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Archive | December, 2017

BRISON CHRISTOPHER RICKER

Brison Christopher Ricker of Cedar Springs, Michigan, age 16, passed away on the morning of Saturday, December 23, 2017, after a brave & courageous battle with DIPG brain cancer. He was surrounded by his family in the comfort of his home, and rests now, comfortably in the arms of his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Born on January 4, 2001, Brison grew up in Cedar Springs and attended Cedar Springs High School. He was outgoing and driven by his faith in everything he did—always striving for greatness. Brison raced motocross, and played soccer and basketball. He loved watching sports too. Brison had a great sense of humor and a kind heart to match. He was an incredible and loving son, wonderful brother and best friend, grandson and teammate, and was loved by so many. Brison leaves behind his parents Brian and Kimberly (Morris) Ricker; brother Preston Ricker; grandparents Kathryn (Gary Burger) Ricker, Joe (Gail) Ricker; Mark Sheldon; uncle Mark Ricker; and many special friends. He was preceded in death by his grandmother Deb Sheldon. The funeral service for Brison will be celebrated by Pastors Julian Newman and Dawn Damon at 12:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 30, 2017, at Resurrection Life Church, 3233 10 Mile Road NE, Rockford, MI 49341. Relatives and friends may call on the family during a time of visitation from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. at the church. Those wishing to offer an expression of sympathy are encouraged to make a memorial contribution to Brison’s family to assist them with funeral expenses. Brison will be laid to rest in Elmwood Cemetery, Cedar Springs, Michigan.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

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Scott L. Case

Scott L. Case of Cedar Springs, Michigan, age 58, passed away on Sunday, December 24, 2017. He was born to Ross and Vera (Towsley) Case on December 14, 1959, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Scott was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed spending time with his family. He understood the value of hard work and passed that on to his children. Scott is survived by his beloved wife of over 25 years Melissa M. (Lund) Case; loving children Scott Case Jr., Craig Lund, Colton (Sam Streeter) Case, and Caleb Case; granddaughter Ashlyn and siblings Ross, Corrine, Ron, and Mary. He was preceded in death by both parents and best friend Charlie Hyke. There will be a time of visitation from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. and from 6:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 28, 2017, at Pederson Funeral Home, 127 N. Monroe Street NE, Rockford, MI 49341. There will be a Praying of the Rosary following visitation at 7:30 p.m. The mass of Christian burial for Scott will be celebrated at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, December 29, 2017, at St. John Paul II Catholic Church, 3110 17 Mile Rd NE, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. Fr. Lam will be presiding. There will also be a one hour visitation prior to the service.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

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DOLORES MARIE SYMON

 

Dolores Marie Symon, 86, of Cedar Springs, Michigan passed away on Thursday, December 21, 2017. Dolores was born on July 18, 1931, in Flint, Michigan to Emanuel (Pudge) and Marie Arndt. Her husband of 64 years, is Burton Edward Symon, and their children are: Chuck and Liza Symon, Jim and (Carol) Nauta, David and Debbie Symon, Laurie (Symon) Eaton, Harry and (Karen) Williams, and Craig and (Mary) Meyer. She had 13 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Her favorite saying was “Be Nice.” Her children are planning a celebration of her life this coming spring at Chippewa Lake Michigan. 

According to the wishes of Dolores, arrangements have been entrusted to Simply Cremations in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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LAURA SMITH

 

Laura Smith age 87 of Sand Lake passed away December 22, 2017 at Spectrum Health Butterworth Campus. She was born May 6, 1930 in Courtland Township the daughter of Albert and Grace (Stewart) Becker.  During her working years she worked as a seamstress as well as working in a factory for several years. She enjoyed sewing, plastic canvas, crafts, camping, fishing, gardening and swinging on the swing in the front yard. Surviving are her children, Dan (Jane) Smith of Pierson, Margaret Merritt of Sand Lake, Sandra (Harold – Trez) McConnell of Sparta, Edward (Karin) Smith Jr. of Ohio, Randy (Roxie) Smith of Texas, John (Cheryl) Smith of Sand Lake, Lori (Scott) Wesche of Howard City; 16 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren; one sister, Martha Parker; one brother, Kenneth Becker; a sister-in-law Dorothy Briggs; several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Edward, and seven brothers and sisters. The family greeted friends on Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. and prior to services on Thursday. Funeral services will take place on Thursday at 11:00 a.m. at the Heckman Funeral Home in Howard City with Pastor Richard Nichols officiating with burial in the Pierson Cemetery. Luncheon at 12 noon to 2 pm at the Sand Lake VFW. In lieu of flowers gift donations can be made in Laura’s honor at Howard City Action Center, 132 E. Edgerton, Howard City, MI 49329.

Arrangements by Heckman Funeral Home, Howard City

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Milestones of Success

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Add adventure to your New Year’s resolutions 

There are countless benefits to using Michigan’s state parks, trails and waterways as your gym, such as burning calories while snowshoeing the many hundreds of miles of trails across the state.

with Shoe Year’s hikes and other outdoor fun

Reinvigorate yourself in 2018! Make an “adventure resolution” and commit to exploring Michigan’s great outdoors this year with a “Shoe Year’s” hike, cross-country skiing, fat-tire biking or the many other ways to relish winter. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources encourages residents to shift their plans for the coming year into high gear with a few ideas for inspired outdoor fun.

“For many, winter in Michigan is an undiscovered gem,” said Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “State parks and trails offer visitors a completely different experience in the winter, everything from peaceful hikes through snow-dusted campgrounds and candlelight cross-country skiing to black diamond downhill skiing with views of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula. A Michigan winter adventure should be on everyone’s list this season.”

Find an online calendar listing of Shoe Year’s hikes and First Day Hikes at michigan.gov/winterfun. Or explore Michigan’s parks, trails and waterways on your own at www.michigan.gov/stateparks.

The following Shoe Year’s guided hikes take place through the first week of January:

  • Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park (Ontonagon County) – Friday, Dec. 29 from 6 to 9 p.m.
  • Bay City Recreation Area (Bay County) – Sunday, Dec. 31 from 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Maybury State Park (Wayne County) – Sunday, Dec. 31 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Island Lake Recreation Area (Livingston County) – Monday, Jan. 1 from 1 *Yankee Springs Recreation Area (Barry County) – Monday, Jan. 1 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First Day Hike)
  • Straits State Park (Cheboygan County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Besser Natural Area (Alpena County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from noon to 3 p.m.
  • Ludington State Park (Mason County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Michigan is part of the nationwide First Day Hikes program, coordinated by the National Association of State Park Directors and inspired by the First Day Hikes that originated more than 25 years ago at the Blue Hills Reservation, a state park in Milton, Massachusetts. Last year, more than 62,000 people participated on guided hikes that covered more than 114,000 miles on 1,300 hikes across the country.

If guided hikes don’t work into your schedule, but you are looking for an adventure checklist, here are a few winter adventures suggested by Maia Turek, resource development specialist for the DNR:

  • Muskegon Winter Sports Complex – Even a novice adventurer will love the variety of adventure options at this state park destination. A luge, ice skating through the woods, sledding, skiing and even yurt yoga classes are all part of the experience. Visit msports.org.
  • Experience the lantern-lit or candlelight ski and snowshoe events—even if just once. They happen throughout the winter and around the state, so finding one that works for your schedule should be easy. Visit michigan.gov/dnrcalendar.
  • Fat tire biking on the Cadillac Pathway – This 11.3-mile groomed ski, hike and bike trail with six loops is marked and groomed for novice and intermediate cross-country skiers. Rent a fat-tire bike from area bike shops or use your own. Visit michigan.gov/dnrtrails.
  • Grab a fishing rod and take advantage of the first of two Free Fishing Weekends Feb. 17-18. Twice a year, residents and non-residents can enjoy two back-to-back days of fishing without a license. Visit michigan.gov/freefishing.
  • Visit Palms Book State Park in the Upper Peninsula and be amazed by Kitch-iti-kipi’s geothermal energy. Because the water is 45 degrees year-round, this stunning spring is a four-season destination. It’s also a great snowmobile stop. Visit michigan.gov/palmsbook.
  • Jump on the Iron Belle Trail, the longest designated state trail in the nation, and hike (or bicycle) your way between Belle Isle Park in Detroit and Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula. Experience exciting cities, explore pristine forests and visit charming towns all across the state. Visit michigan.gov/ironbelle.
  • Porcupine Mountains Ski Area – Downhill skiers and snowboarders will enjoy 15 groomed trails, four glade trails, the second-highest vertical drop in Michigan (or Wisconsin) and breathtaking views of Lake Superior. The ski area also offers a launching point for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Visit porkiesfun.com.

“Often, the term resolution for the new year seems daunting, but don’t let it overwhelm you,” said Turek. “From participating in a guided hike along the more than 12,500 miles of state-designated trails, cross-country skiing on groomed trails and snowshoeing along lantern-lit trails to experiencing the ice skating trail at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex, these destinations are home to unique and calorie-burning options for experiencing the outdoors in the coming year.”

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Lighthouse keeper program offers vacation and service opportunity

The Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program offers the opportunity for a free two-week stay in historic lighthouse keepers’ quarters while helping to promote the history and preservation of the site.

When the calendar reaches December, it’s not uncommon for people to start thinking about their travel plans for the approaching year. For those seeking uncommon travel experiences, the Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program offers the opportunity for a free two-week stay in historic lighthouse keepers’ quarters while helping to promote the history and preservation of the site. The application period to participate in the program in 2018 is now open.

Lighthouse Lens: Volunteer keepers learn about the history of the 1876 Tawas Point Lighthouse in preparation for duties that include giving tours and providing information about the lighthouse.

In 2018, the Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program offers combined vacation and service opportunities for adults from May 16 to Oct. 16. Those selected to be volunteer lighthouse keepers receive lodging in the restored keepers’ quarters next to the 1876 Tawas Point Lighthouse in Tawas Point State Park. In exchange, participants provide roughly 35 hours of services each week in and around the historic lighthouse that attracts visitors from all over the world.

“The Tawas area is known as Michigan’s Cape Cod,” said Hillary Pine, Tawas Point Lighthouse historian. “It’s a lovely area favored by bird-watchers, anglers, history enthusiasts and others. We make sure our volunteer lighthouse keepers have plenty of time to enjoy Lake Huron, Tawas Bay and other recreational opportunities.”

Keeper duties include greeting visitors, giving tours, providing information about the lighthouse, and routine cleaning and maintenance. Keepers stay in the second story of the keepers’ quarters attached to the lighthouse. Accommodations include two bedrooms sleeping up to four adults and modern kitchen, bath and laundry facilities. Keepers must commit to a two-week stay at the lighthouse. 

Pine said the lighthouse keeper program looks for teams of two, three or four adults—especially those with knowledge of lighthouse lore or Great Lakes maritime history—but that there is no requirement for such a background.

The museum portion of the Tawas Point Lighthouse shows artifacts from different time periods of its use.

“We give our volunteer lighthouse keepers historical information and on-site orientation to help prepare them for their experience,” Pine said. “They take great pride in helping to promote and preserve the lighthouse—and who wouldn’t love waking up to the beautiful view of the bay that they enjoy every day?”

The application and additional information about the Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program is available at www.michigan.gov/tawaslighthouse. For more information about program, send e-mail to DNR-tawaskeepers@michigan.gov. The application period is open through Feb. 2, 2018.

Tawas Point Lighthouse is a nationally accredited museum located 2.5 miles southeast of East Tawas, in Tawas Point State Park; a Recreation Passport is required for park entry. For more information, call 989-348-2537 or visit  www.michigan.gov/tawaslighthouse.

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Somber Reality

 

 

 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

My life’s mission of wilderness protection has gone awry. All hope is not lost to protect the resources and life forms that make it possible for humans to thrive today and for generations to live well a century from now. 

Theodore Roosevelt advised a century ago: “Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders. Do not let selfish men and greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches, or its romance.”

We are in a “Star Wars” type struggle to prevent planetary destruction by a leader that does not value scientific evidence or understand its importance for guiding behavior to ensure a healthy future. I hope to inspire others to cherish nature wonders by encouraging them to spend time outside exploring and having fun.

I made a decision early in life to follow supported physical evidence to protect my family and their offspring. I have an extended family that includes you, butterflies, cedar waxwings, brook trout, white pine, and cinnamon ferns in addition to my immediate family and grandchildren. Our actions should help all family members.

The Grand Staircase National Monument in Utah has known and unknown life forms in a fragile ecosystem. The monument is owned by you like the local Manistee National Forest, Shiawassee Nat’l Wildlife Refuge, and Sleeping Bear Dunes. Each has unique species and nature niches that support our lives and economy. 

When Roosevelt encouraged us to “cherish these natural wonders” much of USA land acquisition was complete. Here at home water supplies your well, trees cool homes and provide oxygen on private and public land. Many people feel they should be allowed to do whatever they desire on private and public lands without regard to impacts on neighbors. If they desire to dump PFAS, fill or plow wetlands that increased flooding to downstream homes, or dump improperly treated sewage in rivers, they should not be restricted. 

I realized as a teen that many people were solely focused on “Me, Myself, I.” Many do not agree that personal actions should protect themselves, neighbors’ water supply, soil fertility, stream quality, sustainable timber, and fellow beings on Earth. To protect resources of wonder, enjoyment and essential need for sustaining society, my mission advocates for wilderness protection. Protection of biological and geological features in designated wilderness, national monuments, and parks maintain healthy ecosystems supporting our needs and livelihoods.

Mistakes like dumping PFAS, overusing fertilizers on yards that get into streams or groundwater, delaying the switch from fossil fuels that alter climate, not treating life on Earth as we want to be treated, and reducing national monument sizes is perilous. It lacks a sense of community and does not leave these lands unimpaired. 

Ask yourself whether dumping PFAS or dumping carbon into the atmosphere will result in greater loss of life. Which will create worse economic and health hardships? For many it only matters what is happening personally in the moment. They are the half that put President Trump in office. Pulling out of the World Climate Accord is similar to dumping PFAS. The negative long-term impacts are imposed on future generations for short-term economic gains. Impacts diminish sustainable economic, social, and environment health. 

Impacts of the tax cut will likely result in unfunded protection of water, soil, air, endangered species, and wilderness as well many non-nature concerns. Trump campaigned to deregulate Clean Water, Clean Air, and Endangered Species Act protections. Such actions will allow deregulating things like dumping PFAS. He has opened protected public lands like the Arctic Wildlife Refuge and monuments for mineral extraction. He supports fossil fuel mining and dumping of pollutants like carbon into the atmosphere. His supporters want this.

I have failed in the effort to help build a critical mass essential to protect Grand Staircase NM and other national treasures. Public comments were 98 percent in favor of protecting parks but Trump is ignoring public desires. He’s eliminating sustainable resource programs that protect generations to come. My mission is floundering. 

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Diary of a snow shoveler

 

December 8: 6:00 p.m. The first snow of the season. My wife and I sat for hours watching the huge soft flakes drift down from heaven. So romantic we felt like newlyweds again. I love snow!

December 9: Woke to a beautiful blanket of crystal white snow. Moving here was the best idea I’ve ever had. Shoveled for the first time in years and felt like a boy again. The snow plow came along and covered up the sidewalks and closed in the driveway, so I got to shovel again. 

December 12:The sun melted all our lovely snow. My neighbor Bob said not to worry, we’ll have so much snow by the end of winter that I’ll never want to see snow again.

December 14: It snowed 8” last night. The temperature dropped to 20F. The cold makes everything sparkle so. I warmed up by shoveling the driveway and sidewalks. The snowplow came back and buried everything again. I didn’t realize I would have to do quite this much shoveling.

December 15: 12-14 inches forecast. Sold my van and bought a 4×4 Blazer. Bought 2 extra shovels. My wife wants a wood stove in case the electricity goes out. I think that’s silly.

December 16: Ice storm this morning. Fell on my butt on the ice in the driveway putting down salt. Hurt like heck. My wife laughed for an hour, which I think was cruel.

December 17: Roads too icy to go anywhere. Electricity’s been off for 5 hours. Piled blankets on to stay warm. Guess I should’ve bought a wood stove, but won’t admit it to her. I hate it when she’s right.

December 20: Electricity’s back on, but had another 14 inches of the white stuff last night. More shoveling. Stupid snowplow came by twice. Called the only hardware store around about buying a snow blower and they’re out. Might have another shipment in March. I think they’re lying. Bob says I have to shovel or the city will have it done and bill me. I think he’s lying.

December 22: 13 more inches of the white crap fell today, and it’s so cold it probably won’t melt till August. Tried to hire Bob who has a plow on his truck for the rest of the winter; but he says he’s too busy. I think the jerk is lying.

December 23: Only 2” of snow today and it warmed up to 0. My wife wanted me to decorate the front of the house this morning. Why didn’t she tell me to do that a month ago? She says she did but I think she’s lying.

December 24: Snow packed so hard by snowplow, I broke the shovel. Thought I was having a heart attack. If I ever catch the idiot who drives that snowplow, I’ll drag him through the snow. I know he hides around the corner and waits for me to finish shoveling and then he comes down the street at a 100 mph and throws snow all over where I’ve just been! Tonight my wife wanted me to sing Christmas carols with her and open our presents, but I was busy watching for the stinkin’ snowplow.

December 25: Merry Christmas. Snowed in. I hate the snow! The snowplow driver came by asking for a donation and I hit him over the head with my shovel. My wife says I have a bad attitude. I think she’s an idiot.

December 26: Still snowed in. Why did I ever move here? It was all HER idea. She’s really getting on my nerves.

December 27: Temperature dropped to -30 and the pipes froze. December 29: 10 more inches. Bob says I have to shovel the roof or it could cave-in. That’s the silliest thing I ever heard. 

December 30:  Roof caved in. The snow plow driver is suing me for $100,000 for the bump on his head. My wife went home to her mother. 9 inches predicted.

December 31: Set fire to what’s left of the house. No more shoveling!

January 8: I feel so good. I just love those little white pills they keep giving me. Why am I tied to the bed?

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Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.


Countdown to “Happy Noon” Year!

Dec. 30: We’re giving kids an exciting way to ring in 2018 with a countdown, noisemakers, crafts and fun – at an hour that won’t keep them up way past their bedtimes. Saturday, December 30th at 11:30 am at the Nelson Township/Sand Lake KDL Branch, 88 Eighth St. #52

God’s Kitchen in Cedar Springs

Jan. 2,9,16,23,30: Join us for dinner every Tuesday. God’s Kitchen – Cedar Springs welcomes families from Northern Kent County and the surrounding area to a Tuesday Evening Meal. No charge – no registration required!  Served from 5:30 – 6:30 pm at the St. John Paul II Parish, 3110 – 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs. For more information, call the Church office at 616-696-3904. #52

TOPS weight loss support group

Jan. 2: Need help keeping your New Year’s Resolution? Take off pounds sensibly (TOPS), a non-profit weight loss support group for men and women, meets every Tuesday at the Resurrection Lutheran Church in Sand Lake. Your first visit is free so come check out what TOPS can do to help you reach your weigh loss goals! Weigh-ins 8:15-9am, meeting starts at 9:15am. In case of inclement weather, meetings are cancelled if Tri-County or Cedar Springs schools are closed. Call Martha at 696-1039 for more information. #52

Explore MCC’s Kenneth J. Lehman Nature Trails

Montcalm Community College’s Kenneth J. Lehman Nature Trails are open to the public from dawn until dusk, 365 days a year. There is no charge to visit these beautiful trails winding through forests, grasslands and wetlands. More than four miles of trails are marked with numbered trail posts and maps are available at most major trail heads. For more information, please email naturetrails@montcalm.edu or call MCC Biology Instructor Heather Wesp 989-328-1270. #52

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