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Archive | December, 2015

Happy 17th Birthday Autumn

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Happy 17th Birthday

Autumn Schovey

January 4, 1999

 

You’ll ALWAYS be My Little Girl

 

You’re beautiful baby from the outside in

Chase your dreams but always know the road

That’ll lead you home again

Go on, take on this whole world

But to me you know you’ll always be, my little girl

Love, Daddy and Mommy

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Richard M. Reed Sr.

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In loving memory

Richard M. Reed Sr.

October 9, 1933-January 4, 2004

 

Not how did he die, but how did he live?

Not what did he gain, but what did he give?

These are the units to measure the worth

Of a man as a man, regardless of birth.

Not, what was his church, nor what was his creed?

But had he befriended those really in need?

Was he ever ready, with word of good cheer,

To bring back a smile, to banish a tear?

Not what did the sketch in the newspaper say,

But how many were sorry when he passed away?

 

It’s been 12 years, but we still miss you and think of you everyday.

Love, your family

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Roger Allen

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In Loving Memory

Roger Allen

June 20, 1928 to Jan. 07, 2013

DAD,

Still missing you.

Keep God smiling!

Your loving daughter,

Lois

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Cold weather a hot time for minnow harvesters

 

Cut netting: A seine pulled tight to shore that contains minnows for sorting and harvesting. The net had been positioned in a cut off Saginaw Bay.

Cut netting: A seine pulled tight to shore that contains minnows for sorting and harvesting. The net had been positioned in a cut off Saginaw Bay.

From the Michigan DNR

Falling water temperatures can mean a lot of things to those who enjoy the outdoors.

Cold water increases interest in steelhead fishing, for instance, and decreases the focus on bass fishing. However, to Jeff Slancik of Bay County, cold water means just one thing: It’s time to catch minnows.

Slancik, 49, of Pinconning is a bait dealer whose business heats up when the weather cools down.

In cold weather, the baitfish head inshore from the Great Lakes and that’s when Slancik can catch them in large volume and keep them alive in ponds for the winter.“You have to wait until the water temperature comes down,” Slancik said. “I’d say in a typical year we start around Nov. 1 and you’re lucky to see past Dec. 1. We lost the first week of November this year because it was too warm. Once that water gets down to 40 degrees, you can catch minnows. The colder it is, the longer we can keep the minnows.”

Slancik has operated Jeff’s Bait Co. in Pinconning for 25 years. He’s one of a number of Michigan commercial bait wholesalers who catch minnows and sell them to distributors, who then get them to the bait shops anglers depend upon.

Picking: A worker inspects the contents of a dip net, picking out nontarget minnow species as the crew works a cut off Lake Huron in Michigan’s thumb area.

Picking: A worker inspects the contents of a dip net, picking out nontarget minnow species as the crew works a cut off Lake Huron in Michigan’s thumb area.

Minnow harvesters are licensed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Tom Goniea, the DNR fisheries biologist who oversees the program from Lansing, said there are about 80 licensed minnow catchers in Michigan, but only a handful of large operators like Slancik.

“Most of the catchers’ licenses belong to guys who own retail shops and may catch minnows every now and then to sell to their customers,” Goniea said. “Ninety percent of the state’s bait harvest is coming out of Saginaw Bay, the St. Clair River, the Detroit River and Lake Erie. It’s mostly emerald and spottail shiners. Your fatheads, golden shiners and suckers are largely imported.”

Minnows: A perch is removed from a dip net full of minnows taken from a cut off Saginaw Bay.

Minnows: A perch is removed from a dip net full of minnows taken from a cut off Saginaw Bay.

Minnow harvesters are restricted to the types and size of gear they can use.

“On the Great Lakes, they can use a 125-foot seine,” Goniea said. “Inland waters have different regulations that vary by water type. In Michigan, most waters are open to minnow harvest unless they are specifically closed.”

For Slancik, a recent day began on a cut (a nonflowing man-made channel connected to a larger body of water which aids in getting boats access to open water) along Saginaw Bay not far from home.

Two of Slancik’s employees manned the ends of a seine stretched across the cut, one on the bank, the other in a float tube along the edge of the deeper side of the cut.

Slowly, they pulled the seine toward the inside end of the cut, where Slancik directed them.

When they reached a point a couple yards off the back end of the cut, Slancik sprang into action, bringing dip nets and a larger floating pen net with him.

The trio began scooping up minnows, weeding through them to toss out the non-minnow captives, mostly perch, and transferring the minnows into the net pen.

The fish were then filtered through a grader— a floating device with a slotted bottom that allowed the smaller fish to slip through to the pen, but contained the larger fish.

From there, they again dipped the minnows up with hand nets and sorted, tossing out perch or other non-target species, transferring the minnows into 5-gallon buckets.

Slancik took a bucket to his truck, which is equipped with numerous, oxygenated tanks. There, he sorted one more time, removing any non-minnow fish before he transferred the minnows to the truck tank.

Slancik said sorting takes a lot of time. Had they found many more perch or other unwanted specimens in the seine, he said he would have dumped the whole load back into the cut and gone elsewhere.

Slancik has been catching minnows his whole life. He started working for his great-uncle Frank, of Frank’s Great Outdoors in Linwood fame, who Slancik called “the Fred Bear of minnow-catching.”

Slancik works a territory from Pinconning north and east along the thumb of the state to Port Austin in Huron County. More than half the minnows he takes are used in the local Saginaw Bay area. In a cold winter, with good ice, 75 percent of his minnows are sold locally.

“From November first to December, it’s go, go, go, sometimes 24 hours a day for five days straight,” Slancik said. “On a good day, we’ll get 300 gallons of minnows, about 700 per gallon.” Minnows are sold by the gallon commercially in Michigan. In some others states, they’re sold by the pound.

Like most fishing pursuits, Slancik’s minnow catching luck runs hot and cold.

“I’ve had catches of 1,000 gallons, no problem. One time we caught 10,000 gallons and I only needed 1,000 gallons. I let the other 9,000 gallons go,” Slancik said. “But I’ve had times when I’ve worked all day and only caught 20 gallons.”

Slancik said he puts between 7 million and 10 million minnows in ponds, which he keeps aerated, for the winter season.

“I can keep up to 2,000 gallons in a pond, but I want to back off a little this year because we might have a warmer winter,” he said. “Bigger minnows survive better in the ponds. The smaller minnows don’t have the strength to be caught in warmer temperatures and held until spring.”

State law prohibits minnows caught in Michigan to be exported out of state.

“Any minnow that is harvested in Michigan is meant to meet the local demand of Michigan anglers, without disturbing the food chain for our predator fishes such as trout, walleye and smallmouth bass,” Goniea said.

Goniea said minnow harvesters are not doing any damage to the fisheries resource.

“In almost all cases, human harvest has little to no effect on available resources,” he said. “On a place like Saginaw Bay, a million emerald shiners is a minute part of the population. Walleyes, bass and the other predator fish control the bait population. Human harvest is a drop in the bucket, and minnows are capable of explosive growth and reproduction.”

This fall, Slancik has mostly caught emerald shiners, the minnows anglers call “blues.” Spottail shiners, known as “grays,” were down a little.

“Spottails tend to run larger than emeralds. Lake trout fishermen like spottails, just because of their size. But big emeralds will work just as well,” Slancik said. “We noticed that last year because nobody caught spottails. But people get it stuck in their heads that they want spottails. These days, there are more emeralds than spottails. It used to be the other way around.”

Slancik said there are more baitfish in Lake Huron now than ever.

“Lake Huron is like a big fish tank — you can only put so many fish in an aquarium,” Slancik said. “When one is up, the other is down, but spottails are slowly coming back.”

Slancik said he’s seeing more gizzard shad and alewives lately, too.

The DNR monitors the minnow harvest to make sure invasive species and those that can carry diseases — such as viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) — aren’t spread.

In the summer months, when minnows can’t be kept in ponds, a lot of minnows are imported.

But in winter, if you’re seeking a Pure Michigan experience—say walleye fishing through the ice–you’re likely using minnows caught right here in Michigan, by commercial bait harvesters like Slancik.

For more information on Michigan minnows, visit the DNR’s webpage at www.michigan.gov/fishing.

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Not a creature was stirring

 

OUT-Nature-niche-Ranger-Steve-Head-ShotBy Ranger Steve Mueller

 

As we wind down the year, creatures stirring in our home are less obvious. Mice seem more abundant in fall. A mouse was caught in a trap yesterday and a short-tailed shrew was caught in another. I am dismayed to kill a shrew because they are nature’s living mouse trap. A drug carried in their saliva causes mice to become uncoordinated when bitten. It becomes easier for the shrew to kill the mouse. Shrews eat more than their weight daily. A mouse is a good day’s meal. I take comfort in the idea that shrews control our mice population (I hope).

Some would think nature niches stop at our door step but that is not the case. Wildlife inhabit our homes whether we want them or not. Humans are not separated from nature at any time. Air infiltrates our homes. Warmth arrives from furnaces to maintain our tropical environment. House plants filter air, remove chemicals and purify living space. Be thankful for air leaks and house plants.

We have become better at sealing air leaks, but home air quality studies show air in modern homes are not as healthy as in poorly insulated homes. We insulate well and have many house plants to purify air. I encourage each of us to have many house plants. It is most important in winter. Bring nature into the house.

Other creatures live in our homes. During the summer we notice more insects. Flies become a nuisance. Screens work well but an open door allows them to sneak in unnoticed. They lay eggs on hidden dead mice and within a few days reduce the mouse to fly flesh.

A naturalist friend is a spider specialist and tells me we are never more than three feet from a spider in the house. Spiders eliminate many insects. Cherish spiders in the house. Most are actually smaller than a mosquito but we notice the larger ones. Many do not build webs but hunt their prey. The lack of web building helps them stay hidden while they secretly do important work. Save money by letting spiders do pest control for free instead of hiring a company to treat your home with chemicals.

That is not always acceptable. When we bought our house, we had a termite problem and needed to hire a company to save the house from serious damage. Back then dangerous chemicals were used and I wonder if that could be a source of my cancer. Doctors have no common links among people with multiple myeloma. The cancer cause remains a mystery.

Termite life history studies have revealed ways to get them to carry hormone material to the termite nest that interferes with reproduction without putting dangerous chemicals in the home and it only affects termites. The absence of termites opened living space for carpenter ants that threatened the structural integrity of the home. We needed to call a pest management company. Chemicals were used around the perimeter of the house. I do not want that, but find it necessary. I inquired and requested use of the safest chemicals.

Many insects live with us and we get along fine. Very few cause health, safety, or damage to people or the homes. Some can be a nuisance. The European “ladybugs” have become abundant and enter home siding to hibernate by the thousands. Many get into houses. Too many around is disturbing and unlike native ladybugs, they will bite. Some Leaf-footed bugs enter the house. I just pick them up and release them outside. Earwigs scurry in damp areas. They do not enter ears. Crickets are often only noticed when they serenade during dark hours when we choose to sleep.

Many species of flies enter the house. I recently removed the kitchen ceiling light cover to empty dead fly bodies that accumulated during warmer weather. Species of small micro moths are present. In the bathroom, I saw small moths in the bathtub. A closer look demonstrated only two wings and proved them to be a fly named moth fly. It feeds on sludge in the drain for free—less drain cleaner needed. The list of creatures that share our homes is long. We mostly get along well with household creatures except for a few that will eat our home from under and around us. Find a balance with minimal creature control.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Local author releases second book

Patricia Rose with her latest book, Medicine at Crooked Hat.

Patricia Rose with her latest book, Medicine at Crooked Hat.

Local author and playwright Patricia Rose has just released her second novel, titled Medicine at Crooked Hat. It is the second book in the American Sojourner Series, which follows the continuing saga of the Beaumont family and their adventures in the early days of our country.

“It has intrigue, drama, romance and history,” said Rose. “It’s an interesting read for both men and women.”

It can be purchased at Schulers books on 28th St in Grand Rapids, and in their online store. It can also be found on Amazon.com.

The first book in the series was titled A Pocket Full of Glory.

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Cedar Springs Brewing Co. a part of KD aLe tour

 

Kent District Library pours a third round for KD aLe

Josh Bernstein is pretty excited to be able to combine two of his passions: libraries and Michigan beers.

Bernstein, manager of KDL’s Grandville Branch, is part of a small group of library staffers who are helping to order up a third round of the library’s wildly popular KD aLe series.

The accolades the state is getting as craft beer-friendly are wonderful, Bernstein said, “but I would think all the new options would be overwhelming if you didn’t know much about craft beer.”

That’s where librarians come in, he said. “As always, we’re here to help you understand this new culture that’s all around us. That’s what we do. “

KD aLe features home brewing programs and brewery tours and tastings, as well as a beer-themed book club. This season will include those events with partners Rockford Brewing Company, Perrin Brewing Co., Osgood Brewing, RailTown Brewing Company, Cedars Springs Brewing Co., and EB Coffee and Pub. We will end the series with a wrap-up party and home brew release at Gravel Bottom Brewery. All KD aLe events are for adults 21 and older.
Rockford Brewing Company Tour:

Learn how they make their signature beers such as Rogue River Brown, Sheehan’s Irish Stout and Paradigm MPA. Tour and talk will be held at Rockford Brewing Company, 12 E. Bridge St., Rockford.
Tuesday, January 5, 6:30 p.m. and
Tuesday, February 2, 6:30 p.m.

Home Brewing Basics:

Jump into home brewing with expert advice from Chrissy Walker of Gravel Bottom Craft Brewery and Supply. Learn everything you need to know to get started brewing including ingredients and equipment. Tuesday, January 12, 6:30 p.m., Cascade Twp. Branch;
Thursday, January 28, 6:00 p.m., Grandville Branch;
Wednesday, February 3, 6:30 p.m., Englehardt (Lowell) Branch;
Wednesday, February 10, 6:30 p.m., Kentwood (Richard L. Root) Branch;
Thursday, February 11, 6:30 p.m., Plainfield Twp. Branch;
Tuesday, February 23, 6:00 p.m., Krause Memorial (Rockford) Branch.

Home Brewing: Advanced Class:

Matt Michiels of Gravel Bottom Craft Brewing and Supply presents methods for taking your home brew up a notch! Learn more about grains and hops, how to design your own recipe and cleaning tips. Thursday, January 14, 6:30 p.m., Byron Twp. Branch; Tuesday, January 19, 6:30 p.m., Cascade Twp. Branch.

Perrin Brewing Co. Tasting and Talk:

KD aLe welcomes new partner Perrin Brewing Company! Join us at 5910 Comstock Park Drive NW, Comstock Park to discuss how they make their signature beers such as Grapefruit IPA and Perrin Black and to taste what they have on tap. Thursday, January 14, 6:30 p.m.

KD aLe Book Club:

Combine your love of books and brews at the KD aLe Book Club. Enjoy some craft beer from Osgood Brewing while we talk about what we’ve been reading. Expert book recommendations from KDL librarians included. Book club held at Osgood Brewing, 4051 Chicago Dr. SW, Grandville. Thursday, January 21, 7:00 p.m.; Thursday, February 18, 7:00 p.m.

KD aLe Beer Release Party and Tour with RailTown Brewing Company:

Taste the newest KD aLe brewed exclusively for KDL by RailTown Brewing Company. Show your library card for a special deal on beer tasting. Tour and talk will be held at the RailTown Brewing Company, 3555 68th St SE, Caledonia. Wednesday, January 27, 6:30 p.m.

Cedar Springs Brewing Co. Tour: 

Be one of the first to tour the new Cedar Springs Brewery. Taste their traditional German-style beer while touring the brand new facility. Located at 95 N Main, Cedar Springs, Wednesday, January 27, 6:30 p.m.

EB Coffee & Pub Tour:

Owner Justin Nichols will share information on the similarities between brewing coffee and beer. After the tour, show your library card to get a special deal on beer and coffee tasting. Tour and talk will be held at EB Coffee and Pub, 8980 N. Rodgers Court Suite D., Caledonia.
Tuesday, February 9, 7:00 p.m.
Osgood Brewing Tour:

Osgood Brewing is hosting a tour and a chance to learn about hops from Pilot Malt House’s Erik May. After the tour, show your library card to get a special deal on beer tasting. Osgood Brewing is at 4051 Chicago Dr SW, Grandville.
Wednesday, February 10, 6:30 p.m.

KD aLe Wrap up Party and Winning Home Brew Release:

Join us at Gravel Bottom brewery as we celebrate another successful season of KD aLe. On tap will be the winning brew as developed by our KDL Home Brewing Competition winner as well as a re-release of the Scotch Ale Gravel Bottom brewed as KD aLe last year. Food, beer, music and door prizes and the chance to hang out with cool library people will make this an all-around wonderful evening. 418 Ada Dr SE, Ada. Wednesday, February 24, 6:30 PM

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Learned from a snowman

 

All I need to know about life I learned from a snowman….

• It’s okay if you’re a little bottom heavy.

• Hold your ground, even when the heat is on.

• Wearing white is always appropriate.

• Winter is the best of the four seasons.

• It takes a few extra rolls to make a good midsection.

• There’s nothing better than a foul weather friend.

• We’re all made up of mostly water.

• You know you’ve made it when they write a song about you.

• Accessorize! Accessorize! Accessorize!

• Avoid yellow snow.

• Don’t get too much sun.

• It’s embarrassing when you can’t look down and see your feet.

• It’s fun to hang out in your front yard.

• Always put your best foot forward.

• There’s no stopping you once you’re on a roll.

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Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.


Start your New Year with TOPS

Jan. 5: Keep your New Year’s resolutions with TOPS (Take off pounds sensibly). TOPS is a non-profit weight loss support group for men and women, meets every Tuesday at the Resurrection Lutheran Church in Sand Lake. Your first visit is free so come check out what TOPS can do to help you reach your weigh loss goals! Weigh-ins 8:15-9am, meeting starts at 9:15am. In case of inclement weather, meetings are cancelled if Tri-County or Cedar Springs schools are closed. Call Barb at 696-8049 for more information. #52

God’s Kitchen in Cedar Springs

Jan. 5,12,19,26: Join us for dinner every Tuesday. God’s Kitchen – Cedar Springs welcomes families from Northern Kent County and the surrounding area to a Tuesday Evening Meal. No charge – no registration required!  Served from 5:30 – 6:30 pm at the St. John Paul II Parish, 3110 – 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs. For more information, call the Church office at 616-696-3904. #52

P.A.T.H. For Diabetes Workshop

Jan. 7: Personal Action Toward Health (P.A.T.H.) for Diabetes is a six week workshop designed to provide skills and tools to help you improve your health and manage your symptoms. Thru PATH for Diabetes you will learn to deal with the challenges of not feeling well, effectively talk to healthcare providers and family members, increase your energy, stay independent, and set goals. This is a FREE class, held once a week for six weeks beginning January 7 from 9am-11:30am at Solon Center Wesleyan Church, 15671 Algoma Ave. Cedar Springs, MI 49319.  To register, or for questions please contact  Christi Demitz, MSU Extension, 616.632.7881, demitzch@anr.msu.edu. #51,52p

Ugly Sweater Cupcake Wars

Jan 13: Cupcake Wars are BACK! This time with a holiday twist. Teens are encourages to wear their ugliest (most unique) holiday sweater and decorate a holiday themed cupcake. Judges will give awards for the ugliest (most unique) sweater and cupcake decorating skills. Pre-registration is required and participant spots are limited. For teens grades 6 – 12. Wednesday, January 13th at 6:30 pm at the Nelson Township/Sand Lake KDL Branch, 88 Eighth St. 616-636-4251. #52

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Don M. Miles

C-OBIT-MilesDon M. Miles 88 of Pierson, went to be with his Lord and Savior on Saturday, December 26, 2015 at the Grand Rapids Home for the Veterans. Don was born May 14, 1927 in Montcalm Township, MI the son of John and Bessie (Thompson) Miles. Don began his naval career on Nov. 10, 1947 and attained the rank of Machinist Mate Chief Petty Officer prior to his retirement on Nov. 7, 1968. He served during the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam War. Following his naval career he worked at Wolverine Worldwide for 20 years as a machinist. He was a member of the Cedar Springs American Legion. He had been an active member of the Cedar Springs Free Methodist Church (The Springs) where he was head usher for over 30 years. Don served Boy Scout Troop 222 of Cedar Springs for over 37 years, many of them as scoutmaster. Surviving are his wife Dawn, whom he married in 2000; children, Valerie (Howard) Mathewson, David (Elaine) Miles, Joseph (Mary Ann) Miles, Gloria (Kevin) Kizewski; seven grandchildren, Adam Clouse, Alan Clouse, C.J. Miles, Mikayla Mathewson, Kyle Stephens, Caleb Kizewski, Bryce Kizewski; two great grandchildren, Hunter and Cierra; sisters, Gertrude Coalter, Katherine (Reuben) Hoxsie, Patricia (William) Newman. He was preceded in death by his wife, Jean in 1996; five brothers and one sister, Buddy, Sam, Bill, Walter, Norman, and Agnes Telder. The family will greet friends Tuesday from 9:00 am until time of service at 11:00 am at The Springs Church, 88 Grant St., Cedar Springs. Pastors Jennings Johnson and Wayne Cash officiating. Interment Elmwood Cemetery, Cedar Springs. Military honors by the U.S. Navy.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs.

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