web analytics

Archive | June, 2016

Register to vote in August primary by July 5

 

Residents will vote on several issues in the Tuesday, August 2 primary, including state and township representatives, Kent County Sheriff, Prosecuting Attorney, County Clerk, Treasurer, Drain Commissioner, County Commissioner, Delegates to political conventions, Circuit Court Judge, and various millage proposals (depending on your township).

People who aren’t registered to vote have until Tuesday, July 5 to register at any Secretary of State office, or at their county or local clerk’s office.

Check your registration status at the Michigan Voter Information Center at www.Michigan.gov/vote.

You also can view your sample ballot if your community is holding an election as well as find your polling location and track your absentee ballot.

How you can get an absentee ballot

Voters who qualify may choose to cast an absentee ballot. As a registered voter, you may obtain an absentee ballot if you are:

  • Age 60 or older.
  • Physically unable to attend the polls without the assistance of another.
  • Expecting to be absent from the community in which you are registered for the entire time the polls will be open on Election Day.
  • In jail awaiting arraignment or trial.
  • Unable to attend the polls due to religious reasons.
  • Appointed to work as an election inspector in a precinct outside of your precinct of residence.

Those who wish to receive an absentee ballot by mail must submit the application by 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30.

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Dale G. Anderson

C-OBIT-andersonDale G. Anderson, 62 of Cedar Springs, died Tuesday, June 28, 2016 doing what he loved, riding his motorcycle. Dale was born July 27, 1953 in Chicago, IL the son of Richard and Marion (Pyne) Anderson. He was a truss assembler for 43 years. Dale was a stubborn, rough neck, loving and caring biker. He so loved his granddaughters that he had their names tattooed on his arm. Surviving are his wife of 38 years, Elaine; daughter, Lacey (Nathan) Wright; grandchildren, Kayda, Avalon, Harlynn; mother, Marion Anderson; brother, Raymond Anderson; sister-in-law, Donna (Robert) Greenland; five nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father and parents-in-law. A memorial gathering will be held Sunday, July 10 at 1 pm at Morley Park, Cedar Springs. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Kent County.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs.

 

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

LILA MAE WOODHULL

LILA MAE WOODHULL

June 28, 1915 – July 2, 2001

Gone are the days we used to share,

but in our hearts, you are always there.

Love always,

Gary and Barb Woodhull

Larry Woodhull

Grandchildren and great-grandchildren

Posted in MemorialComments (0)

GWENDOLYN CLAIRE PERRY

 

26C-obit-PerryGwendolyn Claire Perry, 88, of Cedar Springs, passed away Tuesday, June 28, 2016 and went to be with her Lord and Savior. Mrs. Perry was born November 5, 1927 in Hamilton, Canada the eldest daughter of Rev. Alfred Clare and Edna (Jefferson) Motyer. She was preceded in death by a brother and his wife, Derwin (Imogene) Motyer; son, Lee Perry; granddaughter, Emily Perry; brother-in-law, Douglas Ehman. Surviving are her husband, Lyle Perry Jr. whom she married in 1949; children, Lyle III (Ellen) Perry, Lizabeth (Dennis) Boe, Lenn Perry, and Lonn (Ruth) Perry; grandchildren, Jessamine (Dustin) Spulak, Max and Chace Perry, Johannes (Elizabeth) Boe, Nicholas (Desi) Boe and Suzy (Jared) Goulart, Aaron (Rachael) Perry, Joseph Perry, and Nathaniel Perry; great-grandchildren, Kalysta and Jaiden Vorase, Ailie Biddle, Braxton Perry, Ole and Thorren Boe, Dodger Boe, Lilija and Annika Goulart; sister, Shirley Ehman; several cousins, nieces nephews and friends. Mrs. Perry graduated from Howard City H.S. and from Bronson Methodist Hospital School of Nursing in Kalamazoo, Michigan. As a Registered Nurse she practiced her profession at the State Hospital in Kalamazoo and in hospitals in Plainwell, Lakeview, Greenville, and Blodgett Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She was a member of the Howard City Methodist Church, later attended St. Thomas Lutheran Church in Trufant, Michigan and then became a member of the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church. She was formerly a Brownie Scout Leader, President of the Cedar Springs Women’s Club, and a President of the Cedar Springs H.S. Band Boosters. She regularly attended the alumni reunions of the Howard City H.S. and of Bronson Methodist Hospital School of Nursing. She enjoyed attending meetings of the Cedar Springs City Council, and often contributed comments and opinions during council meetings. She enjoyed her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She took occasional trips to Canada to visit a favorite uncle, Selby Douglas Jefferson and to greet relatives and friends there. Being born in Canada, she had warm feelings toward anything English or British. She became a citizen of the USA in September 1941. The family will greet friends Friday from 6-8 pm at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The service will be Saturday 10:00 a.m. at the United Methodist Church, Cedar Springs. Pastor Steve Lindeman officiating. Interment Reynolds Township Cemetery, Howard City. Memorial contributions may be made to the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

ALTHEA CHRISTINE SWIFT

 

26C--obit-SwiftAlthea Christine Swift passed in her sleep early on the morning of June 25, 2016, and has gone to be with her Heavenly Father. She was born on August 9, 1923, to John V. Johnson and Nora Carlson Johnson and graduated from Kent City High School. She was confirmed in Mamrelund Lutheran Church in Kent City and was a devoted lifelong member of that congregation. In the 1940s, she worked as a telephone operator at Michigan Bell Telephone Company. In 1950, she and her husband Leon Swift bought their farm on Swift Street in Cedar Springs (Courtland Township) and built their family and business together there. She was preceded in death by her husband; her brothers Edwin and Arnold; her sister Norma; and her daughter-in-law Dawn Feikema Swift. She is survived by her sister Imogene (Gene); her sons Roger and Lawrence David “Larry” Swift; her grandchildren Jon, Katie, Elisabeth, Travis and Tyler Swift, as well as many nephews and nieces, their children, numerous cousins and many dear friends. Visitation was on Monday, June 27, 2016 from 5:00 until 8:00 p.m. at Pederson Funeral Home, 127 N. Monroe Street NE, Rockford, MI 49341. Funeral Service was held on Tuesday, June 28, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. at Mamrelund Lutheran Church, 4085 Lutheran Church Road, Kent City, MI 49330. Pastor Leonard Dahlgren officiating. An additional visitation was held at the church for the hour prior to the service. Interment in Courtland Cemetery, after which, there was a luncheon at the Courtland Methodist Church, across from the cemetery.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

For those eligible, voting should be easy

 

V-Lee-Hamilton

By Lee H. Hamilton

The elections process is not usually grist for inflammatory rhetoric. But this year has been different. Republican Donald Trump labeled the GOP primary process “crooked.” Democrat Bernie Sanders suggested his party’s use of super-delegates made its nominating process a “rigged system.” For many voters, the intricacies of voting rules quickly became a topic of overriding interest.

Now that the primaries are over, I hope Americans remain just as intrigued by the laws governing general-election voting in their states. Because at the moment, this country is engaged in an experiment with the democratic process that should rivet everyone who cares about representative government.

We’ve seen two diverging trends in the states in recent years. One approach has sought to make voting more difficult. Since the 2010 elections, 22 states have put laws in place narrowing voters’ ability to go to the polls. They have decreased the time allotted for voting; added tough ID requirements; reduced options for voting prior to Election Day; added proof-of-citizenship requirements; and made it necessary for voters to register well before election day. These steps, their backers contend, are necessary to guard against voter fraud and assure the integrity of the ballot.

Other states have moved in the opposite direction. They’ve made it easier to register to vote; have added longer hours for voting on election day; have moved to mail-in ballots; and encourage early voting. They’ve done all they can to make the process of voting simple and convenient.

On the whole, Republicans at the state level have favored greater restrictiveness and Democrats greater ease, but you don’t have to be a partisan of one side or the other to recognize that politicians believe a great deal is at stake. Whatever they give as their reasons for pushing a particular approach, you can be sure they are also calculating the effect of rules changes on the outcome of elections, and they’ll do all they can to tilt the rules in their favor.

Which is why the question of how to approach the right to vote isn’t going to be settled any time soon. There are a lot of court cases pending in the various states, and it’s likely there will be conflicting judicial opinions.

If we’re going to debate the electoral process as a nation, let’s keep in mind the core issue: it should be easy to vote—and hard to cheat. Casting your ballot is a fundamental constitutional right, and ensuring that every eligible voter can do so is basic to our system. Every American should be able to exercise his or her right to vote without feeling cowed—which is why I worry that efforts to limit voting will have a pernicious effect on our system of representative government.

The evidence on this is mixed. A recent paper by political scientists at UC San Diego analyzing turnout between 2008 and 2012 in states with strict voter ID laws found that they depressed voting overall—more among Democratic constituencies, but among Republicans, too. Yet recent research also suggests that the opposite is not true: easing voting rules in states that never tightened them does not necessarily boost turnout.

One certainty in all this is that a lot of people who are eligible to vote for various reasons do not choose to do so. Of the 219 million Americans eligible to vote in 2014, the Census Bureau reported last year, roughly 41 million were not registered; and turnout in actual elections is even lower. Voting behavior may be more related to motivation than it is to statutory activity.

A more pressing certainty is that our entire voting system needs attention. All too many jurisdictions try to run elections on the cheap, with machinery and processes that are inadequate to the task. Even now, 16 years after the 2000 presidential election revealed deep flaws in the patchwork of ways we record and tally votes, the system remains rickety.

“The vigor of American democracy rests on the vote of each citizen,” a national commission on voting once wrote. Keep that in mind this election year — and pay attention to how your state approaches its obligation to safeguard that vigor.

Lee Hamilton is a Senior Advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. For information about our educational resources and programs, visit our website at www.centeroncongress.org. “Like” us on Facebook at “Indiana University Center on Representative Government.”

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Creative ways to use fresh, summer ingredients

Summer’s flavors can be fleeting, so make culinary creations count by using the freshest ingredients in new ways.

Summer’s flavors can be fleeting, so make culinary creations count by using the freshest ingredients in new ways.

(StatePoint) In summer, the abundance of fresh ingredients can be overwhelming, especially if you stick to the same old recipes. Make more of the fresh produce available to you at the grocer, farmers market and even your own garden, by thinking creatively.

To help, the summer food experts at Betty Crocker are offering some great ideas for using fresh, seasonal produce.

1. Save the best berries for later.

Berry season is far too short. Make it last longer by freezing berries for the cooler months. Choose fruit at peak freshness, and then store it in high-quality freezer bags that seal tightly, removing as much excess air — fruit’s worst enemy — as possible before freezing. Label bags with the freeze date and remember: a full freezer is more efficient, so stock up!

2. Take advantage of fresh tomatoes.

If you have more fresh tomatoes than you know what to do with, consider these creative uses:

  • Caprese Salad. Layer sliced tomatoes, fresh mozzarella slices and basil. Drizzle with olive oil and a good balsamic vinegar. Sprinkle with salt and serve.
  • Bruschetta. Served on small slices of toasted bread, bruschetta is a perfect appetizer for any dinner party.
  • No-Cook Pasta Sauce. Marinara sauce can be too heavy for summer, but a raw sauce showcasing fresh tomatoes is perfect. Try Rigatoni and Tomatoes for a great introduction.

3. Add a touch of sweetness to zucchini.

Managing the bounty of garden-fresh zucchini is always a challenge, so think beyond the main course. You can make the most out of the humble summer squash with baked treats like pineapple zucchini bread, zucchini bars and chocolate zucchini snack cake.

4. Bake with fresh berries.

Baking with fresh berries is one of the highlights of summertime. Favorite desserts that call for freshly picked strawberries, raspberries and blueberries include classics like fresh strawberry pie, but also inventive creations like brownies and berries dessert pizza and blueberry cheesecake bars.

5. Make pickles easy.

Preserving the summer bounty of cucumbers doesn’t mean you need to spend days canning. For a tasty shortcut, layer cucumber slices, onions and carrots in a glass container. Mix with sugar, vinegar, salt and dill weed. Cover and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, but no longer than two weeks.

6. Make berries last with freezer jam.

Freezer jam is a smart way to hold on to summer’s fresh berries without the hassle of traditional jam. Try this recipe for Strawberry Freezer Jam:

Mash 4 cups strawberries, until slightly chunky, to make 2 cups. Mix with 4 cups sugar in large bowl. Let stand at room temperature 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mix 3/4 cup water and one package powdered fruit pectin in 1-quart saucepan. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Boil and stir one minute. Pour hot pectin mixture over strawberry mixture; stir constantly three minutes. Immediately spoon mixture into freezer containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe rims of containers; seal. Let stand at room temperature about 24 hours or until set. Store in freezer up to six months. Thaw and stir before serving.

More seasonal recipes and summer cooking tips can be found at BettyCrocker.com/summerfoods.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)

Design an outdoor room for all to enjoy 

 

Creating an outdoor garden room can be accomplished even with limited space and budget. Photo credit: Gardener’s Supply Company

Creating an outdoor garden room can be accomplished even with limited space and budget. Photo credit: Gardener’s Supply Company

By Melinda Myers

No matter your budget, space or gardening experience, you can design an outdoor entertainment area for you, your family and friends to enjoy.

Start by gathering ideas from magazines, the internet and websites like Gardener’s Supply Company for examples of outdoor garden spaces.

Next, select an area that is convenient and suitable for your outdoor entertaining. Define the space using outdoor rugs and furniture or tall planters (gardeners.com) to serve as the walls for your garden room. A bistro set and a couple of chairs makes for an intimate space on a balcony. Those with more room may want to include an outdoor wicker and teak dining set. Fill the planters with ornamental grasses, papyrus, cannas and other flowering plants to create a living screen.

Add a splash of color and flavor to the space by growing herbs and vegetables combined with flowers in these and additional planters in your garden space. Include ingredients for your favorite drinks, appetizers and meals. Your guests will enjoy plucking a few mint leaves for their iced tea or mojito, harvesting fresh greens from a Salad Garden Bar and dressing up the meal with a few pesticide-free edible flowers like nasturtiums, calendula and daylilies.

Busy gardeners and those that travel may want to try self-watering pots. These containers have built-in water reservoirs to provide a constant flow of water to the plants. This means you need to water less often, while still enjoying healthy and productive plants.

Add some height and focal points with topiaries.  Purchase a sculpted evergreen or train vines up a twist topiary frame to create a bit of living art. And don’t forget to add some garden art and statuary.

Extend your enjoyment with outdoor lighting. A few votive candles in old punch cups are perfect for intimate gatherings in small spaces. Add a bit more illumination with the help of solar illuminated planters, solar deck lights, post caps, and solar cubes and spheres. No buried electric lines or extension cords needed. Use these lights to lead you down the path to your garden space or brighten the space for an evening of fun.

So get busy creating the garden room of your dreams. Once you get started, you will be looking for more opportunities for that quiet getaway, outdoor kitchen and more ways to enjoy your garden.

Gardening expert Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone” DVD set, and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment TV & radio segments. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. Myers’ website is www.melindamyers.com.

Posted in NewsComments (0)

West Michigan Hawks win big again 

S-West-Mich-hawks-vs-grizzlies

Improve to 4-0

By Shae Brophy

Saturday evening, the Hawks paid a visit to Vicksburg High School to square off with the Kalamazoo Grizzlies. After a 50-8 Hawks victory in the first matchup of the season, the Hawks took the field with plenty of confidence. Considering that the Grizzlies also guaranteed a victory this time around, the Hawks used the word “guarantee” as the mantra for this game.

After a bit of a sluggish start, the Hawks took a 3-0 lead on a 38-yard field goal by kicker Jacob Hardy. That score held until the end of the first quarter. Early in the second quarter, running back Eric Woodfork took a 15-yard run to the house for a touchdown, improving the score to 9-0. Wide receiver Monta Swanigan added to the lead later in the quarter with a 17-yard receiving touchdown, giving the Hawks a 15-0 lead at the half.

Quarterback Charles Manny Hodges rumbled his way into the end zone in the third quarter on a one-yard quarterback keeper, extending the lead to 21-0. The Grizzlies found the end zone for the only time of the evening on their next drive, returning an interception for a touchdown. After three quarters, the Hawks held a 21-6 lead.

The Hawks put the pedal to the medal in the fourth quarter. Swanigan pulled in his second touchdown of the game, a 22-yard pass, early in the quarter. Defensive end Rick Loper found the end zone after returning an interception the distance for a touchdown, and Swanigan scored his third touchdown of the game on the next Hawks possession. The Hawks’ defense also recorded a safety in the quarter. When all was said and done, the Hawks brought home a 45-6 victory.

Chaz Watford had an impressive day defensively, pulling in two interceptions, as well as breaking up another pass. In total, the Hawks forced seven turnovers (two interceptions for Watford, Loper interception, Court McSwain interception, Darnell Madison interception, Javon Welch interception, Nick Steimel interception), while they also had six turnovers of their own.

It was just another day at the office for Swanigan, who ripped off his second consecutive game with three receiving touchdowns.

Although West Michigan won big on the scoreboard, the Hawks were penalized for a total of 150 yards, including six personal foul penalties.

“We played a solid game,” said head coach David Lange. “We got off to a slow start, which has become somewhat of a trend, and is something that we need to work on. We also need to work on our consistency, but in the end, it’s hard to be too upset about a 45-6 victory.”

With the victory, the Hawks are now the only undefeated team remaining in the Minor Leauge Football Alliance’s “Big Eight” division.

The Hawks will enjoy the holiday weekend with a bye week, and will be in action again on July 9, when they make the trip to Battle Creek for a tilt with the Coyotes.

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

Meet the Hawks: Ryan Williams

 

Ryan Williams

Ryan Williams

By Shae Brophy

Meet West Michigan Hawks safety/kick returner Ryan Williams. Originally from Muskegon, Michigan, Williams graduated from Muskegon High School in 2012. This is his fourth season playing in the semi-pro football ranks.

One of his biggest role models is Martin Luther King Jr. “I look up to historical figures who did more than just talk,” said Williams. When he isn’t on the field for the Hawks, Williams enjoys playing basketball and flag football.

“Ryan is an incredible safety,” said head coach/owner David Lange. “He is a huge asset for the defense, and a big contributor towards the overall success of our defense. His explosive speed is tackle breaking ability is a big reason as to why he has success returning punts and kickoffs.”

Like a lot of his teammates, Williams heard big things about the Hawks and was hopeful to be a part of the team. “I heard about the team and the things they do, and wanted to give it a try. I liked what I saw,” he said. “I also love that Coach Lange wants everyone to get involved with the community. It’s a good feeling to know that we have created a fan base for the team, as well.”

Williams and the Hawks will enjoy a bye week over the holiday weekend, and will be back in action on July 9th when they travel to face the Battle Creek Coyotes.

Posted in SportsComments (0)

advert
Advertising Rates Brochure
Kent Theatre

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!