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Archive | July, 2016

Julie Ann Balcom

C-obit-Balcom

Julie Ann (Williams) Balcom (50) passed away on June 12, 2016 from heart failure.  She was born September 23, 1965 at Navy Hosp. Paris Island, South Carolina. Preceding her in death was her father Staff Sgt. Roscoe J. Williams USMC, cousin Jonathan C. Landrum, and uncle Calvin Landrum.  Julie is survived by husband L. Charles Balcom; daughter Mary Ann (Eric) Martinez; mother Janet Roemer; sisters Mary (James) Prentice, Minette Merritt, Amy (Michael) Mulcreevy; nephews Roscoe Merritt,  Liam Dykhouse, Clyde Dykhouse, and niece Cliona Mulcreevy. Julie was forever happy and helpful, sometimes teasing her sisters, drawing or playing with her horse (Jack) as a teen.  She rode Jack in many parades where she could make him rear and whistle, which made other horses nervous.  Julie always loved a joke and provoking laughter.  For an art class project Julie and others were each assigned a 6 foot long wall section to create a mural in the elementary school.  Julie chose a Smurf Village with homes, businesses, and people doing all sorts of activities.  In 10th grade she was a Brownie Scout Leader. In her senior year she had a one person art show at a local college and was accepted at Julliard School of the Arts. In order to be closer to home Julie attended Ferris University majoring in commercial art for one year. She then worked at several manufacturing jobs.  As early onset arthritis advanced she moved to California for better weather.  For several years she worked at Woods & Waters Campground as a maintenance person where she enjoyed her talent for fixing things.  Julie injured her back and began working as security guard and care person for the elderly.  Julie enjoyed this job the most, saying, it was the best job she’d ever had. Julie will be greatly missed by her family and dear friends.   A celebration of life was held in the church where Julie loved to sing, with Pastor Mike Murphy and friends at the Aguanga Christian Fellowship Church on June 25, 2016.  A grave side memorial will be held at the family plot, on Aug. 13th at 2 p.m., led by Pastor Jim Barnhart, from Wesley Chapel, Midland, Michigan.   Julie will rest with her grandparents, uncle, and cousin in Middlebranch Township Cemetery, 7 miles West of U.S.10 on East 14 Mile Rd., off of M-66.

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LORETTA BRANHAM

 

C-Obit-BranhamLoretta Branham, age 83, of Gowen passed away unexpectedly at her home on Monday, July 25, 2016. She was born the daughter of Wick & Arlene (Cornett) Sizemore on December 28, 1932 in Kentucky. They along with her husband, Rass Branham and many sisters and brothers have preceded her in death. Loretta is survived by her three daughters, Brenda Craigmyle of Cedar Springs, Tina (Todd) Hansen of Cedar Springs, Teresa Branham of Sevierville, Tennessee; four sons, Marty Jackson of Cedar Springs, Verne (Barb) Branham of Cedar Springs, Tom (Christina) Branham of Grand Haven, Robert Branham of Grand Rapids; brother, Herman (Lee) Sizemore of Florida; twenty one grandchildren; twenty eight great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Loretta was a hard working lady who worked and retired from Dollywood in Tennessee after 10 years. She also retired from C-Tec in Grand Rapids after many years of service. In her spare time she loved crocheting and especially enjoyed working on bed dolls and afghans. She collected cabbage patch dolls and loved to go fishing. Loretta loved her coffee and always insisted everyone stay for at least one cup with her. She was a huge Detroit Tigers fan and loved spending time with her grandchildren and her dog “Dani.” She will be missed dearly by everyone who knew her. Memorial services for Loretta will be held at a later date. Special thanks to Brenda Jackson-Black for supporting the family and all Loretta’s caregivers.

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TIM TOWNS

C-mem-Towns

1947 – 1994

Always thought of and greatly missed.

Family and friends

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Ohio visitors impressed with Cedar Springs family’s hospitality

 

My wife and I, along with my daughter and family, recently vacationed in the Silver Lake region of Michigan. We have heard from others over the years that it was a great place to visit and enjoy. We had no major expectations other than relax and enjoy the beautiful scenery and just go with the flow. Little did we know that we would have an experience that we would all remember for a lifetime.

We had the great fortune to rent a home that was right next door to a family from your area, Kurt and Kathy Gillespie and their children. In one week we were introduced to the dunes in a way that we could never have imagined as Kurt and son Kevin took all of us for rides that we will not ever forget. Their dedication to the sport is apparent and for them to openly share their knowledge and experience, as well as machines, was just incredible. After long days on the dunes, then to invite us to share dinners and campfires at night, just made my family feel so comfortable and at home. Just thought that someone should let you know that you have some wonderful ambassadors for Cedar Springs, Michigan, and Silver Lake dunes, in your midst. And one more thing—we also proved that Wolverines and Buckeyes really do have much more in common than football. Our families together are what it really is all about.

Randy Flowers

Delaware, Ohio

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Drive away distractions to protect teens behind the wheel

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(BPT) – Today’s teens face more distractions than any generation before.

Many don’t recall a time when they were not continuously connected to their friends. Cell phones, which might have been provided as a safety precaution in case Mom or Dad was running late picking them up from school, are now the source of constant messaging, sharing and media consumption.

Teens send texts instead of passing notes in class. They share moments with their peers and the world in the form of photos and short videos. Music, food and transportation can arrive on demand, all with the swipe of a finger. Being away from their phones, even for a short period of time, can even cause a form of separation anxiety expressed in the acronym FOMO (fear of missing out).

So it should come as no surprise that cell phone use is the offense most commonly associated with distracted driving. However, it’s not the only type of distraction.

“A lot of people think they’re better drivers than they actually are, which is why they take unnecessary risks when they’re behind the wheel,” said Randy Petro, chief claims officer for Mercury Insurance. “We see a lot of claims related to distracted driving, including parents turning to scold arguing children, adjusting the infotainment system, and even taking photos while driving. Your first priority once you start piloting any vehicle should be to focus on the task at hand—driving.”

Ten percent of all drivers ages 15 to 19 who were involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA also reports that 660,000 people drive distracted every day.

Teens aren’t the only ones who feel the need to be connected; adults are guilty of it, too.

Many of the teens who are glued to their smartphones have witnessed their parents answering emails at the dinner table or have seen them shoot a “quick text” while driving. Teens have grown up learning that this type of behavior is acceptable and maybe even expected. However, there’s a right time and a right place for everything.

“The first thing parents need to do is practice what they preach. Teenagers won’t always be receptive to ‘because I say so’ or ‘because I’m the adult,’ especially if they witness their parents actively engaging in a behavior they’re being told is bad,” adds Petro. “We as adults need to set a proper example – after all, we do have the advantage of more life experience.”

Parents should set a powerful example by committing not to drive distracted if they want their children to do the same. If necessary, parents can also invest in technology to monitor and disable phones while their teens are driving to eliminate the temptation altogether.

“No Instagram post, bite of a burger or playlist selection is worth someone else’s life. People are mainly in a car to get from point A to point B, and our wish is for them to do it safely,” says Petro.

There are several excellent online resources that provide tips and information to help prepare teens for life behind the wheel, including Mercury Insurance’s Drive Safe Challenge and NHTSA’s Distraction.gov.

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Crash fatalities could drop by half with proven strategies 

 

From the CDC Newsroom

About 90 people die each day from motor vehicle crashes in the United States, resulting in the highest death rate among 19 high-income comparison countries. Our nation has made progress in road safety, reducing crash deaths by 31 percent from 2000 to 2013. But other high-income countries reduced crash deaths even further—by an average of 56 percent during the same period, according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Lower death rates in comparison countries, as well as the high prevalence of risk factors in the U.S., suggest that we can make more progress in saving lives. Compared with other high-income countries, the US had the:

  • most motor vehicle crash deaths per 100,000 population and per 10,000 registered vehicles;
  • second highest percentage of deaths involving alcohol (31 percent); and
  • third lowest front seat belt use (87 percent).

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If the U.S. had the same motor vehicle crash death rate as Belgium—the country with the second highest death rate after the U.S.—about 12,000 fewer lives would have been lost and an estimated $140 million in direct medical costs would have been averted in 2013. And if the U.S. had the same rate as Sweden—the country with the lowest crash death rate—about 24,000 fewer lives would have been lost and an estimated $281 million in direct medical costs would have been averted in 2013.

“It is important to compare us not to our past but to our potential. Seeing that other high-income countries are doing better, we know we can do better too,” said Debra Houry, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “People of our nation deserve better and safer transport.”

For this Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed data compiled by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). CDC determined the number and rate of motor vehicle crash deaths in the U.S. and 19 other high-income countries and reported national seat belt use and percentage of deaths that involved alcohol-impaired driving or speeding, by country, when available. Countries included in the study were Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Each country included in the study was a member of OECD, met the World Bank’s definition for high income, had a population of more than 1 million people, and reported the annual number of motor vehicle deaths and vehicle miles traveled. In addition, the difference between the country-reported motor vehicle crash death rate and the WHO-estimated rate could not exceed 1 death per 100,000 population.

“It’s unacceptable for 90 people to die on our roads each day, especially when we know what works to prevent crashes, injuries, and deaths,” said Erin Sauber-Schatz, Ph.D., M.P.H., transportation safety team lead, CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “About 3,000 lives could be saved each year by increasing seat belt use to 100 percent, and up to 10,000 lives could be saved each year by eliminating alcohol-impaired driving.”

The researchers recommend using seat belts in both front and rear seats, properly using car seats and booster seats for children through at least age 8, never drinking and driving, obeying speed limits, and eliminating distracted driving. In addition, states can use proven strategies to support these actions that save lives, prevent injuries, and avert crash-related costs. (See the proven strategies at http://www.cdc.gov/psr/national-summary/mvi.html.)

CDC’s Injury Center works to protect the safety of all Americans, every day. For more information about motor vehicle safety, please visit www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety.

For this Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed data compiled by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). CDC determined the number and rate of motor vehicle crash deaths in the U.S. and 19 other high-income countries and reported national seat belt use and percentage of deaths that involved alcohol-impaired driving or speeding, by country, when available. Countries included in the study were Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

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What does the fox…eat?

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By David A Kieft, Howard Christensen Nature Center

I suppose the fox eats whatever he wants to eat, when it’s available. But that is indeed just the simple answer. As a child I was always outdoors, something I know my own daughter cannot say nearly enough. As I spent time outdoors, I learned things that aren’t often “well known” facts about our wildlife, habitats, plants and the multiple ecosystems we have in Michigan.

I grew up in Jenison with gravel pits (and an abundance of wild nature) right in my backyard. It was here, in my adolescent traipsing, that I learned such useless facts as: groundhogs can climb trees; Blandings turtles use their yellow necks to attract insects for lunch; goldfish can survive in Michigan’s waters; I can’t swim against the current of the Grand River; and the Eastern Hognose snake backs down when you call his bluff. At the family cottage near Baldwin, I continued learning about animals like Purple Martins, Red Head Woodpeckers and yep, more snakes. I would spend every waking minute outdoors (or reading about it when Mom wouldn’t let me out) and to this day my favorite thing to do when I’m not cooking or sitting at my HCNC desk is to get outside and continue learning (mostly about snakes because they are awesome).

But it also saddens me that in today’s day in age, less than 35 years from my good ol’ days, we have seen a shift in the characteristics of youth; liability seems to be a hot topic for businesses like gravel pits; and parents guard their children ever more. One can no longer roam the gravel mines; after hours problems have shut parks down earlier; funding has closed some of the greatest places we’ve known as kids ourselves; and parents feel safer with their kids at home more (even I can attest to that). But, that is where Howard Christensen Nature Center comes in.

OUT-Nature-center2Now, I may be biased, but hear me out. HCNC has been no exception to the current times, as a not for profit, we too struggle with funding and after hours problems. But our first priority is to get people outdoors more, to learn, to teach and enjoy. Did you know that our weekly Wild Wednesday programs offer-learning experiences that will enhance your child’s senses, interest and knowledge of the wild world around us? Were you aware that once a month we host family friendly programs that aren’t always “nature oriented” but are still designed to get you out? Have you heard that a walk in the woods can ease anxiety and stress? Did you know that even though I keep bees I am deathly afraid of insects in general? If you answered no to any of the above, the answers await you at HCNC. If you think you are too old for Wild Wednesdays, check out “Mom’s Night Out” where we make a few premade frozen meals to lighten your schedule at home or simply stop in and take a walk on some of our dozen miles of trails, visit me during the day and ask to see my bees! There are so many things to do at Howard Christensen that I cannot share them all here, but I urge you, beg you even, to come out and visit; buy a membership and visit often or bring your young ones to a day camp.

Here are some pictures from a couple of our recent day camps that show the joy on the faces of those who get out to learn and enjoy nature at HCNC. Ask them, I’ll bet they know what the fox eats!

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The Trumpeter Swan 

 

July’s Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial featured bird

OUT-TrumpeterSwan“To form a perfect conception of the beauty and elegance of these Swans, you must observe them when they are not aware of your proximity, and as they glide over the waters of some secluded inland pond. On such occasions, the neck, which at other times is held stiffly upright, moves in graceful curves, now bent forward, now inclined backwards over the body. Now with an extended scooping movement the head becomes immersed for a moment, and with a sudden effort a flood of water is thrown over the back and wings, when it is seen rolling off in sparkling globules, like so many large pearls. The bird then shakes its wings, beats the water, and as if giddy with delight shoots away, gliding over and beneath the surface of the liquid element with surprising agility and grace. Imagine, reader, that a flock of fifty Swans are thus sporting before you, as they have more than once been in my sight, and you will feel, as I have felt, more happy and void of care than I can describe.”

More than 150 years ago, John James Audubon wrote this about the awe inspired by watching trumpeter swans as they go about their business, untroubled by the doings of humans. Thanks to the determined efforts of conservationists across North America, these impressive birds will continue to mesmerize future generations.

Early settlers and explorers in Michigan noted that trumpeter swans were found here in abundance. Starting in the late 1800s, however, an increase in European settlement brought with it the conversion of wetlands to farmlands. It also brought market hunters, who harvested swans to sell their meat to restaurants, fluffy down for pillows, feather quills for pens, and skins and feathers for the fashion and hat trade. Unlike today’s hunters, who provide conservation funding through their hunting license and equipment purchases and only take as many animals as can be replaced through reproduction, market hunters had few regulations and little care for ensuring the future of the species that they decimated.

Thanks to the passage of federal wildlife protection laws in the early 1900s, this unrestrained harvest was curtailed, but the bird’s habitat still was imperiled. By 1933, only 66 trumpeter swans remained in the United States; mostly in remote areas of the Rocky Mountains and Alaska. The tide began to turn for trumpeter swans in the 1930s, when the Red Rocks Lake National Wildlife Refuge was created to protect the swans around the Rocky Mountains and hunters rallied for additional hunting fees to protect and restore America’s wetlands.

Through careful stewardship, the trumpeter’s numbers slowly increased until wildlife biologists were able to collect limited numbers of swan eggs from the wild to be added to eggs collected from zoos, which were hatched and raised for release into the wild in Michigan. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, these birds were raised until they were two years old and then released in high-quality wetlands around the state. Today, over 750 trumpeter swans can be found in Michigan alone and 35,000 swans across the entire United States!

If you venture out to capture the magic that Audubon experienced in the presence of trumpeter swans, be sure to know your quarry. These are the largest waterfowl in the world and can weigh more than 25 pounds. They are 4 feet tall and have a wingspan of over 7 feet; all in all, an intimidating bird. Don’t fear, though, since trumpeter swans are generally shy around people. They even avoid nesting on lakes with a lot of people swimming, boating and fishing. But beware around a swan family—adults are very protective of their young cygnets and may attempt to chase off or attack a person that they think may pose a danger. A canny explorer will know to look for nests atop muskrat lodges on quiet lakes or marshes and will come armed with binoculars and patience.

Today’s conservation challenge for the trumpeter swan is competing with people and the non-native mute swan to find homes to raise the next generation of trumpeters. Lakefront property is highly valued for residential development, and this increased human use may drive off nesting swans. Mute swans, imported from Europe in the 1800s, use the same types of habitats as trumpeter swans and tend to be more aggressive than trumpeters, pushing out our native swan.

When you visit a lake where you see trumpeter swans, respect their privacy and enjoy them from a distance. Try to limit loud and fast recreational activity around trumpeter swans and their nests, and encourage others to do so as well. If you see mute swans on a lake where you live, contact the DNR to find out what can be done to remove this invasive species and help native wildlife. With wise stewardship, we’ll be able to hear the trumpet of the swan for years to come.

The trumpeter swan remains in Michigan year-round; however, is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The year 2016 marks the centennial of the Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds (also called the Migratory Bird Treaty), signed on Aug. 16, 1916. Three other treaties were signed shortly thereafter with Japan, Russia and Mexico. The Migratory Bird Treaty, the three other treaties signed later, and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act form the cornerstones of efforts to conserve birds that migrate across international borders.

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Ant stories

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Ant stories abound. Some are good and then there are others. I hope children still watch ants carrying sand grains and sticks as they tend to their house keeping. It was always interesting to watch ants march one by one in a long row carrying food bits to the nest while others walked in the opposite direction to a food source that an ant found and trail marked.

The ant finding a food source laid a trail of pheromones for ants to follow and a great chain of ants began work. I’ve watched them walking over cement following an invisible trail. I rubbed a finger across the trail about three inches wide. It removed the trail scent. On both sides of the rub, the ants came to a stop and did not know where to go. They piled in mass about three inches apart.

After I watched and waited for about 30 minutes, an ant found a way to reconnect their road. The new trail was about three feet long instead of three inches. It made a big loop like a bypass we might encounter when a road is closed for repair. One would think they would have found a short route but they did not. I had read about pheromone marked trails and wanted to verify it. Science requires observation that is repeatable with verifiable physical evidence. I do not need to personally conduct every science experiment to accept it but some are great learning experiences. When food is depleted, the ants cease placing pheromone drops on the trail. It evaporates and the trail is abandoned.

It was sad for a beetle when a group of ants discovered it for a meal. I was tempted to save the beetle by shooing ants and moving the beetle to safety. Instead, I allowed the ants to continue their predatory role. The beetle fought for its life as long as it could but the ants chewed off its legs. Once the beetle could not move, ants proceeded to kill it for a hearty meal. I suppose it is like humans fishing, hunting birds, mammals, or slaughtering cows and pigs for our sustenance.

Our daughters were raised to respect life and to avoid causing needless or cruel harm or death. When Jenny Jo was in second grade, she told her teacher that kids were stepping on ants and killing them in the playground. The teacher acknowledged but did nothing until she realized how traumatic it was to Jenny Jo and decided to stop the students from needlessly killing ants going about their daily work. It was new experience for the teacher to encounter someone valuing ant lives.

We each raise our children with different values regarding a “Reverence for Life.” There are times when it is appropriate to kill insects and times when we should not. I have written about the importance of insects as pollinators, predators of other insects, and their importance for maintaining healthy ecosystems. Many kinds of butterfly caterpillars require ants for protection in order to survive to the winged adult form. The Endangered Karner Blue butterfly in our region is one example. In Karner Blue habitat one will find large ant mounds and without the ants, their survival would be greatly reduced.

Preventing ants from causing houses to collapse is important. Carpenter ants found our home and began hollowing support beams. That was unacceptable and we hired a treatment company to save the house.

Most insect activity provides direct or indirect benefit for society. We should make intelligent decisions to live with most insects. They do not know the difference between carrying food they found, a hapless beetle, or beams in a house. We can selectively control problem ants to protect our homes. Value ant roles in nature niches and support life when reasonable. Spend time outdoors with family members to discover the biodiversity of life sharing our yards and encourage a reverence for life.

Few wildlife are harmful to us or property so I suggest we do not to use excessive control, pesticides, or herbicides that kill the approximate 99 percent that are beneficial. Selectively target the 1 percent causing damage.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Beets 

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By Judy Reed

Many of us here in Michigan grew up loving (or hating) beets. And usually, we only had them one of two ways—either boiled or pickled. Michigan-grown beets are available late July to late October, so now is a good time to try out some new ways to cook and eat them. You can grill or roast beets, eat them in salads, include them in smoothies, or even desserts such as brownies or cupcakes. Now that’s a versatile vegetable!

Nutrition

Beets are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. They are also a good source of Vitamin C, Iron and Magnesium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Folate, Potassium and Manganese. One cup of beets is 58 calories, and provides 4g of fiber, 2g of protein, 9g of sugar, and 13g of carbohydrates. The glycemic load is a 5, if you use that scale.

Storage and food safety 

The Michigan State University Extension website recommends the following for handling and storing fresh beets:

  • Avoid using large beets as they can be tough and woody.
  • Wash hands before and after handling fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Wash beets thoroughly under cool running water. Do not use soap.
  • Keep beets away from raw meats and meat juice to prevent cross contamination.
  • Before storing, trim the stem to 2 inches above the beet. Do not trim the tail.
  • Store beets in a plastic bag in the refrigerator at or below 41 °F for 7 to 10 days.
  • Beets may be frozen for up to ten months.
  • For best quality and nutritive value, preserve only what your family can consume in 12 months.

See the recipe below from about.com on how to grill beets, and another recipe that should be close to the hearts of those in Cedar Springs—Red Flannel Hash, from Eatingwell.com.

How to Grill Beets

Estimate 1 small to medium beet per person and get grilling.

Heat the grill to medium-hot (you should be able to hold your hand about an inch over the cooking grate for about 2 seconds).

Meanwhile, peel and slice the beets.

Brush the beets with olive oil or vegetable oil. Sprinkle them lightly with salt.

Place the beets on the grill. If using a gas grill, close the cover. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, turn, and continue cooking until the beets are tender and grill-marked, another 8 to 10 minutes.

Serve the beets hot, warm, or at room temperature. Drizzle them with additional olive oil for serving, if you like. This is also a great time to use any nut oils (toasted walnut oil or hazelnut oil in particular), since they so perfectly complement the earthy-yet-sweet flavor of grilled beets.

BLOOM-Beets-Red-Flannel-HashRed Flannel Hash (from eatingwell.com)

Makes: 4 servings

Serving Size: 1 cup

Active Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

2 cups diced peeled beets (1/2 inch; about 2 medium)

2 cups diced russet potatoes (1/2 inch)

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

1 cup diced fennel bulb plus 1/4 cup chopped fronds for garnish

1 cup diced shallots

1 large clove garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

Preparation

Bring about 1 inch of water to a boil in a large saucepan fitted with a steamer basket. Add beets, cover and steam for 4 minutes. Add potatoes, cover and steam until just tender, 5 to 7 minutes more.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large cast-iron or nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add diced fennel and shallots; cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 4 to 6 minutes. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the steamed vegetables; cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are starting to brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in salt and pepper and fennel fronds, if using.

Nutrition

Per serving: 189 calories; 7 g fat (1 g sat, 5 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 8 g total sugars; 4 g protein; 5 g fiber; 364 mg sodium; 762 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Folate (26% daily value), Vitamin C (23% dv), Potassium (22% dv).

Carbohydrate Servings: 2

Exchanges: 1 starch, 3 vegetable, 1 1/2 fat

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