web analytics

Archive | January, 2016

DONALD WHITE

EPSON scanner image

Donald White, age 95, of Cedar Springs, passed from this life on Monday, January 25, 2016. Don was born in Montcalm County, Michigan on August 9, 1920 to Vern and Hazel (Rogers) White. At a young age Don and his family moved to Ensley Center where Don was raised. On September 19, 1941 Don married the girl of his dreams, Audrey Brownell. The couple resided on a farm in Courtland Township for 71 years until Audrey passed on February 2, 2013. Don White was a horse man. There was a sign in front of their home that said, “Horses for sale, by Don White.” Don farmed his land almost to entirety with horses, only using a tractor to run the belts of the thrashing machine. Don traveled the state with his wagon and team of horses, appearing in various parades, but most notably the Red Flannel Parade in Cedar Springs. For many years Don and Audrey were members of the Draft Horse Club that met in Blanchard, Michigan. Don was preceded in death by his parents; his loving wife; his granddaughter, Kelly Jean Brophy; seven brothers, Ben, Wayne, Roy, Alton, Floyd, Alvin and Bernard White; four sisters, Mildred Barnes, Frances Johnson, Pauline Rebecca White and Virginia Reed. He is survived by his three children, Suzanne (Jennings) Johnson, Bonnie (Tom) Reynolds and Donald White, Jr. and special friend, Judy Sailor; his grandchildren, Scott (Michele) Johnson, Brian (Julie) Johnson, Mark (Veronica) Allen, Julie Anne Johnson, Jason Van’thof, Molly Goodman, Jordan White, Rebecca Reynolds and Thomas Louis (Audrey) Reynolds Jr.; 26 great-grandchildren; 10 great-great-grandchildren. Don is also survived by his brother, Robert White; his sisters-in-law, Stella White, Hattie White, Yvonne White, Esther White, and Yvonne Brownell Hendrick and many nieces and nephews. The family greeted friends Wednesday January 27 at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The Service of Praise and Thanksgiving for the gift of eternal life through Jesus Christ will be held Thursday 11:00 am at The Springs Church, 135 N. Grant St., Cedar Springs. Pastor Wayne Cash and Donald’s son-in-law, Pastor Jennings Johnson officiating. Interment Solon Township Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to The Springs Church.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

SANDRA A. JOHNSON

4C obit johnson

Sandra A. Johnson, 73, of Cedar Springs, passed away Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at her home surrounded by her family. Sandra was born March 13, 1942 in Chicago, Illinois. She was a dedicated employee of CS Manufacturing in the accounting department with 20 years of service. She loved spending time with her children and grandchildren, which was very important to her. She loved animals, sunshine, enjoyed gardening, and made amazing dill pickles. Surviving are her children, Bob (Paula) Johnson, Tim Johnson and Kathy Kay, Kathy (Ken) Coleman; grandchildren, Ryan Coleman, Kate Coleman, and Logan Armstrong; sisters, Kathy Carlson, and Ricci (Larry) Freeman; two nieces and their families. She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Luella Stine; sister, Judy Carlson Alden; infant sister, Nancy Jo. The family greeted friends Sunday, January 24 at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home Cedar Springs, where the service was held Monday, January 25. Pastor Robert Eckert officiating. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Kent County or the American Cancer Society.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

MELVIN K. BROWN

 

Melvin K. Brown, age 93, of Big Rapids, Michigan, and formerly of Grand Rapids, died peacefully on December 1, 2015 at home. He was born May 3, 1922 in Sparta, Michigan, and was a graduate of Cedar Springs High School, Western Michigan University, and Michigan State University. He was preceded in death by his loving wife, Rosemary, and is survived by his two sons, Steven and Timothy, and his two grandchildren, Cody (Angela) and Caitlin. As Melvin requested, cremation has taken place, and no memorial service will be held. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the charity of your choice. A private farewell to Melvin for the immediate family will be planned at a later date.

Posted in ObituaryComments (0)

Thank you

 

Thank you to all of the family and friends who were a part of our mom’s (Janet Olmsted) life celebration. The many faces, cards, flowers and memorial contributions were greatly appreciated.

Phil and Shari Wesche and family

Scott and Joni Olmsted and family

Posted in Thank YouComments (0)

Happy & healthy: tips for aging well

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Family Features

Although you can’t stop time, the right type and amount of physical activity can help stave off many age-related health problems.

More than half (59 percent) of Americans expect to still be living at home independently at the age of 80, according to a recent survey by the American Physical Therapy Association. However, the same study showed that at least half of the same population recognizes they will see a decline in strength and flexibility as they age.

Movement experts such as physical therapists can help aging individuals overcome pain, gain and maintain movement, and preserve independence – often helping to avoid the need for surgery or long-term use of prescription drugs.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

These nine tips, provided by the experts at the American Physical Therapy Association, are keys to helping you age well:

Chronic pain doesn’t have to be the boss of you. Each year 116 million Americans experience chronic pain from arthritis or other conditions. Proper exercise, mobility, and pain management techniques can ease pain, improving your overall quality of life.

You can get better and stronger at any age. Research shows that an appropriate exercise program can improve your muscle strength and flexibility as you age. Progressive resistance training, where muscles are exercised against resistance that gets more difficult as strength improves, has been shown to help prevent frailty.

You may not need surgery or drugs for your low back pain. Low back pain is often over-treated with surgery and drugs despite a wealth of scientific evidence demonstrating that physical therapy can be an effective alternative with less risk.

You can lower your risk of diabetes with exercise. One in four Americans over the age of 60 has diabetes. Obesity and physical inactivity can put you at risk for this disease, but a regular, appropriate physical activity routine is one of the best ways to prevent and manage type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Exercise can help you avoid falls and keep your independence. More than half of adults over 65 report problems with movement, including walking 1/4 mile, stooping, and standing. Exercise can improve movement and balance and reduce your risk of falls.

Your bones want you to exercise. Osteoporosis, or weak bones, affects more than half of Americans over the age of 54. Exercises that keep you on your feet, like walking, jogging or dancing, and exercises using resistance such as weight lifting, can improve bone strength or reduce bone loss.

Your heart wants you to exercise. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States. One of the top ways of preventing it and other cardiovascular diseases is exercise. Research shows that if you already have heart disease, appropriate exercise can improve your health.

Your brain wants you to exercise. People who are physically active, even later in life, are less likely to develop memory problems or Alzheimer’s disease, a condition which affects more than 40 percent of people over the age of 85.

You don’t have to live with bladder leakage. More than 13 million women and men in the United States have bladder leakage. A physical therapist can help you avoid spending years relying on pads or rushing to the bathroom.

To learn more about the role of physical activity as you age, or to find a physical therapist near you, visit MoveForwardPT.com.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)

“Migration in Michigan” presentation kicks off lecture series

Director of the Michigan Office of New Americans Bing Goei presents “Migration in Michigan” on Feb. 9 at Montcalm Community College.

Director of the Michigan Office of New Americans Bing Goei presents “Migration in Michigan” on Feb. 9 at Montcalm Community College.

Bing Goei, director of the Michigan Office of New Americans, presents “Migration in Michigan” on Feb. 9 at noon in rooms D303-305 in the Beatrice E. Doser Building on Montcalm Community College’s Sidney campus.

Michigan is the third largest state of residence for refugees coming to the United States. Goei will discuss what immigrants need and what they have to offer the state.

“One of the crucial issues today is the Syrian refugee crisis, and the question of how and when Michigan can safely welcome those fleeing from civil war in their Middle Eastern homeland,” said MCC Dean of Instruction & Student Development Gary Hauck. “Critical concerns have surfaced since the recent attacks in Paris, which were carried out by a terrorist embedded within the Syrian immigrants. Gov. Snyder is hoping to find a way to reach out to deserving Syrian immigrants while at the same time providing the necessary safeguards against any threat of terrorism.”

“As the director of the Michigan Office of New Americans, Goei is best suited to discuss the critical challenges and questions facing Michigan today as we determine how to appropriately accept and assimilate today’s immigrants from around the world,” Hauck added.

Goei immigrated to Michigan from Indonesia with his family in 1960. In 2001, he purchased Eastern Floral out of bankruptcy and rebuilt the Eastern Floral Company, which has become a Top 50 Teleflora florist with six West Michigan locations in Holland, Grand Haven and Grand Rapids. His passion for entrepreneurship and diversity led him to create the International Center for Entrepreneurial Excellence, a business incubator offering low-cost space to young, minority and female entrepreneurs in Grand Rapids. Gov. Rick Snyder named Goei the first director of the Michigan Office for New Americans because of his experiences as an immigrant and a job creator.

”Migration in Michigan” is the first of three presentations in the 2016 Stanley and Blanche Ash Lectureship Series, which aims to increase awareness of key issues of global and domestic importance, in partnership with the World Affairs Council.

Other lectures in the series include:

April 21: Brian Stout, author of the book “Trees of Life,” presents “Preserving Michigan’s Forests” from noon to 1 p.m. in rooms D303-305 in the Beatrice E. Doser Building on MCC’s Sidney campus and again from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Stanley and Blanche Ash Technology and Learning Center (Ash TLC) on MCC’s Greenville campus.

Oct. 11: Dr. Leela Fernandes, Glenda Dickerson Collegiate Professor of Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan, presents “India’s Political and Cultural Climate Today” from noon to 1 p.m. in rooms D303-305 in the Beatrice E. Doser Building on MCC’s Sidney campus and again from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Ash TLC on MCC’s Greenville campus.

Lunch or dinner is free for students with a current MCC student ID and is $2 for all others.

Posted in Arts & EntertainmentComments (0)

New exhibit open at Grand Rapids Public Museum

 

Grand Fish, Grand River

ENT-New-exhibitThe Grand Rapids Public Museum (GRPM) announced a brand new exhibition, Grand Fish, Grand River, that opened Saturday, Jan. 23. This new exhibit is a thematic extension of the current West Michigan Habitats exhibit, and includes two 10-month-old Lake Sturgeon.

Grand Fish, Grand River explores how the Great Lakes region’s largest and oldest fish, the Lake Sturgeon, once found in great abundance, is now a threatened species in our watersheds. The exhibit takes visitors through the connections to Native Americans, fishing history in the region and current science. Using artifacts from the GRPM Collections, along with the two live sturgeon, it will tie together the cultural, historical and scientific connections and explore rehabilitation efforts for this species in the Grand River and throughout the Great Lakes region.

Lake Sturgeon live along the rocky bottoms of our lakes and rivers, and are an important environmental indicator for the health of our ecosystem. These fish have fossil ancestors that from the Early Jurassic Period—the age of the dinosaurs. Lake Sturgeon have affected the region historically and culturally and still do today.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has identified 24 lake sturgeon populations as distinguished by major watersheds in Michigan waters: 2 in the Lake Superior drainage, 11 in the Lake Michigan drainage, 9 in the Lake Huron drainage and 2 in the Lake Erie/Lake St. Clair complex.

This exhibit has been made possible through partnership with the DNR, Fisheries Division, Tribal Coordination Unit; Oden State Fish Hatchery; Michigan State University, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and through sponsorship by Aqua Blue Aquarium Solutions, Blue Fish Aquarium, Grand Rapids Steelheaders Foundation, Great Lakes Fishery Trust and Schrems West Michigan Trout Unlimited.

Grand Rapids Public Museum

The Grand Rapids Public Museum, accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is located in downtown Grand Rapids, MI at 272 Pearl Street, NW. The mission of the Museum is to be a living monument of artifacts, ideas and stories told through exhibitions, events and educational programming designed to inspire, motivate and celebrate our human bond. We enrich the life of our community through experiences of the wider world in a uniquely Grand Rapids context. For additional information including hours of operation, admission fees and exhibit/event listings, please visit grpm.org.

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, FeaturedComments (0)

Septic truck sign

ENT-Joke-4-16-photo

Posted in Joke of the WeekComments (0)

Hometown Happening

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.


TOPS weight loss support group

Feb. 2: Take off pounds sensibly (TOPS), a non-profit weight loss support group for men and women, meets every Tuesday at the Resurrection Lutheran Church in Sand Lake. Your first visit is free so come check out what TOPS can do to help you reach your weigh loss goals! Weigh-ins 8:15-9am, meeting starts at 9:15am. In case of inclement weather, meetings are cancelled if Tri-County or Cedar Springs schools are closed. Call Barb at 696-8049 for more information. #4

God’s Kitchen in Cedar Springs

Feb. 2,9,16,23: Join us for dinner every Tuesday. God’s Kitchen – Cedar Springs welcomes families from Northern Kent County and the surrounding area to a Tuesday Evening Meal. No charge – no registration required!  Served from 5:30 – 6:30 pm at the St. John Paul II Parish, 3110 – 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs. For more information, call the Church office at 616-696-3904. #4

KDL Lab: littleBits: Learn to invent with Electronics

Feb. 6: Explore, tinker and innovate with littleBits, the ultimate electronic building tool. Circuit modules snap together to help you build your ultimate electronic innovation. Create a music synthesizer, a robot or even a Mars Rover! Great learn-by-doing activity for kids who may be interested in a future in engineering and robotics. For ages 6 and older. Saturday, February 6, 10:30 am at the Nelson Township/Sand Lake Branch, 88 Eighth St. 616-636-4251. #4

Help Promote Literacy

Feb. 9: The Literacy Center of West Michigan has scheduled and information session on Tuesday February 9th, for prospective volunteer tutors. This session is held at 2 pm and lasts one hour. It allows persons interested in becoming volunteer tutors to find out more about the Center and its literacy programs. At the end of the session there will be an opportunity to sign up for tutor training. By training people to be tutors, the Center can offer one-on-one reading help to adults asking for assistance in reading or English as a Second Language (ESL). You do not need to speak another language to tutor ESL. The Center is located at 1120 Monroe Ave., NW, Suite 240, Grand Rapids. Please call 616-459-5151 (ext. 10) or email us at info@literacycenterwm.org to register. #4

Women’s Day Retreat

Feb. 6: Need to get away from it all? A day away just for women will be held at the beautiful Loon’s Nest Banquet Center at Whitefish Lake on Saturday, February 6th from 9 am – 4 pm. Registration is at 8:30 am. The event called “G.R.O.W. – the Godly Rise of Women” is designed to encourage growth in women’s relationships, not only with God, but with spouses, family and personal friendships as well. Tickets are $35 which includes a delicious lunch, all day snacks and beverages, guest speaker Gail Ramesh the originator or the retreat ministry called Unveiled, and materials for special (hands on) breakout sessions. The day is sponsored by the Women’s Ministry of the Solon Center Wesleyan Church. Tickets can be purchased at online at: https://scwchurch.cloverdonations.com/grow-registration/ or call the church office at 616-696-3229. The Loon’s Nest is located at 2241 Bass Lake Rd., Pierson. All women welcome! #4p

Posted in Hometown HappeningsComments (0)

Empty house catches fire, later torn down

N-Fire-building1-157-N-Main

The house at 157 N. Main, just north of Cedar Creek (on the west side of the street) was the site of fire on January 13. Post photo by J. Reed.

The house at 157 N. Main was torn down on January 19, as scheduled. Photo by M. Fraser

The house at 157 N. Main was torn down on January 19, as scheduled. Photo by M. Fraser

By Judy Reed

A house that was scheduled to be demolished was the site of a structure fire on Wednesday, January 13.

According to Cedar Springs Fire Chief Marty Fraser, the call came in about 8:28 p.m. on a structure fire at 157 N. Main, which is just north of Cedar Creek. When they arrived, flames were seen on the second story. Fraser said they cut in around the chimney on the south side to go in and stop the fire, which burned through the wall and floor.

The building, which was purchased by the Community Building Development Team in October, was scheduled to be torn down, and all utilities had been turned off.

 A reward is being offered for information related to the fire at 157 N. Main. Post photo by J. Reed.

A reward is being offered for information related to the fire at 157 N. Main. Post photo by J. Reed.

“We can rule out natural gas or electric as being a cause,” remarked Fraser.

Both Fraser and CBDT president Kurt Mabie said that there was evidence that people had been in the building over the last couple of weeks. “We secured it but they still got back in,” said Mabie.

A K9 searched the premises but found no traces of accelerant, and the Fire Marshal deemed the fire suspicious but undetermined. If you have any information about the recent fire, they are now offering up to a $5,000 reward for any information leading to the arrest and/or conviction of anyone on arson-related charges. You can call the Kent County Sheriff Department at 616-632-6015 or Arson Control at 1-800-44-ARSON (27766).

The house was torn down on Tuesday, January 19. Mabie said they weren’t originally looking to purchase the house, but when it was offered, he thought it would be a good deal for the people of the community. The property is just north of Cedar Creek, and runs back to the White Pine Trail, to other property the team purchased on Pine Street. Mabie said they have no immediate plans for the property, but it will enhance the beauty and park-like atmosphere they are creating along Cedar Creek, which will eventually have a boardwalk and bridge, along with a new library just south of the Creek, an ampitheatre west of the library, and a Community building on the old Johnson Lumber property across the White Pine Trail.

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

advert
Cedar Car Co
Kent Theatre
Ensley Team Five Star Realty
Advertising Rates Brochure

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!