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Archive | October, 2016

Girls Volleyball take losses against FHN, FHC

Red Hawk Volleyball seniors (L to R): Ali Sparling, Lyndsey Lehman, Brooke Morris, Sienna Wight and Kaitlyn Coons.

Red Hawk Volleyball seniors (L to R): Ali Sparling, Lyndsey Lehman, Brooke Morris, Sienna Wight and Kaitlyn Coons.

The Cedar Springs Varsity Volleyball team competed on three days this past week beginning on Tuesday night (Oct 18) when they traveled to Forest Hills Northern for a conference match that resulted in a 0-3 match loss. Senior Middle hitter Brooke Morris led in kills on the night with 5 and tallied one block while Baylie VanDyke added 4 kills and three blocks (including 2 solo blocks).  Sydney Plummer added 3 kills, 2 digs, and an ace, while Libero Kaitlyn Coons recorded 11 digs and 26 serve receives. Setter Sienna Wight and Ali Sparling each put up 7 assists.

The Lady Redhawks hosted Class A ranked Forest Hills Central Thursday evening (10/20) ending in a 0-3 conference loss: 15-25, 11-25 and 13-25. The night, which the programs seniors and parents were honored at their last home match, was led with a solid performance by senior setter Sienna Wight, who had the team high 26 Sets and 12 assists. Sydney Plummer rallied with 8 kills, 12 digs and 2 blocks. Senior Setter Ali Sparlinghad 11 assists, 4 kills and 3 blocks, while Kaitlyn Coons recorded 14 digs and 25 serve receives. Middle blocker Brooke Morris added 7 kills and 2 blocks, while Lyndsey Lehman played a strong defensive game with 3 digs and 10 serve receives.

The ladies rounded out the week competing at the Sparta High School Invite Saturday (Oct 22), where they played in three matches ending in a loss in the Silver Bracket finals against Comstock Park. The competition began for the Lady Red Hawks with an impressive match against rival Greenville, falling 26-27 (games capped in Pool Play at 27), 25-18 and 20-25. The next match was against host Sparta and handed over a 0-3 loss (16-25, 14-25 and 24-26. In the Silver Bracket Finals, the Red Hawks took a loss to Comstock Park 10-25 and 14-25. Senior Middle hitter Brooke Morris led the offense with 15 kill and 9 blocks and Ali Sparling contributed 14 kills, 7 blocks, 27 assists, 7 aces and a team high 16 service points. Sydney Plummer, who left the tournament play in the second match with an injury, tallied 14 kills and 15 digs on the day, while Baylie VanDyke added 8 kills and a team high 11 blocks. Setter Sienna Wight had 27 assists, 3 blocks and 10 digs. Leading on defense was Libero Kaitlyn Coons with 34 digs and 58 serve receives. Also having a solid day on serve receives were Lindsey Lehman and Rachel Bouwers with 20 each.

The Lady Red Hawks (5-22-2) return to action at Northview Thursday night (10/27), travel to Central Montcalm on Saturday (10/29) for tournament play, and begin Districts on Monday, October 31, when they play Lowell at Lowell.

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Rocket football team completes undefeated season

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The Cedar Springs third and fourth grade Rocket football team coached by head coach Brian Egan and assistant coaches Greg Curtis and Jesse Smith completed an undefeated season this past Saturday with an exciting 26-0 victory over the visiting West Side Falcons.

The win closed out a blowout season where not a single point was scored on the Red Hawks defense all season, outscoring their competition 202-0.

During the season the Red Hawks had a powerful offense led by quarterback Sawyer Smith, tail backs Luke Egan, Rory Schoenborn, Kaiden Dreyer, Jacob Thompson. With solid execution of a handful of plays these offensive players were a force to be reckoned with. The powerful defensive lineup led by Isaiah Kukla and supported by team mates Dane Nienhuis, Trenton Underwood, Marcus Caruso, Branson Wood and others held back almost all attempts to move the ball.

 

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Middle school cross country finishes record setting season 

The CSMS girls and boys track teams had a great season.

The CSMS girls and boys track teams had a great season.

Middle school girls with first place plaque.

Middle school girls with first place plaque.

The Cedar Srings Middle School cross country team started off the season with a record amount of athletes.  No team has been larger than the team that competed this year. The cross team also was put into a new league that aligns more with the teams that the High School teams compete against. However, that didn’t stop these athletes from rising above and competing hard. Week after week, each one of the runners worked hard and the results were evident.

At the conference meet held on Oct 18, the boys team finished 3rd overall out of 8 teams. These were all teams they battled back and forth with all season. Corey Bowers was conference champion leading the way for the Red Hawks. Austin Mann, Alex Nylaan, Spencer Bray, and Caleb Menefee all set season personal bests to round out the top five scoring. Carter Moleski, Sam Kleyenberg, Justin Voskuil, Andy Luke, Nate VanKampen, Andy Luke, Andrew Koning, Gabe White, Drew Mattson, Cayden Steinebach, Ian Little and Justin Kennedy Johnson also ran exceptional races to help their team out.

The girls team was conference champions for the second year in a row, setting another record. Again with a tougher conference, the girls prevailed and almost all ran their personal bests. Kaelyn Colclasure, Lauren Lett, Abby Buttermore, Paige Marsman, and Sierra Johnson placed in the top 20. This was the first time Cedar Springs has had five runners in the top 20 at a conference meet. Alexis Wood, Olivia Sherman, Chloe Grifhorst, Ella See and Grace Sova finished right on their heels setting new personal best times. The following girls also set new personal best times helping their team to victory:  Emma Waller, Kirsten Parker, Aubrie French, Lily Howland, Kristen Perry, Cloe Shoffner, Muriel Cook, Emily Caldwell, Julia Pecker, Isabel Vandusen, Abbey Shotko, Brilynn Smith, and Emily Neiderheide.

Congratulations to a great season to all our runners!!

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Be an ethical hunter: buy a license before you go 

out-ethical-hunter-deer

And don’t loan kill tags

Conservation officers with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources urge deer hunters to engage in an ethical hunt: Buy a license before going out and don’t loan kill tags.

Every deer hunting season, DNR conservation officers encounter individuals engaged in unethical hunting practices. These officers tackle many cases of individuals buying hunting licenses after harvesting deer or loaning kill tags to friends or relatives.

“Each year, we see cases of individuals waiting to buy licenses until after they have shot a deer,” said Dean Molnar, assistant chief of the DNR’s Law Enforcement Division. “We remind all hunters that you must buy your license before you go out to hunt and have it in your possession when afield. Buying a license is not only the ethical and responsible thing to do; it is the law. Harvesting a deer without a license is poaching.”

Deer poaching in Michigan carries a restitution payment of $1,000 per deer, a $200 to $1,000 fine and jail time up to 90 days. In addition, a violator’s hunting privileges are suspended for three years. Under the new law that took effect in 2014, antlered deer are assessed an additional $1,000 in restitution plus the standard $1,000 for illegally killing any deer. In addition, deer with eight points but not more than 10 are $500 a point, while deer with 11 points or more are assessed a penalty of $750 per point.

Additional years of hunting privileges will be revoked for violators. This includes an additional two years of revoked hunting privileges for the first offense and an additional seven years for a second or subsequent offences. Michigan also participates in the Wildlife Violator Compact, which includes hunting revocation in participating states.

Another unethical practice encountered frequently each hunting season in Michigan is the loaning of kill tags to an unlicensed individual who has harvested a deer.

“Loaning kill tags is among the top violations we see while on patrol, and is often done for friends or relatives who are from out of state to avoid paying the nonresident license fee,” said Molnar. “Kill tags must be validated and attached immediately to your harvested deer and visible for inspection. It is unlawful to loan out or borrow kill tags.”

For more information on deer hunting in Michigan, go to www.michigan.gov/deer.

To report a natural resource violation, please call the Report All Poaching hotline at 800-292-7800. Learn more at www.michigan.gov/rap.

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Youth waterfowl hunts at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders

Youth waterfowl hunts at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders, the seven premier managed waterfowl hunt areas in the state, offer kids a memorable hunting experience.

Youth waterfowl hunts at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders, the seven premier managed waterfowl hunt areas in the state, offer kids a memorable hunting experience.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources invites waterfowlers to bring their young hunters to one of Michigan’s Wetland Wonders in October and November for a memorable hunting experience. Hunters can choose from several dates and locations for youth waterfowl hunts. Parties with at least one youth will be given priority in the draw at all seven Wetland Wonders:

Oct. 22 – Nayanquing Point Wildlife Area (afternoon hunt only) in Pinconning

Oct. 29 – Muskegon County Wastewater (morning and afternoon hunts) in Twin Lake

Oct. 29 – Fish Point State Wildlife Area (afternoon hunt only) in Unionville

Nov. 5 – Fennville Farm Unit of the Allegan State Game Area (morning hunt only) in Fennville

Nov. 5 – Shiawassee River State Game Area (afternoon hunt only) in St. Charles

Nov. 11 – Harsens Island Managed Hunt Area (afternoon hunt only) on Harsens Island

Nov. 13 – Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (morning hunt only) in Rockwood

Drawings for the youth morning hunts will occur at 5:30 a.m. and for the youth afternoon hunts at 11 a.m. (11:30 a.m. at Harsens Island).

Youth priority drawings are available for hunting parties with at least one youth (16 and younger) and up to two adults (maximum party size is four). Youth hunters 9 years old and younger must be accompanied by a qualified Mentored Youth Hunting Program mentor.

Only parties including youth hunters will be allowed to hunt at Fennville Farm the afternoon of Nov. 5, and only youth will be permitted to shoot during this hunt.

All youth participating in these priority hunts must be properly licensed to hunt. Youth up to the age of 9 need only a Mentored Youth Hunting license to hunt waterfowl. Youth 10-15 years of age need a junior base license only, and youth ages 16 and older need a junior base license, a waterfowl license with Harvest Information Program survey questions answered and a Federal Duck Stamp.

Michigan’s Wetland Wonders are the seven premier managed waterfowl hunt areas in the state. These areas, scattered across the southern Lower Peninsula, were created in the 1960s to provide exceptional waterfowl hunting opportunities and still are managed today to provide waterfowl habitat for nesting and migration and for the benefit of other wetland wildlife. Since the beginning, the areas have been funded by hunting license fees and area use fees, but they are open for anyone to visit, use and enjoy most of the year.

For more information about hunting the managed waterfowl hunt areas, visit www.michigan.gov/wetlandwonders.

Don’t forget that the Wetland Wonders Challenge, sponsored by Consumers Energy, runs until Feb 12, 2017. Youth and adult hunters who hunt at three managed waterfowl hunt areas can be entered in the contest. Hunt at more than three areas for additional contest entries. Seven hunters will be chosen to win ultimate waterfowl hunting prize packages valued at $1,500, including a “golden ticket” good for one first-choice pick at a managed waterfowl hunt area for the 2017-18 season (non-reserved). See www.michigan.gov/wetlandwonders for contest terms and conditions.

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Tracks 

Ranger Steve Mueller

Ranger Steve Mueller

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Take a walk in the sand and discover new sounds and sights. When walking along Lake Michigan’s Shoreline or an inland lake find a place where the sand sings to you. If too close to water’s edge or too far away, the land will not speak. Find the correct location between wet beach and dry sand where the sand sings. It requires the exact ratio of water to sand to create sound. You can force sound production in any location but when you walk the right path, the sand will speak freely in a narrow band of beach.

It is up to you to interpret what singing sand has to say. Use your imagination and include family members or friends to discuss meaning. Examine scientific details of the sound creation or just have fun with the phenomenon.

While enjoying time on the beach with sun, waves, color, and ever changing surroundings, begin exploring your own tracks. It will be a great introduction into the world of animal tracking. Shed shoes and walk in areas covered and uncovered by lapping waves. You will have little time to examine your tracks before they are erased by the next oncoming wave. Step inland from wave-covered areas where track details will remain longer. Notice your foot print details. Dry sand does not produce good track detail.

In damp sand, what parts of your print show detail? Are parts of your foot missing? Are toes evenly spaced? Are toes of equal length or show equal impression? Compare your print with those of others. Can you recognize your footprint from that of friends? Do you walk with more or less pressure on your heel or ball of foot? Is there greater imprint pressure along the side of the print? Zig-zag and see if print impressions change.

Once you notice human foot print details of depth, shifting directions, size, and speed of movement, one can make better sense of animal tracks.

Animal size is one of the first things that can be determined but one can be fooled. Karen and I were portaging a canoe in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area of northern Minnesota when we encountered a moose track that was almost a foot long and six inches wide. This is about double the normal size. Had we discovered the “Big Foot” of the moose population? No. The moose was walking in mud and the print expanded in the soft mud. I have done the same with my footprints in light snow where my tracks appeared twice normal size.

If animals are moving in groups, recognize heavier animals from lighter animals by the depth of imprints if the ground is soft enough to hold imprints. Exploring animal prints on wet shorelines of lakes or streams helps. Tracking on fallen leaves through the forest is nearly impossible.

What can be followed through the forest are animal paths.  Animals often use the same path and create a trail just wide enough for their movement. When I walk deer paths, I am amazed how narrow they are and how low branches hang. It seems the deer must be very short. The narrowness seems too close for a buck to travel without snagging antlers. Along the trail, I discover this is not true because buck antler scrapes are evident on small trees.

Bucks stop to scrape velvet from antlers as blood vessels in the skin covering begin to die and itch. They also battle with small saplings to make noise to announce breeding territory. It is easy to find scrapes when one follows a deer trail. I find some scrapes that are many years old. When a tree is not damaged too severely, it grows in diameter and the deer scrape scars grow with the tree bark. When people carve initials in aspen bark, the initial scars grow as the tree grows. Take time to look for tracks and signs of animals.

Begin tracking discoveries with your own tracks along beautiful lake or stream shores and then discover nature niche nuances created by animal movements. One will never become bored with wild outdoor wonders. Fall tracking practice will lead to fun winter snow adventures with mice to large mammals and birds.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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From easy art to a sweet treat

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Family Features

Spooky, silly or symbolic, carved pumpkins are an essential ingredient to any Halloween celebration. This year, scare up some special fun for your party with a wicked watermelon carving instead—but don’t stop there.

After crafting your watermelon into an artful mummy, take advantage of the healthy, immune-system supporting qualities of the lycopene leader among fresh produce. At 92 percent water, as well as an excellent source of vitamins A and C, watermelon is a hydrating post-art snack.

Carving a creative design into a watermelon is a simple way to kick off the festivities and requires only a handful of common tools. Add a twinkling candle to make a fantastically frightful centerpiece. Or fill it with a fresh fruit salad or salsas for a more functional, practical approach.

Even if you’re planning on a hollowed-out carving, keep the sweet juicy fruit and make it a healthy addition to your Halloween party menu with a recipe that puts to use all your carving leftovers.

To take advantage of all a watermelon has to offer—outside of the fun carving—try Frosted, Frozen Watermelon Balls or Kids Watermelon Pizza Supreme. These fun, simple recipes make it easy to incorporate a healthy snack after all your hard work carving up a Halloween masterpiece.

Find more recipes, carving patterns and inspiration at watermelon.org.

Carving Tips

Prior to carving, read through all of the directions.

Cuts are easiest when the watermelon is at room temperature. Once your handiwork is complete, chill the carving and contents before serving.

After drawing your design on the rind, insert toothpicks in key places to guide your cuts.

A sharp knife with a pointed tip makes the easiest, cleanest cuts.

Remove excess flesh in large pieces, when possible, to allow for easier melon ball or cube creation.

Use round toothpicks or skewers to attach pieces to your design as flat toothpicks are not strong enough to bear the weight or stand up to the thickness of the rind.

Choosing a Watermelon

With a thick rind covering the fruit inside, you may wonder how to choose the best watermelon at the market. Here are some tips for picking the perfect one:

Look it over. Look for a round, oval or oblong shaped watermelon that is free from bruises, cuts or dents.

Lift it up. The watermelon should be heavy for its size. On average, a 5-pound watermelon yields 15 cups of edible fruit.

Turn it over. The underside of the watermelon should have a creamy yellow spot from where it sat on the ground and ripened in the sun.

hal-easy-art-mummyMummy

Supplies and Tools:

Oval or round seedless watermelon

Cutting board

Kitchen knife

Small bowl

Dry erase marker

Paring knife

Melon baller, fluted or regular

Scoop

Assorted peelers

Cheesecloth

Straight pin

Battery-operated candle or light

Candy eyeballs or blueberries

Wash watermelon under cool running water and pat dry.

On cutting board, place watermelon on its side and use kitchen knife to cut off 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch from bottom (end opposite stem), being careful not to cut too deep into white part of rind.

Cut 1/2-inch to 3/4-inch from stem end to create opening large enough to fit small bowl.

Using dry erase marker, draw eyes, nose and mouth, along with wavy slits around carving to let more light flow through. Use paring knife to cut out design, being sure to cut through to red fruit.

Use fluted or regular melon baller to hollow out inside of watermelon. Use scoop to remove excess watermelon.

Peel green rind off outside of watermelon. (Tip: Different peelers work well for different parts of the watermelon, depending on how flat or round the melon is.)

Wrap thin strips of cheesecloth around mummy carving and secure with straight pin, if needed.

Put battery-operated candle or light into carving. Fit small bowl into top of carving and trim away excess rind to make bowl fit securely. Fill bowl with melon balls and attach candy or blueberries to make eyes.

hal-easy-art-watermelon-pizzaKids Watermelon Pizza Supreme

Servings: 6

1 watermelon slice (8-10 inches around and 1-inch thick), drained

1 cup strawberry preserves

1/2 cup white chocolate chips

1/2 cup raisins

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup sweetened shredded coconuts

Place watermelon slice on serving platter and cut into 6 wedges, leaving in shape of pizza.

Spread preserves over watermelon and sprinkle chocolate chips, raisins, walnuts and coconut.

 

hal-easy-art-watermelon-ballsFrosted, Frozen Watermelon Balls 

Servings: 35-40

1 small watermelon

1 package (3 ounces) watermelon or other red flavor gelatin dessert

Using melon baller, scoop out 35-40 small watermelon balls. Place on paper towels and set aside.

Pour gelatin into shallow bowl. One-by-one, gently drop watermelon balls into bowl, roll around, take out and place on plate covered with paper towel. Repeat until all gelatin is used.

Place plate of frosted watermelon balls in freezer. Allow at least 2 hours to make sure they are completely frozen. Remove from freezer and let sit a few minutes before eating.

Note: To serve with toothpicks, place toothpicks in before freezing to aid in serving.

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Crossfire Harvest Festival

 

Crossfire Church will hold their annual trunk or treat again this year, which they have renamed Harvest Festival.

The event will be held October 31 at the Cedar Rock Sports Plex (4758 Cornfield Drive), from 5-8 p.m.

Crossfire Church started the Halloween alternative in 2012, with dinner, candy and games, and have seen it grow each year. Two years ago they added awards for the candy givers in the categories of creative costumes and decorated vehicles.

Last year they moved it to the Cedar Rock Sports Plex to have enough room for booths, games, inflatables (a bouncy house and obstacle course) and of course, lots of candy.

This year they rebranded Trunk-or-Treat as Harvest Festival, and added an extra hour to present a special kids concert by the Hope Kidz (www.hopekidz.org), and more prizes will be given away.

Two additional churches have joined with Crossfire this year: Bella Vista Church and Rockford United Methodist, along with World Missions, who will have a booth displaying their Talking Bible.

A professional security team will oversee the safety of the evening, although adults will be responsible for the supervision of their own children.

Take your kids, grandkids, and neighbors, and head out on October 31 from 5-8 p.m. to the Cedar Rock Sports for a great time!

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Women’s Club and Rotarians assists with community meal

Members of the Women’s Club and Rotarians helping out with a meal at St. John Paul II Catholic Church. Courtesy photo.

Members of the Women’s Club and Rotarians helping out with a meal at St. John Paul II Catholic Church. Courtesy photo.

Several members of the Cedar Springs Women’s Club recently teamed up with the Cedar Springs Rotarians in providing one of the weekly community meals. These meals are served at St. John Paul II Catholic Church located just west of Meijer on 17 Mile Road in Cedar Springs.

Each Tuesday at 5:00 p.m. the doors are opened by the church for all community members of all ages who want to enjoy a free hearty meal and fellowship. The menu varies each week and is provided by parishioners along with other area churches, youth, and community groups such as the Rotary and Women’s Club.

This week’s group served appetizers of fresh vegetables with cheese and crackers and then lasagna, corn, coleslaw, potato salad, rolls, and dessert. All are welcome at these weekly dinners!

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A Grizzly conversion

 

A priest, a minister, and a rabbi wanted to see who was best at his job. So they each went into the woods, found a bear, and attempted to convert it.

Later they got together. The priest began with his story: “When I found the bear, I read to him from the Catechism and sprinkled him with holy water. Next week is his First Communion.”

“I found a bear by the stream,” said the minister, “and preached God’s holy word. The bear was so mesmerized that he let me baptize him.”

They both looked down at the rabbi, who was lying on a gurney in a body cast. “Looking back,” said the rabbi, “maybe I shouldn’t have started with the circumcision.”

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