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Archive | June, 2017

Wildlife shot of the week

Ron Parker, of Courtland Township, sent us some great photos of one of their many chipmunks trying to get sunflower seeds out of one of their feeders. This cute little guy worked hard for them, and deserves all the sunflower seeds he can get!

Thanks, Ron, for sending us your photos!

Do you have a wildlife photo(s) you’d like to send us? Email them to news@cedarspringspost.com, and include your contact info and some information about the photo.

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Saginaw County man sentenced in illegal deer baiting case

Sugar beets are shown spread over a field where illegal baiting took place in November 2016.

A Saginaw County man was fined heavily, ordered to serve jail time, probation, and community service, and had his hunting privileges revoked when he was sentenced recently for deer hunting violations he committed during the fall 2016 firearm deer hunting season. Dexter James Sysak, 40, of Merrill, Michigan, was convicted by a District Court jury in April of multiple hunting violations, dating back to Nov. 29. He was sentenced June 21.

“Sysak had taken a dump truck of sugar beets and two dump trailers of corn and placed them on his hunting property,” said Michigan Conservation Officer Joseph Myers, who investigated the case. “The actual measure of bait was impossible to count but was estimated at two-and-a-half tons.”

Myers said conservation officers were alerted to a complaint of over use of bait via an anonymous tip to the DNR Report All Poaching hotline (800-292-7800) on Nov. 27.

The following day, officers went to the area, which turned out to be an old golf course—property owned by Sysak near the Gratiot-Saginaw county line. Myers said he found access to the site using a county road easement.

“I saw a hunting blind on the right and I could see an orange object through the trees,” Myers said. “It was a grain trailer full of corn with the door broken off and about 100 gallons of corn on the ground.”

Corn was spread over a wide area. Myers said he kicked a hard object while walking, which was a sugar beet.

“There was a 150-yard cobblestone road of sugar beets making a J-shape around the blind,” Myers said. “It looked like an individual had drove onto the property and just dumped the sugar beets out of a truck.”

With no name on the blind and no one at the site, Myers didn’t know who owned the land or the property. He decided to return the next day, Nov. 29.

“There was a truck parked there. I walked up to the blind and there were four individuals in the blind,” Myers said.

Myers said he saw Sysak pick up a hunter orange vest as Myers approached the blind.

After interviewing Sysak, Myers determined the bait, far in excessive of the 2-gallon limit, had been in the area for some time.

“Sysak also admitted to me that he had taken a 9-point buck over the illegal bait, making it an illegal deer,” Myers said. “I seized evidence and cited the suspect.”

Myers said Sysak showed him the gun he used and where he shot the deer from. He also told Myers which meat processor the deer had been taken to—a place just a couple miles down the road.

Myers contacted the processor and recovered the deer meat and antlers.

Sysak pleaded not guilty.

A jury trial was held April 28 in District Court 65B in Ithaca in Gratiot County, where Sysak was found guilty by the panel of six jurors on all three charges against him. Those misdemeanors included an over limit of bait, failing to wear hunter orange and taking a deer by an illegal method.

Myers said Sysak admitted the facts necessary to prove the case during his testimony at trial. He also admitted he had rented a dump truck to place the bait on the property.

Sysak was sentenced June 21 to serve 45 days in jail, fined roughly $15,000, including $6,500 reimbursement for the deer and ordered to serve 90 hours of community service to the DNR once his jail sentence is served. He was banned from all DNR activities during his 2-year probation term. All sport license privileges were revoked through 2022.

The meat from the deer will be given to needy families in the community.

There were extensive terms set for Sysak’s probation. If any of those terms are violated, it will be grounds for Sysak serving up to 1 year in jail and potential lifetime revoking of his hunting license privileges.

Michigan conservation officers are fully commissioned state peace officers that provide natural resources protection, ensure recreational safety and protect citizens by providing general law enforcement duties and lifesaving operations in the communities they serve.

Learn more about Michigan conservation officers at www.michigan.gov/conservationofficers.

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Dust baths

 

Ranger Steve Mueller

By Ranger Steve Mueller

The drama outside our window provides unending fascination. Deer blinds are primarily used during hunting season but consider sitting in a blind throughout the year. My friends are more patient when it comes to blind use for observing nature niches.

My friend, Don Wollander, would spend the day in a wildlife blind, with camera focused on a bird nest. He captured outstanding photographs and was rated the number one in world nature competition 13 of 14 years. People find countless ways to enjoy the natural world.

Using our home as a blind, we see things we would miss when walking natural areas. When traveling outdoors, we witness things like a deer chasing a coyote recently described in my column. If you missed it search on line at the Cedar Spring Post (www.cedarspringspost.com) where niche articles are archived. Another time a young fawn saw me standing still and approached, touched my knee with its nose before it thought, “You are not my mama!” and bounded off.

A turkey taking a dust bath. By Charles & Clint (Flickr) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From our home, we can view our backyard fire pit where we burn brush, roast hotdogs, and make “Some Mores.” Karen woke me to look out the bedroom window where there was a thick gray cloud in the still air over the fire pit. It was hard to see the turkey thrashing in the ash.

A wild turkey was taking a health improving dust bath. Frequently we find hollows in the sand along sanctuary trails where turkeys dry bathe. Dust bath sand is important for wild turkeys and fowl like chickens that are kept by people. The attuned nature observer will witness woodpeckers, robins, and other birds dust bathing. Water bird baths in the yard are good and get used but dry dust baths have special advantages.

Birds lie in bare sand and use wings to stir dry earth on themselves. They work the dirt into feathers. The turkey that discovered our powdered ash hit the jackpot. The fine powder works better than sand for suffocating external parasites likes lice, fleas, bedbugs, mites, ticks, and fly grubs. The dust helps clog spiracles that allow for parasite oxygen exchange. It is not 100 percent effective but neither is slapping mosquitoes for us.

The parasites might move to get away from the dust and the bird will more easily dislodge them from its body. Observe birds actively using their beak and legs to rid the body of parasites. Infested birds scratch and preen frequently. They exhibit broken or missing feathers. Do not confuse molting loss with parasite damage. When molting, they lose the same corresponding feather on both sides. Notice each wing is missing the same opposing feather during molting.

Someone with me tried to help a nestling that had a mosquito on its head. He reached to remove the mosquito. Five young Eastern Phoebes jumped from the nest. We gathered the birds and put them back in the nest. I held my hand over the young until they calmed. Slowly I removed my hand and the birds stayed. My hand was black with lice. Nests are havens for parasites. When birds fledge the nest, they can begin behavior to reduce blood-sucking parasites that cause anemia, weight loss and general ill health. Dust baths are important health aids.

The very fine ash so light it was suspended in air like a cloud was excellent for helping the bird. It penetrated the feathers and coated the skin like an insect repellant. We are not the only ones that use nature to our advantage.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Middle school girls track finishes undefeated season

The Middle School girls track team finished undefeated.

The girls middle school track team finished the regular season with an undefeated record.  This was the first year joining a new middle school conference and the girls excelled at the challenge. At the conclusion of the season, the 7th and 8th grade split their conference meets by grade level. The 7th grade team finished second, but only by a small margin.  The 8th grade team won their conference meet, which was also held at Red Hawk Stadium. This year the middle school team had a record number of girls out (87), which was a great thing for our program.

At the conclusion of the regular season, 15 girls represented Cedar Springs at the MegaStar meet, hosted at Shephard HS. In order to run in this event, they had to be part of the top 8 relays or top 16 individuals in their event in the state. The girls that attended the meet put down some incredible times and distances to finish 2nd overall as a team, to Traverse City West, a D1 team.

Seven school records were also broken this year. Abby Buttermore (70m), Kaelyn Colclasure (200m), Arianna Rau (400m), Sophia Dault (long jump & 55 hurdles), Arianna Rau (shot put) and the 400 relay team of Buttermore, Rau, Dault and Olivia Sherman.

Congratulations to these great young ladies and all the hard work they put in throughout the season. Each and everyone one of them dedicated themselves to working hard and as a result, saw their times/distances drop throughout the season.  Also a huge thank you to all our parents who supported the kids and parents throughout the season.  We definitely had the biggest crowd no matter where we were running!

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ROWENA JOY SMITH

Rowena Joy Smith, age 62, of Cedar Springs, went home to be with her heavenly father on June 27, 2017 surrounded by her family. She was born on November 1, 1954 to Robert and Thelma (Rookstool) White in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Rowena was a member of First Baptist Church of Cedar Springs where she taught Sunday School for 35 years. For years, Rowena served as a camp cook for Lincoln Lake Baptist Youth Camp. She was also the church custodian for many years. She loved spending time in her yard gardening growing vegetables and flowers. Rowena is survived by her husband of 34 years Dale Allen Smith; daughter, Katherine Joy (Curtis) DeJong; grandson, Cameron Dean DeJong; granddaughter DeJong; brother, Dan (Shelly) White; in-laws, Steven Smith, Michael Smith, Sharon (Jeff) Russell, Rose (Warren) Wright, Margaret (Robert) Parks, Vince (Brenda) Smith, Joani (Mike) Spicuzza, Debbie (Rob) Swider, James Smith; best friend, Sue VanEnk and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents. Visitation will be held Wednesday, July 5, 2017, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm at First Baptist Church – Cedar Springs, with funeral services following at 12:00 pm with her brother Reverend Dan White, officiating. Memorials may be made to assist the family. Please share your memories of Rowena online at www.fieldsmckinley.com.

Arrangements by Fields-Mckinley Funeral and Cremation Services

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Rev. Kim DeLong appointed to Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church

 

Rev. Kim DeLong

The Rev. Kim DeLong and the Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church have a common denominator in that they are both familiar with change. On July 1, the congregation welcomes yet another new pastor. Pastor Kim has moved about in West Michigan since she began in 1998. She has held appointments in Muskegon, Grand Rapids, Belding, Turk Lake, Greenville, and three Big Rapids area congregations linked together by assignment of the Michigan Area Bishop: Third Avenue, Paris, and Rodney. Her new appointment includes Courtland-Oakfield UMC and Wyoming Park UMC, serving half time in each congregation.

Kim’s broad experience began as a Local Pastor, which led Kim to attend Garrett-Evangelical Theological School, in order to be ordained a Deacon in the United Methodist Church. After serving as Deacon she then felt a call to move her ordination status to that of Elder, which she earned in 2016. This sojourn through the categories of professional ministry exposed her to opportunities to serve the church in a variety of circumstances, enlarging her vision of ministry while benefiting the congregations as well. She is a seasoned, gifted and learned pastor.

Courtland-Oakfield Governance Board Chair Megan Harding says, “We are really thrilled that Pastor Kim has agreed to serve our church, and I have total confidence that she will continue to lead us as we move forward with our values as we learn to become people who love as God loves.”

Kim lives in Rockford with her husband, Cameron. They have three children and four grandchildren.

Posted in Announcement, Church ConnectionComments (0)

Honesty

Rev. Chadrick Brown

 Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave NE

Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

When my wife and I meet, she had long, beautiful, blonde hair. I loved her hair. It is what initially attracted me to her. She kept her hair long and blonde until we had our first child and then off to the chopping block she went to get rid of it. I think I cried that day. Don’t get me wrong; my love for her didn’t change, nor did her beauty, but the hair was no more. She told me she would grow it back and she did. But every few years, once she gets it back to the way I like it, she cuts it off. And then comes the question that she always asks me after the hair gets cut: “Honey, what do you think? Do you like it? Do you like my hair cut?” And in my mind I scream, “No, no, no, no! I do not like it. I love your hair long and blonde. I want it long.” But then I quietly answer out loud, “Of course honey, I love it. It’s beautiful.”

I don’t think I am the only one that has ever done this. We all have had people in our lives ask a question and then answer them by telling them what they want to hear. Television sitcoms often depict funny situations where a person says what they think another person wants to hear. In fiction, it’s funny to see a person tell their boss or spouse what they want to hear.

Unfortunately, these situations aren’t funny when they really occur in our lives. We all want to have people in our lives who answer our questions honestly even when the honest answer may not be a pleasure to hear.

In Proverbs 24:26, from the Message Translation of God’s word, it says, “An honest answer is like a warm hug.” How awesome is that? How comforting is that?

Honesty is hard at times. But it’s necessary. Why? It’s necessary to build trust. It’s necessary to have healthy relationships. It’s necessary if we are ever going to get beyond the surface of relationships and begin to go deeper. It’s necessary if we are ever going to truly help each other and comfort each other.

I want to challenge you today to build your relationships on honesty. You will enjoy the peace of mind that comes from knowing your friend is always giving you an honest answer. Your friends will enjoy the trust and confidence of a relationship where they can be honest without fearing repercussions if you don’t like their answer to your question. Everyone in a relationship benefits when it’s built on honesty.

And yes, I practice what I preach. I always tell my wife that her hair is beautiful, no matter what the length of her hair is, even though she knows, I miss her long hair.

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BOB W. ROSENBERGER

 

Bob W. Rosenberger Sr., 78 of Cedar Springs, died Thursday, June 22, 2017 at his home. He was born August 2, 1938 in Sparta, Michigan the son of Jacob and Dorothy (Call) Rosenberger. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and served in the U.S. Army for 22 years. His family was very important and first in his life. He could build or fix anything and was always there for others. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and the Shriners. Surviving are his children, Bob (Mary) Rosenberger, Debra (Mike) Hage, Mark (Lynne) Rosenberger, Paul (Laine) Rosenberger, Cathy (Dan) Wiginton, Sondra Walker, Terry (Trudy) Wendt, Mary (Don) Wojtowicz, Ryan (Nancy) Wendt; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren; brothers, Melvin Rosenberger, Jim (Betty) McDonald; sister, Beatrice Singleton; sister-in-law, Judy Rosenberger. He was preceded in death by five brothers and one sister. A memorial service was held Tuesday, June 27th at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. Interment Idlewild Cemetery, Kent City. Memorial contributions may be made to the Friends of the Michigan Veterans Home or the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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Thank you

Arlene Myers wishes to say thank you for her 90th Birthday Party on June 17th at Ensley Township Hall. Thank you for the many well-wishers, cards and gifts. It added to all the good memories.

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The detective goes camping

 

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson were going camping. They pitched their tent under the stars and went to sleep.

Sometime in the middle of the night Holmes woke Watson up and said: “Watson, look up at the sky, and tell me what you see.”

Watson replied: “I see millions and millions of stars.”

Holmes said: “and what do you deduce from that?”

Watson replied: “Well, if there are millions of stars, and if even a few of those have planets, it’s quite likely there are some planets like earth out there. And if there are a few planets like earth out there, there might also be life.”

And Holmes said: “Watson, you idiot, it means that somebody stole our tent.”

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