web analytics

Categorized | News

Restoring wetlands can put cash in your pocket

 

Do you own property that was historically wet but the natural drainage has been altered by the installation of ditches or agricultural drain tiles?

Do you own marginal agricultural land that is often difficult to plant in the spring or harvest in the fall because of wetness?

Are you interested in receiving technical assistance and cost-share money to improve wildlife habitat on your property by restoring wetlands?

You could be eligible to receive between $2,000-$5,000/acre for land that is restored to a wetland and protected with a conservation easement!

The Rogue River Watershed Partners and Trout Unlimited will be hosting a free wetland workshop for landowners at Rockford Brewing Company on Tuesday, April 26 from 6:00-7:30pm.  The workshop will highlight programs that assist private landowners to restore historic wetlands on their properties. Landowners that meet federal requirements may be eligible for wetland restoration payments that pay between $2,000-$5,000 per acre in Kent, Newaygo, and Ottawa Counties.

Hear from leading wetland experts, including representatives from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

If you have an interest in restoring wetland habitat on your property, this is the free workshop for you!

Why are wetlands necessary?

Wetlands provide a multitude of ecological, economic and social benefits. They provide habitat for fish, wildlife and a variety of plants. Wetlands are also important landscape features because they hold and slowly release floodwater and snow melt, and recharge groundwater.  This combined action of slowing and storing water reduces flooding downstream and shoreline erosion. Flooding and high flows in local rivers are becoming worse with increased development pressures, which add impervious surfaces, such as driveways and roads, which do not absorb rainfall.

Wetlands also act as filters to cleanse water of impurities, such as sediment and nutrients. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus contribute a large amount of pollution to Michigan’s lakes, river, and streams. Excess nutrients contribute to increased algae growth, which reduces the amount of oxygen in the water. Wetlands can filter out as much as 91 percent of the phosphorus and 86 percent of the nitrogen. Sediment (soil particles) is the leading non-point source pollutant in Michigan’s lakes, rivers and streams. Sediments that are suspended in running water can also be removed by wetlands. As the running water enters a wetland, the water slows and the sediments settle out. Some wetlands can retain as much as 94 percent of this sediment.

This post was written by:

- who has written 17604 posts on Cedar Springs Post Newspaper.


Contact the author

Comments are closed.

advert
Dewys Manufacturing
Kent County Credit Union
Advertising Rates Brochure
Ray Winnie

Archives

Get Your Copy of The Cedar Springs Post for just $40 a year!