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Archive | September, 2015

Teen gets first buck during youth hunt

OUT-Youth-hunt-Rose-web

Derek Rose, age 16, the son of Pete and Cherri Rose, of Solon Township, got his first buck ever during last weekend’s youth hunt. He got the 8-point buck on Sunday, September 20, while hunting on private land, in Kent County, with his dad, Pete. The deer weighed in at 160 lbs. after being dressed out. Congratulations, Derek!

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Weekly fishing tip

 

From the Michigan DNR

OUT-fishing-tip-walleye-april2-2015webEarly autumn walleye – what you need to know

Targeting walleye in the fall can offer some of the best fishing of the season. Here are a few things to keep in mind if you target this sport fish in the coming weeks.

  1. In early fall walleye can be found in a variety of locations within the water body, including deep, shallow or anywhere in between. Keep that in mind and don’t stick to one depth range.
  2. If you’re out in the morning, check the areas where deep water meets the shallow spots.
  3. As the day goes by, start heading deeper, as walleye can be photosensitive.
  4. Don’t forget to try your luck during the nighttime hours. This can be a very productive time during the fall, especially along rock points and flat areas.

 This tip was adapted from Michigan Outdoor News. 

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Safety First with Fall Car Care

 

CAR-Fall-car-care-Safety-First1-webCAR-Fall-car-care-Safety-First2-webWhat you should know to get ready for winter

(Family Features) Conducting routine maintenance on your vehicle is necessary to maintain optimal performance and prevent costly repairs. As colder weather approaches, and with it the potential for treacherous road conditions, giving certain areas of your car special attention can also protect your safety.

“Getting your vehicle ready for winter while temperatures are still mild is a proactive approach to preventive maintenance that helps ensure safety and reliability when severe winter weather strikes,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.

The following tips will help you learn how to care for the systems and features most likely to affect your safety as winter approaches. Learn about the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair, and order a free copy of the council’s Car Care Guide, at www.carcare.org.

Brakes

The brake system is a car’s most important safety system. A faulty brake system may impede your ability to safely slow your vehicle in inclement driving conditions or avoid an accident. Brakes sustain normal wear and eventually need to be replaced for both performance and safety reasons. Ignoring routine maintenance and letting brake pads wear too thin can lead to costly rotor and drum replacement, in addition to compromising your ability to execute a sudden stop safely.

  • Have your complete brake system thoroughly inspected annually and replace equipment as needed.
  • If your car is pulling to the left or right, or if you hear odd noises when you apply the brakes, you should have your brakes inspected. Other warning signs include an illuminated brake warning light, brake grabbing, low pedal feel, vibration, hard pedal feel and squealing.
  • Don’t overlook the parking brake, which also may require adjustment or replacement parts.

Wheels and Tires

When roads become wet or icy, the right wheels and tires can help ensure you have the traction you need to maintain control. Maintaining tire balance and wheel alignment reduces tire wear and improves handling and fuel economy. Tire replacement is necessary if the tread depth is below the minimum legal requirement, or if the sidewalls are severely cracked or punctured. In addition, normal wear and road conditions can take their toll on your car’s steering and suspension system and disrupt the alignment, which in turn reduces optimum handling.

  • Use the “penny test” to check your tread; if you see Lincoln’s head above the tread, you are ready for new tires.
  • Have your car’s alignment checked at least annually or at the first sign of improper handling or uneven wear.
  • Check inflation pressure at least once a month (including the spare) and once per week in the winter.
  • Rotate and balance tires every 6,000 miles to avoid accelerated wear on shock absorbers and struts.

Battery

Your battery should be securely mounted, with connections clean, tight and corrosion-free. If the battery is three years old or more, it should be tested and replaced if necessary.

Headlights

Headlights play a major role in safe driving; the chances for accidents increase if you can’t see or be seen. The lighting system provides nighttime visibility, signals and alerts other drivers, and supplies light for viewing instruments and the vehicle’s interior.

  • If there is any doubt about whether or not your headlights should be on, turn them on.
  • Keep headlights, tail lights and signal lights clean. External dirt and debris can dim operational lights, making it difficult to be seen by others.
  • Make sure your headlights are properly aimed. If they aren’t, headlights blind other drivers and reduce your ability to see the road.
  • Don’t overdrive your headlights. You should be able to stop inside the illuminated area; otherwise you are creating a blind crash area in front of your vehicle.
  • Replace dimming, rapidly blinking or non-functioning lights immediately, but check first to ensure a loose or faulty fuse isn’t the source of the problem.

Windshield Wipers

The wiper system keeps excessive water, snow and dirt from building up on the windshield, maintaining clear visibility. Many factors can accelerate the replacement of wipers, including operating conditions, frequency of use, material and type of wipers and weather.

  • In general, replace blades every six months or when cracked, cut, torn, streaking or chattering.
  • Be aware that some vehicles have two washer fluid reservoirs. Check levels monthly and use washer fluid only; do not use water.

    Maintenance Checklist

    Whether you do it yourself or take your car to a professional service technician, the Car Care Council recommends these basic maintenance procedures to keep your vehicle operating at its best:

    1. Check all fluids, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission, as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.

    2. Check the hoses and belts for signs of damage or wear.

    3. Check the battery and replace if necessary.

    4. Check the brake system annually and have the brake linings, rotors and drums inspected at each oil change.

    5. Inspect the exhaust system for leaks, damage and broken supports or hangers if there is an unusual noise.

    6. Check the heating, ventilating and air conditioning system, as proper heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and for safety reasons such as defrosting.

    7. Inspect the steering and suspension system annually, including shock absorbers, struts and chassis parts such as ball joints, tie rod ends and other related components.

    8. Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.

    9. Check the wipers and lighting, including both interior and exterior lighting, and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.

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Speak Life

Grace-ChurchPastor Kevin Reed

Grace Evangelical Free Church

4714 13 Mile Rd, Rockford

 

“The tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit” Proverbs 18:21 (NIV).

God has given us an amazing gift in the ability to communicate. As people created in His image, we have a unique privilege and responsibility that none of His other creation has. We have the ability to communicate in a way that none of His other creation can. We have been given the power of life and death, and we hold that power in our tongues. The old adage goes like this, “sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.” Nothing could be further from the truth. The bruises that come from sticks and stones may stay for a while, but they quickly fade and heal. But the wounds that are caused in our life by others, who use their tongues to speak death into our lives, end up affecting us and hurting us for years after they are spoken.

There is nothing neutral about our tongues. Either death or life, those are the only two possible outcomes from the use of our tongues. Every conversation that we have, every word uttered under our breath, and every word yelled in anger or frustration is either bringing life or death. From our bosses to our co-workers; from our spouses to our kids; from the gas station attendant to the checkout clerk at the grocery store—every time we open our mouths, either life comes out or death comes out. There is no such thing as a neutral word.

As God’s children, created in His image, we should strive to speak life. We should strive to not tear down others with our tongues but instead build them up. We should not be caught up in grumbling, complaining or criticizing, but instead we should strive to encourage, uplift and edify with every word that comes out of our mouth. God gives the power to us but the choice is up to you.

Are we using the gift that God gave us to bring death or life? Are we looking for ways to speak life into a world that is hurting all around us? Or are we caught in the great hypocrisy—a mouth that on Sunday praises our God but then throughout the rest of the week curses and drags down those who are made in His image and His likeness (James 3:9-10)? The choice is up to you; will it be death or life? The power is in your tongue. Speak wisely!

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Less is more

 

By Ronnie McBrayer

By Ronnie McBrayer

The Apostle Paul wrote, “I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength” (Philippians 4:13). There’s no way he could have anticipated how those words would later be used. Printed on bumper stickers for aspiring marathoners; a benediction for victors of a football game; inscribed on the shirt of a middle-aged man attempting to reclaim his lost youth in the weight room. I don’t think this is what Paul had in mind.

The Apostle was talking about contentment, not accomplishment, borrowing an idea from the Greek Stoics. The only way one could be happy, per Stoic thought, was to rely upon nothing and no one. This was Stoicism’s highest ideal, and you have to admit that they were on to something. If you didn’t need someone else’s money, protection, or affection, if you could be free of all fear, expectations, and emotional hostage-holding, you would be truly liberated.

Thus, Paul and the Stoics both agree that a determined, “Can Do” attitude of self-sufficiency can lead to an extraordinary level of personal contentment. But they disagree on how to get there. The Stoic path was one of perfect detachment and internal strength, self-control, and fortitude. Paul offered a different path; not an “I Can Do” attitude, but a “He Can Do” submission. That is the context for his mantra, “I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength.”

No, this isn’t about overcoming, but accepting. It’s not a call to Stoic-like effort, rather, it is positioning one’s self to receive the strength that Christ offers. Contentment is not the result of trying harder, no matter what the Stoics or iron-pumping athletes might say. It is the result of relying upon a Power greater than yourself.

This is why Paul’s words are often so grotesquely misappropriated. They are used as a form of defiance against the odds, used to magically conjure up our personal strength when we have none left, making us try harder, go farther, endure longer, and never surrender until we are victorious. This is the exact opposite of what Paul was saying. It is only in surrender, the surrender of our own power, that the power of Christ can be ours.

Tireless self-sufficiency will take you far in life, but to be genuinely content, and genuinely powerful, it won’t take more but less—less of yourself and more of Jesus.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, blogger, pastor, and author of multiple books. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

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50th wedding anniversary

C-ANNIV-stoner-webHarold & Karen Stoner

Harold and Karen (Homrich) Stoner, of Cedar Springs, are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. They were married on September 24, 1965. They met while working at Keeler Brass in Grand Rapids. Harold retired from General Motors in 1999 and focused his efforts on fishing, golfing, and hunting the elusive mushroom. Karen loved being a stay-at-home mom but redirected her attention to the home’s beautiful landscaping, golfing and Angry Birds. They enjoy spending time with their two lovely children, their families and babysitting the grandpets. A celebration with family & friends is planned in their honor.

Cheers to 50 Years!

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ARTHUR CAZIER

Arthur Cazier age 81, of Grant, passed away September 18, 2015 at Spectrum Health Butterworth Campus.  He was born January 17, 1934 in Grand Rapids the son of Cecil and Myrtle (Elliott) Cazier.  During his working years he worked at McInerny Spring and Wire for 38 Years before retiring from there.  He loved fishing, hunting and playing his harmonica which Art played at many locations.  Surviving is his sister, Bessie Smith of Marne. He was preceded in death by his wife Dorothy in 2011, and five brothers, Russ, Rex, Glen, Wes, and Jerry; and two sisters, Doris and Iva. Memorial services will take place on October 14 at the Cedar Springs American Legion Post from Noon till 4 pm.

Arrangements were entrusted to the Heckman Funeral Home of Howard City

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ALICE M. KELLY

 

Alice M. Kelly, 84 of Lake City, went to be with her Lord and Savior on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 at Belle Oakes Living Center. Alice was born June 10, 1931 in Gladwin, Michigan, the daughter of Reynold and Martha (Koenke) Kranich. She enjoyed writing and journaling and wrote many letters to missionaries over the years. Surviving are her husband, Gerald whom she married on July 25, 1959; sons, Craig (Finley), Dale, Ken (Heather); sisters, Flora (Floyd) Helling, Clara Maddox, Charlene VanWyk; brother, Norris (Marjorie) Kranich; sister-in-law, Marilyn Kelly; many nieces and nephews. The family will greet friends Friday from 10:00 am until time of service at 11:00 am at Calvary Baptist Church, Lake City. Pastor Brian Algie officiating. Interment Sherman Mesick Cemetery.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs.

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The Moped and the Ferrari

 

A doctor buys a brand new Ferrari GTO that costs him $500,000. He takes it out for a spin and stops at a red light.

An old man on a Moped, looking about 100 years old, pulls up next to him. The old man looks over at the sleek shiny car and asks, “What kind of car ya got there, sonny?”

The doctor replies, “A Ferrari GTO. It cost half a million dollars!”

“That’s a lot of money,” says the old man. “Why does it cost so much?”

“Because this car can do up to 250 miles an hour!” states the doctor proudly.

The Moped driver asks, “Mind if I take a look inside?”

“No problem,” replies the doctor.

So the old man pokes his head in the window and looks around. Then, sitting back on his Moped, the old man says, “That’s a pretty nice car, all right… but I’ll stick with my Moped!”

Just then the light changes, so the doctor decides to show the old man just what his car can do. He floors it, and within 30 seconds, the speedometer reads 150 mph. Suddenly, he notices a dot in his rear window and wonders what it could be and then…

WHHHOOOOOOSSSSSHHH! Something whips by him going much faster!

“What on earth could be going faster than my Ferrari?” the doctor asks himself. He floors the accelerator and takes the Ferrari up to 175 mph.

Then, up ahead of him, he sees that it’s the old man on the Moped! Amazed that the Moped could pass his Ferrari, he gives it more gas and passes the moped at 210 mph.

He was feeling pretty good until he looks in his mirror and sees the old man gaining on him AGAIN! Astounded by the speed of this old guy, he floors the gas pedal and takes the Ferrari all the way up to 250 mph.

Not ten seconds later, he sees the Moped bearing down on him again! The Ferrari is flat out, and there’s nothing he can do!

Suddenly, the Moped plows into the back of his Ferrari, demolishing the rear end. The doctor stops and jumps out, and unbelievably, the old man is still alive. He runs up to the mangled old man and says, “Oh my gosh! Is there anything I can do for you?”

The old man whispers, “Unhook my suspenders from your side mirror.”

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Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.

AA Meetings at Rebos House 

Rebos House, 10 N. First St., Cedar Springs is open on Sunday, 9 am, 2 pm and 7 pm. Monday, noon, 7 pm Big Book, 8:15pm, Tuesday, noon, 5:30 women’s, 7 pm men’s & women’s. Wednesday, noon, 7 pm 12X12, 8:15 pm. Thursday, noon, 7 pm, Alanon 7 pm. Friday, noon, 7 pm and Saturday, 8:30 am, 10 am, 2 pm and 7 pm. #38

Red Flannel Day Talent Show Tryouts

Sept. 24: Last chance to be a part of the Red Flannel Talent Show. We are looking for singers, vocal groups, dancers, instrumentalists and variety acts for the Red Flannel Day Talent Show on October 3rd. Come in and show us what you got. Last tryout on  Thursday September 24 at 7:00 pm at the Kent Theatre, 8 N. Main St. Cedar Springs. If you have any questions, or can’t make it on tryout day, please contact Len Allington by email, len@laphoto.com or 231-750-2337. #38

Craft & Home Business Show

Sept. 26: St. Peters Lutheran Church Craft & Home Business Show will be Saturday, September 26th from 9 am to 3 pm at 310 E. Division, Rockford, Michigan. A variety of craft and home business items offered for sale. Sponsored by St. Peter’s Ladies Guild. Public Welcome – Admission free. #37,38p

Greeting Card Party

Sept. 26: Calling ages 6 to adult to the Cedar Springs Library for a greeting card party! Make a Harvest Greeting Card or a Halloween Greeting Card on September 26th from 10:15 am – 11:15 am or 11:30 am – 12:30 pm. Stop by to reserve a spot during one of these sessions or call the Library at 616-696-1910 today! #38

Red Flannel Open Golf Tournament

Sept. 26,27: Whitefish Lake Golf & Grill is hosting the First Annual Red Flannel Open this weekend, Sept. 26-27, which will benefit the Red Flannel Queen’s Scholarship Foundation. The event is a two-day, four-man, 2X2 scramble. The tournament is flighted for all skill levels, offering a unique, fun, and competitive format. The tournament cost is $80 per player. There will be cash prizes for the tournament winners and opportunities to win other great prizes for putting, long drive and hole contests, including Whitefish Lake Golf Memberships and a FOX Ford hole-in-one, Ford Fusion, two-year lease on Sunday’s round. Call the Pro-shop (616-636-5260) to enter your team today. Let’s have fun while supporting the community. #38

Free Excel Computer Class

Sept. 29: The Cedar Springs Library is holding a Beginning Excel Computer Class for FREE on Tues., September 29 at 11 am. Please RSVP by calling 616-696-1910. The Cedar Springs Library is located at 43 W. Cherry St., Cedar Springs.

Senior Lunch 

Sept. 30: Dear Senior Friends age 60 or more.  Summer has slipped through our fingers as Fall sneaks in to takes its place.  These winds of change blew in a menu of Chicken Divan served with Banana Muffins a Salad and Jello with a dessert made with Apples.  Beware those winds may change before the meal is served.  The where and when has not changed.  At Noon the 30th of September, ride the breeze to Pine Grove Community Church at M-82 and Beech. #38

Strange, Spooky, 

Wicked Michigan

Sept. 30: Explore the mysterious side of Michigan with author and researcher Amberrose Hammond. Delve into Michigan’s ghostly lore, haunted history, forgotten criminals and strange places. Audio and video clips from investigations into the unknown will send a chill down your spine and deliver a few laughs between the goosebumps! Wednesday, September 30 at 6:30 pm at the Nelson Township/ Sand Lake KDL Branch, 88 Eighth St. #38

God’s Kitchen in Cedar Springs

Oct. 6,13,20,27: Join us for dinner every Tuesday. God’s Kitchen – Cedar Springs welcomes families from Northern Kent County and the surrounding area to a Tuesday Evening Meal. No charge – no registration required!  Served from 5:30 – 6:30 pm at the St. John Paul II Parish, 3110 – 17 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs. For more information, call the Church office at 616-696-3904. #38

Help Promote Literacy

Oct.6: The Literacy Center of West Michigan has scheduled and information session on Tuesday October 6th at 2 pm for prospective volunteer tutors. Persons interested in becoming volunteer tutors can find out more about the Center and its literacy programs. There will be an opportunity to sign up for tutor training. By training people to be tutors, the Center can offer one-on-one reading help to adults asking for assistance in reading or English as a Second Language (ESL). You do not need to speak another language. The Center is located at 1120 Monroe Ave., NW, Suite 240, Grand Rapids. Please call 616-459-5151 (ext. 10) or email us at info@literacycenterwm.org to register.

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