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Archive | March, 2014

Easter Coloring Contest 2014

Hey Kids! Get out your crayons, markers or colored pencils and color the Easter Bunny and eggs… remember to be creastive! Winners will be chosen from 3 age categories: 4 and under • 5-7 years • 8-10 years

All winners will be announced in the April 17th Edition of The Cedar Springs POST, so hurry, entries have to be to The POST by Monday, April 14th at 5pm.

 

Click on bunny to enlarge and print out to color. Click on entry form to print out to enter.

EasterCC-Bunny

EasterCC-entryform

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School board hires new superintendent

red hawkBy Judy Reed

Associate Superintendent David Cairy received a standing ovation from 200 staff members, parents, and community members after his final interview Wednesday evening, but he didn’t get the votes from the Board of Education.

Instead, they voted 5-2 to hire Dr. Laura VanDuyne, a candidate from California, who has ties to the area and was looking to move back to Michigan. She has served as Executive Director of the State SELPA, Contra Costa Special Education Joint Powers Authority since 2010.

The decision angered and saddened many who were present for the interviews.

Trustees Shannon Vanderhyde and Jeff Gust were the two dissenting votes.

The board had the public fill out feedback forms after the interviews and turn them in, and the board sifted through them during recess. They then took a straw poll to see where they stood.

Vanderhyde said that she was saddened by the direction the board seemed to be moving in. She said that one of the comments on the feedback form stuck with her, that Laura would have a big learning curve. “I don’t want my three kids to have a big learning curve,” she said. “I want them to have the best of the best. With Dave, we can start tomorrow.”

Trustee Todd Hanson said he didn’t think there would be a huge learning curve, noting that staff would still be there doing a great job. “And if not, then maybe they are not as loyal as they say,” he remarked.

The remark brought a big boo from the crowd, and several people walked out.

Vanderhyde questioned why they bothered to get the feedback if they weren’t going to use it.

Trustee Joe Marckini said he must’ve gotten different feedback than Shannon, and that he was out talking to people. And if people didn’t like his decision, they could recall him.

Trustee Patricia Eary thought an outsider would bring a fresh perspective. President Brooke Nichols said she had a gut feeling about Van Duyne the first time she interviewed.

Those who voted for Van Duyne—President Brooke Nichols, Todd Hanson, Patricia Eary, Matt Shoffner, and Joe Marckini—all had good things to say about Cairy, but seemed to feel that Van Duyne had the skills to move the district forward.

Shoffner remarked that he felt the two of them working together—Van Duyne a global thinker and Cairy a detailed thinker—would make a good team.

After the official vote, the silence in the room was deafening. Trustee Shannon VanderHyde dissolved into tears.

Some members approached the board and thanked them for their work, while others left the room or talked quietly among themselves.

A committee will work on contract negotiations with Van Duyne, and then bring that back to the board for approval.

 

 

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Police seek water tower vandals

N-water-tower

By Judy Reed

 

A white water tower. A bucket of paint. An abandoned ladder. The cover of darkness. And someone who loves The Post. It was the perfect storm for a hit and run graffiti event in Cedar Springs last night.

Police are looking this morning for the person(s) who painted the logo of The Cedar Springs Post newspaper on the city’s water tower on Pine Street.

“I didn’t hear a thing,” said one neighbor. “I saw a forklift there yesterday evening, but thought they were just going to do some maintenance.”

People gawked as they drove by, causing a couple of minor traffic crashes. That’s when police discovered the vandalism.

“It’s actually pretty good,” said one officer. “I’ve never seen graffiti that looked so professional. I think we are looking for an expert.”

The graffiti also gave the city council an idea. “I think we should rent out the tower once a month to any interested business that wants to put their logo on it,” said one councilor. “It might help offset some of our budget problems.”

The councilor didn’t specify how much they might charge, but said it would be in the $2,499 range. “And they would have to paint it themselves, or we wouldn’t make any money,” he noted.

The Post editor caught up with Post publisher Lois Allen at a local hardware store, while she was trying to return some paint. “It just isn’t the right red,” she said, wiping her hand on a paint smock she was wearing. But she thought it was great that someone painted the Post logo on the water tower.  “I hope they don’t get caught,” she added.

If you have any info on who might have painted the water tower, please 616-APRIL-FOOLS.

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Founders Day celebration this weekend

Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events.

Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events.

Put on your long underwear and head out to the second annual Founders Day weekend, Friday and Saturday, March 28 and 29. The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce invites young and old alike to come out and help celebrate this special event.

The event kicks off Friday with a new addition—a children’s street fair from 4-7 p.m. at the heated tent on the corner of Main and Ash Street. There will be music, a balloon man, face painting, storytelling, and a ventriloquist/magician. There will also be carnival games and other events going on during the entire three hours such as ring toss, beanbag toss, duck pond, bucket bonanza, crafts, a log cabin to play in, a real lumberjack, model trains, wooden train sets, and a petting zoo courtesy of Double K Farms and 4H.

Saturday has more in store. The Cedar Springs Public Library will host pioneer crafts and storytelling from 10 to 1 p.m. at the Library. The Cedar Springs Historical Museum will be open from 11 to 3 p.m., and host several different presentations at the museum as well.The Saturday evening free concert is back at the Ash Street tent from 4-10 p.m. and all ages are welcome. This year’s concert features the bands Signal Trip and the Youz Guys Band. Food will be available to purchase from The Grilling Company and will feature pulled pork, brisket, and sides. Beer (including a local craft beer) and hard ciders will also be available to purchase. See ad on page 5 for details.

 

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Want to win a newspaper?

POST-Building-Front-winterN-Post-raffleThe owner of The Cedar Springs Post, Lois Allen, has been publishing the “small town” newspaper with stories and information relevant to families in the northern Kent County area for over twenty years.

Starting publication in the late 1980s, Allen is hoping to get a well-deserved rest from the newspaper business. “I could use a vacation,” said Allen. “I haven’t had one in 25 years.”

She continued, “I set out to create the best local newspaper I could, and I think I’ve done that. The Post is great. I think it’s the perfect reflection of the community spirit here and I’m proud to be a part of it,” said Allen.

But now after decades of working to keep the struggling newspaper going, she is considering her options. “I’ve tried to get in contact with Warren Buffett to see if he’s interested in adding to his collection,” Allen explained. “I’d like to retire with about a million or so, but his people told me not to call back.” With no millionaires knocking down the door, Allen has even considered possibly closing The Post. She continued, “But then I thought, why not raffle it?”

According to Allen, the holder of the winning raffle ticket would “win” the newspaper. “Just think. You’d have your very own newspaper! You could put yourself on the front page every week. Or you could oust your neighbor for letting their dog crap in your yard. Think of the power you would hold!”

“You could say, ‘Stop the presses!’ every single day!” said Allen.

Readers or non-readers of The Post are eligible to enter and get their once in a lifetime chance at winning a real newspaper. And, as Allen says, there aren’t that many left. “They’re practically a collector’s item for the rich and famous.”

For just $10 a ticket, anyone can have a good shot at being a big shot in a small town. You could call Donald Trump and offer to “Do lunch.” And, unlike the lottery, the odds are very good at winning. Almost as good as hitting a pothole on your way to work.

Although the newspaper would be “free” to the winner, keeping it would not. According to Allen, the new publisher would be responsible for the operating funds needed to keep the weekly paper going once they took possession. She explained, “You’ll need money for stuff like, you know, rent, payroll, postage, printing five thousand copies weekly, the insurance, utilities, internet, office equipment, computer hardware and software, and stuff like that.”

“You might want to start with some serious operating cash,” she explained. “Or you can save a ton of money if you just do everything yourself.”

For a chance to enjoy ownership of a real newspaper and live the dream, that never, ever ends, look in The Post, April 1st issue for special details on, “I want to win a newspaper!”

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Want to earn some fast cash?

N-Fast-CashIt’s quick. It’s easy. All you have to do is read the newspaper. That’s right! Read the stories and read the ads (download our e-edition to view ads http://www.cedarspringspost.com/pdf/ThePOST1314.pdf). Identify the fake ads (2 of them), AND the fake stories (4 of them) and you could win a fast $20! Email us at news@cedarspringspost.com with your guesses by Monday, March 31, at 5 p.m. Include your name, address and phone number in the email. Or you can drop off your entry here at 36 E. Maple. One winner will be chosen out of all the correct entries received by the deadline.

 

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Post goes to Washington

N-Post-goes-to-Washington-webJoan Maycroft and her daughter, Renee Sizemore, took the Post and went on a trip to visit Joan’s mother in Pasco, Washington, in January. Pasco is located in the southeast part of Washington, in what is known as the Tri-Cities area—it includes Pasco, Richland and Kennewick.

“They are located at the spot where the Snake River and the mighty Columbia Rivers converge, an area rich in agriculture and fishing,” explained Maycroft.

She said her daughter wanted to see the mountains, which they saw plenty of when they took a road trip along the Columbia River in Oregon, where they were able to see Mount Hood and Mount Baker.

Thanks for taking us with you, Joan!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

 

 

 

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Creative Technologies Kindergarten Teacher receives award

Meredith Lange of the Down Syndrome Association of West Michigan presented Lauren Bostic with the Educator of the Year Award.

Meredith Lange of the Down Syndrome Association of West Michigan presented Lauren Bostic with the Educator of the Year Award.

The CTA team of teachers supporting the kindergarten class and two students with Down syndrome. (L to R) Sarah Classen, special education teacher; Lauren Bostic, kindergarten teacher and award recipient; Grace Middlebrook, student; Adyson Merritt, student; Susan VanEnk, teacher aide.

The CTA team of teachers supporting the kindergarten class and two students with Down syndrome. (L to R) Sarah Classen, special education teacher; Lauren Bostic, kindergarten teacher and award recipient; Grace Middlebrook, student; Adyson Merritt, student; Susan VanEnk, teacher aide.

In recognition of World Down Syndrome Day on March 21, the Down Syndrome Association of West Michigan (DSAWM) recognized and honor Lauren Bostic, kindergarten teacher at Creative Technologies Academy (CTA) in Cedar Springs, with West Michigan’s Educator of the Year Award.

“We are thrilled to present this award to Lauren. Her commitment to serving the needs of her students is exemplified both in and out of the classroom, said Executive Director of DSAWM, Melissa Werkman. “Focused on recognizing teachers who include students with Down syndrome in learning opportunities in classrooms with typically developing peers, enhancing the lives of students through educational practices and serving as role models for their fellow educators, this award was initiated to bring attention to the many teachers in our service area, such as Lauren, who work tirelessly every day to improve the learning environment for students with special needs.”

Katie Merritt, whose seven-year-old daughter, Adyson, has Down syndrome and has been in Lauren’s class for two years, nominated Bostic. In her nomination, she shared that Bostic takes the time to learn methods that the different therapists are using and incorporates those for her entire class to use. For instance, her students do not always stand in a straight line and walk to their destination, but instead, they incorporate various gross motor skills and walk like a bear or a crab in order to use different muscles and complement what the therapists are doing. Merritt also noted the extra attention Lauren invested during the summer by continuing to meet with Adyson on a regular basis.

“We all know our children hold amazing potential, but without the help of great teachers and staff, that potential can never be achieved. We are so thankful for everything that Miss Bostic, Mrs. VanEnk and all the staff at CTA have done to support our children,” commented Merritt.

CTA held a presentation on March 21 for its kindergarten through eighth grade students to recognize Lauren and also to bring awareness to Down syndrome.

“Miss Bostic has been a dedicated teacher at Creative Technologies Academy since 2008. Her compassion and skills in working with young children are phenomenal,” said Dan George, CTA Superintendent. “She has a wonderful ability to work with students with special needs and she is devoted to helping her students succeed to their maximum ability.”

 

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Nobody Wins the $1,000,000!

money

Nobody came forward to point out the misspelled word in our last issue. Too bad. We would have awarded a large cash prize, probably $1,000,000.

Don’t start looking for it now. It’s too late for that. Just let this be a lesson to you. Don’t procrastinate on important stuff.

Actually, The Post staff is rather glad nobody found the word and won the prize. We’ve had a great time spending the money on ourselves this week. Lavish Parties, expensive clothes, fast boats. You should see the Llamborgini sports car parked in front of our office.

Maybe we’ll misspell another word some time. Be on the lookout.

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Whose pothole is it anyway?

N-April-Fools-PotHoleA dispute over legal boundaries has left motorists dodging a crater in the middle of the road and no one to appeal to.

A pothole at White Creek and Shady Lane has been steadily growing this winter, in part due to an underground spring. The other reason is lack of road maintenance. And that won’t be remedied anytime soon, because the pothole is—quite literally—in no man’s land.

With road budgets dwindling and projects being scaled back, the city and townships began looking at critical areas to repair. While looking at this particular intersection, the city discovered that due to a legal technicality, it was not included in the 425 agreement with Solon Township and therefore not in the city’s jurisdiction.

“We’ve been maintaining that intersection for years,” said a city spokesperson. “But we can’t afford to use taxpayer money to repair something that doesn’t belong to us.”

Solon Township disagrees with that perspective. “They should honor the spirit of the agreement,” they said. “There is nothing in that agreement that shows it belongs to us either.”

In the meantime, drivers are getting flat tires and bottoming out in the hole. “It’s really bad when it snows because you can’t see the hole,” said one driver, who has had his car in the shop three times due to the pothole.  “It’s ridiculous that they can’t fix it. Does someone have to get hurt?”

Kent County was contacted to see if they could help repair the road, but they said they don’t have the money for anything north of 14 Mile Road.

A new community group called the “Shady Lane pothole initiative” is looking for donations of cash to help solve the problem. They plan to hold a meeting on Tuesday, April 1 at a local tavern to discuss whether to use the cash to fill the hole or use the money to pay for their drinks.

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