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Living With The Land

 

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Some people live off the land. Stories in this column are from one who strives to live with land. We cannot walk and breathe tomorrow, if we do not eat and drink today. It is essential we take from nature but is also essential that we give back to nature, if we hope to thrive in another year, decade, century, or millennium.

We personally will not see another millennium and few will see the next century. Family members in succeeding generations will be able to live healthy lives a thousand years from now, if we responsibly sustain the environment that supports us.

Living off the land might mean taking what we need or want for our interests. Living with the land does not exclude taking from nature to sustain our families but it does include allowing the land to live and breath in a manner that will provide for the needs of future generations. That defines sustainable in a very practical sense.

This column focuses on aspects of nature niche relationships with wild creatures in our yards, neighborhoods, and region to promote sustainable biodiversity. Each species holds secrets and mysteries. Some species are more essential to our lives than others but all hold a fascination that stimulates our hearts to beat stronger, happier, and with greater purpose when we know them better.

Spring is here. Life is springing forth from the ground, returning from distant winter retreats or maybe from hidden places in neighborhoods. Nature niche stories will help families experience and enjoy wild wonders in the yard. They might assist in bringing nature closer to home, heart, and mind. Simply knowing about nature is not enough. It is essential that our hearts burn with love for the natural world that gives us life.

Nature should not be something that we need to go to. It should be something we draw closer to us by how we manage yards and neighborhoods. Creation is a gift that sustains us so we have responsibility to sustain creation. Many practices in our lives are focused on living off the land instead of living with the land. We cannot hope for a better tomorrow if we fail to maintain Earth’s life giving virtues and products.

We are members of a natural community with other creatures in nature niches that provide food, water, shelter, and appropriate living space. When members of the community are lost they no longer provide services that help your family. We have a vested interest in maintaining all creatures great and small for our own interests and for the interest of our children’s children.

It is equally important to develop emotional relationships through nature walks, photography, venison on the table, trout on the line, butterflies in the garden or birds at the feeder. We each interact with the natural world differently but we all share the common purpose of maintaining biodiversity for a healthy future.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net Ody Brook, 13010 Northland Dr, Cedar Springs, MI 49319-8433.  616-696-1753.

 

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