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Archive | April, 2017

LOREN TEESDALE

 

In loving memory of Loren Teesdale who passed away 15 years ago on April 23, 2002.

Today, like many other days

brings special thoughts of you

of happy times we shared

and caring things you used to do

And once more, it’s a reminder

that life’s road is sometimes rough

because the time we shared

just wasn’t long enough

For you were someone special

who was thought so highly of

who’ll always be remembered

with affection, warmth and love

So sending thoughts to heaven

on the day you went away

and hope you know you’re missed

more than words could ever say

Deeply missed and loved by 

June, Michelle & Noah

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In Loving Memory of BENJAMIN WALL

 

Our loving husband, dad, grandpa, and great-grandpa who joined the Lord sixteen years ago, April 30, 2001. Spring has come and so are all the memories of loving you. Our lives go on without you but nothing is the same. We have to hide our heartaches when someone speaks your name. Sad are the hearts that love you, silent the tears that fall. Living our lives without you is the hardest part of all. You did so many things for us. Your heart was kind and true and when we needed someone, we could always count on you. The special years will not return when we were all together, but with the love within our hearts a part of us went with you the day God took you home.

Greatly loved and missed by your loving wife Rosalynn; sons, Dennis (Cindy), Dean (Kristie); grandchildren Cory (Mandy), Zachary (Angie), Molly (Matt), Emily (Marshall), Nate (Kalli); great-grandchildren, Megan, Cody, Allie, Abbie, Maddie, Izzy, Tristin, Ashley, Aubrey, Easton, Lilly, Landon Benjamin and Caleb.

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Choices—today and every day

C-Cedar-Creek-Community-Church-LandscapePastor Dick Nichols

Cedar Creek Community Church

2969 14 Mile Road, Sparta

 

God has a plan for each and every one of us, for life, and gives us the privilege to make choices as we journey through the process of fully living our life.

Jesus assures us: “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” (John 10:10, New International version.)

The bible tells us that before we were born, God knew us. God knows who each of us are, much better than we know ourselves; and he knows not only why, but the reason for when and where he purposed us to begin life. It took me many years to discover that my life did not come about by accident. God is the Creator, the Giver of life, on purpose.

Not only has God purposed each and every life, through the writer of Proverbs, he has also given us wonderful direction: “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight.” (Proverbs 3:5-6 NIV.)

Trusting God with all of our heart is how we show that our faith in him is real.  This is not a piecemeal trust; the call is to a complete trust in him with our whole heart, putting our whole life in his hands. Often, we think we know better than God, when in reality, like Adam and Eve in the beginning, our wisdom and understanding is weak, crooked and unreliable. It’s like trying to walk with a foam rubber walking cane; if we lean on it, we’re going to fall over.

This is where I find myself sometimes coming up short of what God knows would provide life to the fullest. It is easy for Christians to make plans and set goals, expecting God to fall in behind them. I believe though, that we aren’t being fair to God, ourselves and others, when we insist on doing just what we want to do, while not letting God handle through us, the situations that pop up in life.

We must turn that around. Otherwise, the greatness of our God will not be seen by the unbelieving world around us. I learned many years ago, that if I wanted to go boating, I must first, get on the boat. I have to trust that the person piloting the boat is a good pilot; while trusting that the boat won’t sink.  It is simple, getting on board is an act of faith.

In all our ways acknowledging him, means exactly what it says, coupled with the promise, “and he will make your paths straight.” This appears to be an encouraging promise, which it is; a promise that with God’s help as we trust in him, we will eventually reach the destination that he has in mind for us. But it is also a warning. It reminds us that our path in life is God’s path, and his way may not be the way we would have chosen for ourselves.

If we want to find God’s will for our life, first, we have to put our trust in God. Acknowledging the Lord is surrendering to God’s will and starting on the journey; it’s putting our faith into action. In other words, be prepared to go where God wants to take you, trusting in him to make the way clear.

God’s word reveals his heart and love for us, “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” (Jeremiah 29:11 NIV.) The God we serve in this life is the God we will serve for eternity; choose wisely.

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Public lands are Earth Day’s unsung heroes

Tahquamenon River fall forest: An aerial view of the Tahquamenon River and the surrounding fall forest, a popular tourist destination in the eastern end of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Tahquamenon River fall forest: An aerial view of the Tahquamenon River and the surrounding fall forest, a popular tourist destination in the eastern end of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Pollution prevention, water filtration among the natural benefits

Want to celebrate an Earth Day hero? Look no further than the nearest parcel of state-managed public land in any corner of Michigan.

Last weekend we celebrated Earth Day, and it’s a good time to appreciate our state-managed public lands for all they do to enhance quality of life in Michigan. The Department of Natural Resources manages 4.6 million acres of land for the public’s use and enjoyment, including state forests, game areas, recreation areas and parks. Aside from the high-value cultural, recreational and economic opportunities they provide, Michigan’s public lands have enormous impact on the quality of our environment and natural resources.

The lands reduce air pollution, protect water quality, provide flood retention and offer critical wildlife habitat. Like true heroes, they do their jobs without fanfare.

“People usually associate public lands with outdoor adventures such as camping, hiking or hunting,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “But they may not realize the tremendous natural benefits these spaces provide. Their contributions to the health of Michigan’s environment, natural resources and citizens are many. That’s why proper management of these valued public lands is so critical.”

Maple River SGA: Maple River State Game Area, covering more than 9,200 acres in Clinton, Gratiot and Ionia counties, offers residents and visitors access to wildlife viewing, hunting and other outdoor exploration. It provides substantial acreage for pheasant and other wildlife habitat.

Maple River SGA: Maple River State Game Area, covering more than 9,200 acres in Clinton, Gratiot and Ionia counties, offers residents and visitors access to wildlife viewing, hunting and other outdoor exploration. It provides substantial acreage for pheasant and other wildlife habitat.

Ways in which public lands improve our environment, natural resources and even public health include:

Pollution prevention. Forests and wetlands on public lands benefit the environment by serving as natural “purifiers.” For example, trees help reduce air pollution by absorbing pollutants and increasing oxygen levels in the atmosphere. Wetlands play a vital role by filtering pollutants from surface runoff, and breaking down fertilizers, pesticides and other contaminants into less harmful substances.

Improved water quality.

Tree roots hold soil together and soak up moisture, which enhances water quality and prevents erosion. In addition to filtering pollutants, wetlands improve water quality by recharging groundwater supplies when connected to underground aquifers. They also contribute to natural nutrient and water cycles.

Storm water management.

In natural landscapes like forests, the soil absorbs water and pollutants resulting from runoff from hard surfaces such as driveways and parking lots. This is especially important in reducing flooding.

Wildlife habitat.

Fields, forests, waterways and wetlands provide Michigan’s wildlife with the vibrant ecosystems they need to thrive.

Better health.

Nature plays a huge role in the physical and emotional health of Michiganders. The ability of trees and grasslands to filter air pollution reduces negative health effects on people with respiratory ailments. Plus, state-managed public lands—offering trails, boat launches, campgrounds and other outdoor recreation options—provide any number of opportunities for exercise and fitness. Of course, trees, lakes and rivers offer calming effects that are emotionally gratifying as well.

Good stewardship.

Michigan’s public lands promote good environmental stewardship. They allow for initiatives such as Michigan’s Wetland Wonders, which provide exceptional waterfowl hunting opportunities through the world-class management of the state’s seven premier Managed Waterfowl Hunt Areas. The DNR also is pursuing an innovative wetland mitigation program that harnesses public lands to help offset the loss of wetlands.

“We’re a cleaner, healthier Michigan because of our public lands,” Creagh said. “So much of what they do for us happens without notice. But Earth Day provides a good opportunity to appreciate all our state-managed public lands do for the citizens of Michigan.”

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Fishing with feet

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Ranger Steve Mueller

Ranger Steve Mueller

A reader told me that I probably would not believe him but he said he caught a trout with his foot. Before he said more, I said, “I believe you because I have also.” How many others have done the same? Trout fishing season is under way but angling with feet is not a chosen fishing tactic.

The reader was wading a stream when a fish tried to dart past him just as he stepped down and caught the fish between foot and substrate. My experience was similar.

In Calf Creek in Utah, I was wading bare foot in a small desert stream fed by snow melt and ground water from Boulder Mountain. The mountain road summit was over 12,000 feet with a spruce/fir forest in highest locations and ponderosa pines in the 8,000-foot range. Down the mountain, pinyon pines and juniper trees reigned at 7,000 feet.

Calf Creek was at 5,500 feet but that water remained cold, rich in oxygen, and full of trout food. Willows and other woody plants were abundant along the three to ten feet wide creek. In most places the creek was one to twelve inches deep. A beaver constructed a couple dams and created a pond where it built a lodge. After a few years, the beaver exhausted its food supply. The pond filled and became a wet meadow full of life.

It surprised me to see a Great Blue Heron standing on a bare sandstone desert cliff over Calf Creek. It made sense because trout were present for the heron to hunt in the stream’s shallow clear cold water.

My barefoot walk for about two miles was in the stream’s cold water but the desert air was near 100 F. The stream bed was mostly bare sandstone a few inches deep with frequent holes a foot to three feet deep. Deep holes were places the trout hid in shadows. They often remained stationary in shallow water with use of their powerful tail muscles beating just enough to hold their stable position.

As I walked downstream, a trout facing upstream was alarmed by my presence and attempted to dart past me up stream. My right foot was just coming down as the trout slipped between my foot and rock. The fish’s body pressed against the bottom of my foot and was squeezed to the sandstone stream bed.

Quickly, I shifted my weight to my left foot to prevent hurting the fish. Too late. The fish began to roll downstream stunned by physical trauma. I picked up the fish and held it with head upstream to allow water to flow over the gills.

For several minutes, I hoped it would recover as it continued to open and close its mouth. Each time I released it, it could not swim and rolled in the current. After considerable time, I let the fish roll out sight.

Such events are now out of sight but not out of mind. It occurred in the 1990’s but stays with me. Previously, I wrote about this in my column. Like most stories shared with family and friends, they get repeated at gatherings, campouts, or in another group setting. We all have experiences to share and reminisce.

Many do not end in tragedy like it did for this trout. When you are fishing or on adventures into the wondrous world around us, remember to bring back fish stories or those of your personal experiences with wildlife and nature niches. Truthful stories are best and most interesting. Exaggerated “fish stories” are not necessary. The more time you are outdoors the more exciting stories you will accumulate for sharing.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Michigan Boating

OUT-Boating-lake-michigan-10

Five Great Lakes, Five Great Boating Tips

From the Michigan DNR

Boaters are smart, creative and resourceful. That’s why we want to hear tips from Michigan boaters.

This month, we’re starting with five “musts” as you get ready for the season. Our featured boater is a 46-year sailing veteran from the home port of Sanilac. Glen Stephens has sailed inland lakes, the Great Lakes, Tampa Bay and the Virgin Islands. Here is his list of “musts” before you set sail:

  • Insurance! The costs of recovery are FAR greater than any seasonal insurance premium.
  • Become a better boater with a Coast Guard Auxiliary course at http://www.cgaux.org/boatinged/.
  • Have a ship-to-shore radio on board all the time. Cell phone reception can be spotty on the Great Lakes.
  • Double-check the venting of your fuels to be sure they are clean and positioned properly.
  • Sailors should have bolt cutters on hand in case you ever need to cut away your rig. (Let’s hope not!)

Next, we are seeking your list of five great boating destinations in Michigan. Share your list via email at turekm@michigan.gov and you could be our featured boater!

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Girls tennis earns wins against Lowell, Greenville

Mandi Titus, one half of the number three doubles team at Cedar Springs, returns a ball during the match at Greenville. Courtesy photo.

Mandi Titus, one half of the number three doubles team at Cedar Springs, returns a ball during the match at Greenville. Courtesy photo.

The Lady Red Hawks Varsity tennis team turned in solid wins last week in away matches at Lowell and Greenville.

On Monday, April 17, Cedar Springs traveled to Lowell, and defeated them 8-0. Wins were earned by number one singles Emilee Pastoor (6-1, 6-1); number two singles Michaela Tawney (6-2, 6-2); number three singles Sam Finch (7-5, 6-1); and number four singles Jess Brunett (6-2, 6-1). Doubles teams earning wins were number one doubles Anna Behrenwald and Maria Rios (6-2, 6-0); number two doubles Morgan Shevock and Anna Krupp (6-1, 6-2); number three doubles Mandi Titus and MaKeelie Lemery (6-4, 7-6, 7-5); and number four doubles Leslie Rios and Malory Shevock (6-3, 6-4).

On Wednesday, April 19, Cedar Springs traveled to Greenville. Cedar Springs took the win 6-2. Matches were won by number one singles Emilee Pastoor (6-2, 6-0); number two singles Michaela Tawney (6-1, 6-1); number three singles Sam Finch (6-1, 6-2); number four singles Jess Brunett (6-0, 6-2); number two doubles Anna Krupp and Morgan Shevock (6-2, 6-3) and number four doubles Leslie Rios and Malory Shevock (6-1, 6-1).

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JV golf loses to Rockford, takes fourth at jamboree

 

The Cedar Springs JV golf team lost to Rockford 200-214 in a dual at Cedar Chase on Monday April 17. Austin Emmorey and Carson Svalin shot 51’s, Josh Allen 54, and Jacob Burgert 57.

The Red Hawks also competed in their first OK White Jamboree at Cedar Chase on Wednesday, April 19,and finished 4th with a score of 201.  Emmorey was medalist with a 45, Allen 51, Trey Lewis 52, and Svalin a 53. Dane Conley and Jared Hause both shot 61’s.

“The 201 was one of our best JV scores in a long time, and Austin’s 45 was a solid score,” said Coach London. “However, the 61’s got us 4th because we tied Lowell and their scores were better than Lowell’s 62.”

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Hawks win conference series

Logan Kobayashi had a good week calling games behind the plate for the JV Red Hawks. Here he is shown in one of the games against Greenville.

Logan Kobayashi had a good week calling games behind the plate for the JV Red Hawks. Here he is shown in one of the games against Greenville.

JV Baseball

Last week was a good week for the JV Red Hawks baseball team. They went 2-2 for the week and won the conference series against Greenville. They were only a couple of plays away from being 4-0.

Coach Tyson Hoffman said, “Typically in baseball average is about .500 baseball. We hit that this week, but were right on the cusp of being above average. The difference is just a couple plays that we need to make.”

The week ended with a 4-2 loss against Grant. Tuesday’s games against Greenville were wins, 11-3 and 9-4. Thursday, April 20, they lost to Greenville 5-4.

“After the game against Grant, we really improved our base running, had timely hitting, and made the plays we needed to make,” said Hoffman. “We were evenly matched with Greenville and it took the little things to get the series win.”

Logan Kobayashi had a good week calling games behind the plate and showed great base running instincts.

This week’s games will be against Grand Rapids Ottawa Hills.

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Veterans are coming

POST SCRIPTS NOTICE: The Cedar Springs Post welcomes letters of up to 350 words. The subject should be relevant to local readers, and the editor reserves the right to reject letters or edit for clarity, length, good taste, accuracy, and liability concerns. All submissions MUST be accompanied by full name, mailing address and daytime phone number. We use this information to verify the letter’s authenticity. We do not print anonymous letters, or acknowledge letters we do not use. Writers are limited to one letter per month. Email to news@cedarspringspost.com, or send to Post Scripts, Cedar Springs Post, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

 


 

That’s right folks, we hope that after much red tape, it looks like the red, white, and blue will be coming to live in good old Cedar Springs. One of our problems was a code that wanted two parking spaces for each of the residents. Problem solved by WEFA president Fred Cini. If they should own cars, they have written permission to park on the WEFA paved parking lot. And would you believe it, he even asked if any would be employable. What a guy! He represents what Cedar Springs is all about. It also appears “just maybe” the planning commission will accept a copy of our original site plan, which would save us over $5,000.

You are invited on Saturday, April 29, to a preview of what can happen at the facility (the old Amish Warehouse Store, corner of Main and Beech) from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00, and you will see what those monies were spent on: a new pool table, shuffle board table, and air hockey table. Thanks to the overwhelming generosity of area people, we were donated a new $1,600 bow flex machine; a beautiful electronic organ; a large electronic read out treadmill; plus a nearly new foosball table. And a big thank you to all you folks that wanted to donate to the already full game room area. Every Veteran and their families should be at the May 2nd Planning Commission meeting at 7:00 p.m.

Bob Truesdale, Cedar Springs

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