Kevin Newland (& Laura Herweyer) of Minneapolis; great-grandchildren, Makenna & Megan Horricks; Michael Davis; and Emerson & Failla Mabie. Surviving siblings include Donna Atkins; Gary (Maxine) Cooper; Frances Cooper; and Leon (Barb) Atkins. Also surviving are several nieces and nephews. A special thank you to Barb (Robinson) Garvon for her devotion to and loving care provided to our Mother.
A Celebration of Life service will be held on Thursday, July 26th, at 1 p.m. at Spencer Township Hall, located at 14960 Meddler Ave., Gowen, Michigan, with Pastor Julie Schneider-Thomas officiating. A luncheon will be served following the service.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in Jo’s memory be made to Hospice of Michigan-Alpena, 145 N. State Ave., Alpena, Michigan or to a charity of one’s choice.

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Sand Lake council member resigns

 

Dear Council,

My intention was to serve as a trustee until the election in November when my appointed term ends. When I was sworn in, I took my oath to the constitution and the people of the village very seriously and was prepared to face the typical civil discourse that occurs during the work of such an organization. I was excited about serving in the community and immediately began the work of community engagement, hopeful that working together would bring growth, progress and prosperity to our village.

Since then, however, the typical civil discourse has turned toxic and disruptive to the operations of the village and its people. After Monday’s village council meeting, it was very clear to me that most of the village council members do not share the same sense of integrity and values that I do. I am no longer willing to serve next to people who engage in unprofessional, unethical, immoral, and even potentially criminal behaviors.

I am no longer confident that the majority of the council is committed to good governance. The severe breakdown in trust between council members along with the outrageous conduct of some members at meetings has prompted my resignation. Consider this email notification of my resignation from the Sand Lake Village Council.

Janice L. Dewey, Village of Sand Lake 

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What the pledge means

 

By Lee Hamilton

You know the Pledge of Allegiance, probably by heart. You may recite it only occasionally, or get the chance several times a week. Sometimes, I’m guessing, you say it mechanically, and other times filled with deep meaning.

I hope it’s more often the latter, because here’s what’s remarkable about the Pledge: in a few short phrases, it lays out the fundamentals of what our country represents and strives to achieve.

Let’s start with these words: “and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible.” It’s not just talking about any nation or form of government; it’s talking about a republic — a unified nation, under divine Providence, with three fully equal branches that are strong, independent, and each entrusted with limited and defined powers within their constitutional boundaries.

The meaning goes even deeper than that. Really, we’re talking about power being dispersed across a large number of people and institutions. We’re talking about a system that was designed by people who were so wary of concentrated power that they made it difficult for any one person or institution to wield it.

They created a republic that to its core rejects autocratic political leadership and authoritarianism. It sees them as a threat to our democracy, and depends upon a system of elections in which ballots are counted fairly and citizens have equal voting rights.

This, in turn, provides a system that has the capacity to reform and renew itself, because its institutions rest on the political involvement of our citizens. Elected representatives make the laws, but government is bound by the electoral process, an independent judiciary, and constitutional guarantees of freedom of speech, assembly, religion and the press.

This brings us to the final words: “with liberty and justice for all.” These are crucial to understand. They represent what some pundits have called a framework of decency: a system built on individual dignity and respect for each person. This is a monumental achievement — a country that seeks liberty and justice for all within its borders, and often beyond them, with no limitations or caveats. Liberty and justice are not reserved for white males, or even for citizens only.

In all this, we recognize and tolerate our differences. We may not always measure up to our ideals, but we certainly know what they are. We expect differences in race, religion, and political beliefs. We don’t try to demonize those who are different.

At heart, then, this is a system based on a core belief that we’re all in this enterprise together, and all connected to one another. Everyone has the right to enjoy the promise of America.

Put these two parts of the Pledge together, and what it’s telling us is that we live in a system that binds us together by adherence to rules of political engagement, respect for the rule of law, and belief in our democratic institutions.

We may disagree about all kinds of issues, but we firmly believe in equal political rights and equal opportunity. “Liberty and justice for all” means giving individuals the space to make choices in their own lives that will enable them to flourish. What the country expects in return is that most individuals will live a life of honor, excellence and responsibility. The system demands hard work on the part of its citizens if it is to succeed.
So the next time you stand as the Pledge is recited, think about what you’re saying. It’s deceptively simple. But it packs a powerful message.

Lee Hamilton is a Senior Advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

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Culver’s opens for business

Tom Goldsmith cuts the ribbon. Photo courtesy of video supplied by Gary Kuhlmann.

Residents in Cedar Springs will have another option to choose from now when dining out.

Culver’s, a fast food restaurant specializing in butter burgers and frozen custard, had their grand opening and ribbon cutting Monday morning, July 16, at 9 a.m. Owner Tom Goldsmith gave a short speech before cutting the ribbon, and then the workers gave out free custard to the many people on hand for the event.

Culver’s is located on White Creek Avenue, just south of 17 Mile.

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Larry’s Tire, Inc. to invest in new facility 

A regional tire reseller is consolidating its area locations into a new 68,000 SF facility in Howard City.

The Right Place, Inc.<https://www.rightplace.org/> and the Montcalm Economic Alliance<https://www.rightplace.org/for-local-business/montcalm-county> (MEA) announced that the organization recently completed an economic development project with locally-owned Larry’s Tire, Inc.  Larry’s Tire, Inc. recently purchased the former Universal Products, Inc. building on 19342 Lake Montcalm Road in Howard City. The company intends to consolidate its three operations in the surrounding area into one location. The 68,500 square foot building had remained vacant for several years. Larry’s Tire plans to make significant investments in building upgrades. The consolidation will retain 30 jobs, with a potential of 30 possible new in the future as the business continues to grow and diversify.  “We were close to making an offer on a location outside Montcalm County,” said Larry Cole, Owner, Larry’s Tire, Inc. “But, representatives from The Right Place intervened after receiving a call from Isabella Bank. This location fits perfectly into our model, offers us plenty of room to consolidate all three businesses, and provides room to grow.”  

Larry’s Tire resells and recycles tires from major consumer retail stores throughout Michigan. Tires that can’t be resold are shredded and taken to the Pierson Landfill as filler. Additional tire shredding for landscaping, playgrounds and other uses may provide future growth areas for the business. “While the new business attraction projects get a lot of press, the retention and organic growth of local businesses provides great satisfaction,” said Kathy Jo VanderLaan, Business Development for The Right Place in Montcalm County. “Filling this large building in Howard City with such a business is the icing on the cake!”  

For more information, visit: http://www.rightplace.org/for-local-business/montcalm-county  

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Positive attitudes generate positive results

 

SCORE, Counselors to America’s Small Business

Free Business Counseling

 

Everybody has a bad day at work at least now and then. If you’re not careful, those bad days can become the norm rather than the exception for your small business. Without a positive attitude among everyone involved with your business (including yourself), a business suffers in tangible and intangible ways. Employees with poor attitudes affect customers negatively, discourage other workers from doing their best, and fail to perform to their own level of capability. Customers can sense when the person helping them is indifferent about their work, and they may wonder if it extends through the entire company.

When examining employee attitudes, start with your own. Be genuinely interested in the other people you work with-not only employees but also customers and suppliers. Respect your employees’ dignity. Let them know that they are important to your and your business and that high performance will be rewarded. Help employees identify realistic approaches to making them feel fulfilled by their jobs. While you want to be sensitive to the emotions of employees, do not ignore poor performance.  When an employee does not perform up to standards or has made a mistake, meet with him or her in private to discuss the issue.

Include your employees as team members. Ask for their suggestions and respect their ideas-even if you do not always agree with them. When you implement an idea contributed by an employee, remember to give the employee credit. This practice helps all employees see their value to the company the way you see it.

Allow employees input into the business operation when you can reasonably do so. For example, if your small business were to conduct an employee survey, would you then be willing to respond by making changes in the business? If left unaddressed, the problem areas that surface within companies and can lead to employee dissent and hinder productivity in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

If you would like to discuss employee surveys and team-building, contact SCORE “Counselors to America’s Small Business.” SCORE is a nonprofit organization of volunteer counselors providing free, confidential advice to entrepreneurs. For the Grand Rapids SCORE chapter, call 1-616/771-0305, or find a counselor online at www.scoregrandrapids.org.

These ASK SCORE articles are submitted by the Grand Rapids Chapter of SCORE where there are 35 SCORE counselors ready to serve you and your business needs. To reach the Grand Rapids office call 1-616/771-0305, or find a counselor online at www.scoregrandrapids.org.

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A mama and her babies

Ed Bremmer, of Cedar Springs, dropped off this beautiful photo of a doe and her twin fawns. He said it was taken on the west side of Cedar Springs.

Thank you so much, Ed, for sharing it with us!

Do you have a wildlife or wildflower photo you’d like to share? Send it to news@cedarspringspost.com.

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