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Archive | October, 2013

Red Hawks roll over Yellow Jackets

Photo by Kelly Alvesteffer

Photo by Kelly Alvesteffer

By Kendra Coons 

On Friday, October 25, the Cedar Springs Red Hawk Varsity football team played their last game of the season at Greenville high school. The final score of the game was 24-14 in favor of the Red Hawks. The team finished the season with a record of 5-4 in overall play and 3-2 in conference play.

Cedar Springs came out in the first quarter and scored making the game 6-0 and then scored a two point conversion making it 8-0. Greenville came back in the second quarter and scored two touchdowns. Greenville took the lead going into halftime 14-8. Neither teams scored in the third quarter. In the fourth quarter, Cedar Springs came fighting back and scored 16 more points making the final score of the game 24-14.

On offense, Cedar Springs had a total of 14 first downs, gained 184 yards while rushing, and had possession of the ball for 26:55. Senior Jeff Newland, and junior Mavrick Cotton both scored for the Red Hawks. Jeff Newland had a total of 73 net yards while rushing. Junior Kaden Myers wasn’t far behind him with 55, and senior Dylan Block also contributed with 17. Senior quarterback, Austin Hilyer, also scored a touchdown for the Red Hawks. On punt returns, junior, Mavrick Cotton ran for 14 yards and Kaden Myers ran for 32 yards.

On defense, Jeff Newland led the team with 10 tackles. Seniors Jordan Johnson, Nick Krajewski and junior Caden Burrows, came in with a total of five for the game. The team had a total of 53 tackles against the Yellow Jackets. Mavrick Cotton also had a pass interception for five yards.

“It was a great game, I’m very happy that our seniors could go out with a win over Greenville like that,” comments Coach Gus Kapolka. “It was a great feeling in the locker room after the game. Everybody was very satisfied with the outcome.”

The Red Hawks football season is officially over and the community of Cedar Springs wishes the best to our seniors, and also good luck to the Red Hawks football program next year.

 

Posted in SportsComments Off

Leaf Experiences

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

The best learning is a family experience with fun. I was raking leaves and thought about my girls helping or thinking they were helping. Then I thought about when I helped my dad rake leaves or thought I was helping. What I remember best from both experiences is that I jumped into the pile of leaves and buried myself and my girls jumped into the leaf pile and buried themselves.

A difference in our experiences was what happened to leaves—Earth Stewardship. In the 1950’s people up and down the block raked leaves into the road and burned them. My girls learned leaves make good compost and should not be burned. As mulch they decay and release nutrients into the soil or garden rather than into the air. We used leaves to spread on trails at Ody Brook to prevent dirt from getting in the soles of shoes.

A great experience helps kids observe the intricate natural world. They see details and gain basic knowledge, comprehend what they experience, apply experiences to life at home and in the community, analyze what is best, synthesize what they experienced to use for new unrelated purposes, and then evaluate the value.

The experience allows discovery. I did a leaf activity with students when I was classroom teacher and at the Howard Christensen Nature Center. In fall we found a sugar maple and each student collected ten leaves and then we found a silver maple and collected ten more leaves.

In the process the students learned to distinguish leaf similarities and differences for the two species. Learning more about adaptations for the species took us deeper into reasoning and mental development. Students compared the amount of substance in the two kinds of leaves to discover that silver maple leaves were lighter with less substance. They curled and shrivel more than the heavier sturdy sugar maple leaves. We weighed the leaves and found sugar maple leaves were heavier.

I shared that sugar maple leaves do not remove most of the nutrients from the leaves but allow nutrients to fall to ground in the leaf, where they rot under the tree to release nutrients for the tree’s use in spring. Silver maples ship a greater proportion of nutrients to the roots with the sap, and store it until spring for new growth. Both species have unique nature niche strategies for recycling nutrients. Silver maples are floodplain trees and their leaves wash away with spring flooding so nutrients would be lost if dropped with leaves. Sugar Maples are upland plants and their leaves stay near the tree and release nutrients to their own roots.

My dad, like most other dads, did not realize that releasing nutrients into the air by burning leaves contributes to air pollution and increased atmospheric carbon. I like fires and “some-mores” so we burn branches cleared during trail maintenance and make our “some-more” treats. We allow many to decay in the woods to replenish soil health. Most nutrients are in the small branches that decay rapidly so we leave those in the woods and burn some larger branches. We use large branches for brush pile construction for bird and mammal shelters.

Create family experiences and build relationships. Our kids are grown but I still desire help with projects at Ody Brook. I can use the help but more importantly I think it continues to build our relationship. Of course, their lives are full and busy but sometimes we still build relationships working together outdoors.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at the odybrook@chartermi.net Ody Brook, 13010 Northland Dr, Cedar Springs, MI 49319-8433.

 

Posted in Awesome Autumn, Ranger Steve's Nature NicheComments Off

Fresh Market-Jack o’ the Lantern

AWE-JackolanternBy Vicky Babcock

 

Most of us have heard the story of the wily rascal, Jack, and how he tricked the devil and thereby secured his own soul. Many versions of the tale exist, but all agree on the conclusion that Jack—having barred himself from hell and being unworthy of heaven—was made to wander the world, a lost soul.

One such tale suggests that Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. Not wanting to pay for his drink, Jack convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that he would use to buy the drinks. But Jack instead put the coin into his pocket next to a cross, which prevented the Devil from turning back. Jack agreed to release the Devil on the condition that the Devil never take his soul.  When Jack passed away, he found himself barred from heaven. The devil had provided him with a lit coal in which to light his way. Jack placed his coal into a carved out turnip and so the practice of Jack o’ lanterns began.

In truth, the practice began long before the story of Jack. Carved vegetables, usually turnips or beets, were used in celebrations around the world for centuries.  Wikipedia associates the term jack-o’-lantern with ignis fatuus (foolish fire) named for the phenomenon of strange flickering light over peat bogs.  You may have heard it called the will-o’-the-wisp. Gourds were the choice of the Maori, who used the carved fruit as lanterns over 700 years ago.  s gourds (the pumpkin is one) are the earliest produce known to be cultivated by man—dating back over 10,000 years—it is likely the practice of carving lanterns from them extends back thousands of years.  Irish immigrants have been credited with bringing the practice to the United States however, where they discovered the pumpkin made a much better media than the turnips they used in their home country.

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the Celtic festival of Samhain—the celebration of their new year, the day of the dead—which took place on November 1. The day marked the harvest, the end of summer and the beginning of the dark, cold winter. The Celts believed that on the eve of their new year the bounderies between the world of the living and the world of the dead became blurred and the dead could return to earth. The advent of Christianity changed and blended with the old rites. November 1 eventually became All Saints Day and November 2 All Souls’ Day to honor the dead. It is commonly believed that the church was attempting to replace the Celtic traditions with more sanctioned beliefs and the two holidays share many aspects, including bonfires, parades and dressing in costume. All Saints’ Day, or All-hallowmas—from Middle English for All Saint’s Day—has itself changed to include more of its pagan roots.  All Hallows Eve, or Halloween as we know it today, became the date of choice and the Jack-o-lanterns we all love, once used to frighten the dead and demons away from our doors, can be found on doorsteps everywhere. Trick or Treat, a mostly American tradition, probably resulted from the old practice of feeding the dead.

You’ve most likely carved your pumpkins for this year. Next year, consider saving the bits of carved out fruit (minus the peal) and throwing it into a pot of chili for a healthy and tasty addition. And the seeds—well we all know what pumpkin seeds are good for.

Have a safe and Happy Halloween, everyone—and Happy Haunting!

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

If you’ve never had pumpkin seeds, you’re in for a treat!  While these are great simply roasted and salted, you can make them your own by adding your own special blend of spices. If you’ve already carved your pumpkins, consider purchasing another. Roasted or baked pumpkin makes a great addition to soups and stews, breads, cookies and pies.

Basic ingredients:

Approximately 1 ½ c. pumpkin seeds

2 or 3 tsp. melted butter or olive oil

Salt

Optional choices (partial list):

A dash or two of soy sauce

Garlic powder

Seasoned salt (I like Morton’s)

Chili powder or cayenne pepper

Pre-heat oven to 300◦ Fahrenheit.  Rinse seeds thoroughly in a colander under running water, removing the majority of pulp and strings.  In a medium bowl, toss together seeds, oil or melted butter and seasons of your choice.  You can also make a sweetened version by substituting sugar and cinnamon.

Spread seeds out onto a baking sheet and bake for 40-45 minutes, or until golden, stirring occasionally. Once these start to brown, they will do so quickly, so be sure to keep an eye on them. Cooking times are approximate.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

Posted in Awesome Autumn, Halloween fun, RecipesComments Off

Ski swap and equipment sale fundraiser

As winter weather approaches, West Michigan Ski Patrols gear up for the largest ski swap fundraiser in the state of Michigan. The 42nd annual ski/snowboard swap and equipment sale will take place November 8, 9 and 10 at Cannonsburg Ski Area located at 6800 Cannonsburg Road, Belmont, Michigan, 49306.

The 42nd annual sale is a fundraiser to benefit the nonprofit ski patrols of West Michigan, including the Cannonsburg Ski Patrol, Pando Ski Patrol, and the West Michigan Nordic Ski Patrol. Commissions earned from the sale go to purchase first aid supplies and life-saving equipment used to evacuate injured guests in the event of an accident or emergency. Ski Patrols do not charge for emergency care, are volunteers, and no funding from county or community.

There will be thousands of pieces of new and gently used equipment at bargain prices. Clothes, downhill skis, snowboards, cross country skis, boots, coats, hats, gloves, and accessories for all winter activities will be available on a first come first serve basis. Doors are open to the public Friday November 8 and Saturday November 9 from 10:00a.m.-9:00 p.m. and on Sunday November 10 from 11:00 am.-2:00 p.m. (Please Note: There will be no sale on Thursday November 7.)

Check in for items to be entered in this year’s swap will take place at Cannonsburg Ski Area November 4, 5 and 6 from 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. The cost to enter items in the sale is $2 per 10 items with a 25 percent commission going to the ski patrol for each item sold. The ski swap does not accept straight skis, older bindings or damaged equipment.

For more information about the swap, please contact Kevin Barrons at (616) 293 5717 or by e-mail kabarrons@comcast.net.

Posted in Arts & EntertainmentComments Off

Rep. VerHeulen to hold office hours in Sparta

State Rep. Rob VerHeulen, R-Walker, announced he will be available to meet with constituents for office hours in November.

Office hours will take place in Grandville on Saturday, Nov. 2 at Rainbow Grill, 4158 Chicago Dr. SW, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. and in Sparta on Saturday, Nov. 23 at Maxine’s Family Restaurant, 370 N State St. from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

“I always look forward to my office hours each month,” VerHeulen said. “It gives me an opportunity to leave the office and meet residents in person.”

If residents are unable to attend Rep. VerHeulen’s office hours, feel free to contact his Lansing office for more information at (517) 373-8900 or email RobVerHeulen@house.mi.gov.

Posted in Arts & EntertainmentComments Off

Hometown Happenings

Hometown Happenings articles are a community service for non-profit agencies only. Due to popular demand for placement in this section, we can no longer run all articles. Deadline for articles is Monday at 5 p.m. This is not guaranteed space. Articles will run as space allows. Guaranteed placement is $10, certain restrictions may apply. You now can email your Hometown Happenings to happenings@cedarspringspost.com please include name and phone number for any questions we may have.

 

Trunk or Treat inside at The Springs

Oct. 31: Creative costumes—check. Oodles of goodies—check. Lots of giggles and loads of fun—doublecheck! You’ll experience it all at The Springs Church at Trunk or Treat on Halloween night from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be lots of candy for the taking, carnival games, hot chocolate, cider and donuts. It will be fun for the whole family. The church is located at 135 N. Grant St., in Cedar Springs.

 

Family Harvest Celebration

Oct. 31: Pine Ridge Bible Camp invites you to join us at the annual Family Harvest Celebration on October 31st from 6 – 8pm. This FREE event includes candy, games, gospel magician, wagon rides, cider, treats and lot of fun decorations. It is a fun night for the whole family. Cider and Treats will be served in our new dining hall so this is a great chance to see the new building and connect with friends. www.pineridgecamp.com. #42,43,44

 

Annual Fall Festival at Cedar Springs United Methodist Church

Nov. 2: The Cedar Springs United Methodist Church Women’s Group is having their annual Fall Festival on Saturday, November 2nd from 9AM to 2PM. Come start your Christmas shopping with us. We will have crafts, gently used jewelry, books, toys, knick knacks, Christmas decorations along with cookies. Proceeds are going to the CS United Methodist Women’s missions. #42,43,44b

 

GriefShare Seminar

Nov. 3: GriefShare “Surviving the Holidays” seminar will be offered at Cedar Springs United Methodist Church (140 S. Main) on Sunday, November 3 beginning at 3 pm in our Parlor (upstairs from the south side entrance). This seminar is designed to help those who have lost a loved one through death during the holiday season. We hope that you can join us for this encouraging time. For more information, call the church office at 616-696-1140. #44

 

Dinner at the Legion

Nov. 4: American Legion, 80 Main St. Cedar Springs, is hosting a swiss steak dinner on Monday, October 7th, from 5 – 7 pm. Included will be mashed potatoes & gravy, baked beans, veggies, salad, dessert and drinks. All dinners are $9, children $4.50. Enjoy home cooking. Take out is available. 616-696-9160. #44

 

Food Drive at Metron

Nov. 4-18: Metron of Cedar Springs, located at 400 Jeffery, will be hosting a food drive November 4 through November 18. All donated food items will be given to area church food pantries located in the Cedar Springs area. If you should have any questions concerning the food drive, please contact Billie Vanderlaan, Community Relations Coordinator at 616-204-2615. #44

 

Fundraiser for CS Fire Truck

Nov. 6: Join the Cedar Springs Firefighters from 5 to 8 p.m. in a fundraiser dinner on November 6 to refurbish the 1929 Model AA Fire Engine. Call the fire station at 696-1221 and leave a message requesting location and ticket prices. #44

 

Full Moon: Stuck in a Rut

Nov. 7: Learn basic biology details of Michigan’s favorite mammal: the white-tailed deer. Learn what really happens during the rut from the deer’s point of view. Thursday, November 7 from 7 to 8:30 pm at Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16190 Red Pine Drive, Kent City. $5 donation. www.lilysfrogpad.com. #44

 

CPR Certification Class

Nov. 8: A class will be held on Friday Nov 8 from 2-5pm for those 12 years and older. It is taught by Spectrum Health United Lifestyles.Cost is $40 and pre-registration is mandatory. For more information call the Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recreation Office at 696-7320 or log onto www.csaparksandrec.com and check out the enrichment programs. #43,44

 

Pine Ridge Bible Camp Auction Fundraiser

Nov. 9: Pine Ridge Bible Camp is holding their annual Silent and Live Auction Fundraiser on Saturday, November 9 at Cedar Springs High School Cafeteria, 204 E. Muskegon St. Registration begins at 5:30 followed by a large silent auction; the evening ends with a live auction. For more information, please call Pine Ridge Bible Camp at 616-696-8675. #44

 

Annual Cookie Walk and Christmas Delites Sale

Nov. 9: Holy Spirit Episcopal is holding its annual Cookie Walk and Christmas Delites sale on Saturday, November 9 from 9 am to 3 pm. The church is located at 1200 Post Drive in Belmont, at the corner of Post and Pine Island Drive, just west of the Belmont exit off US131. We’ll have a cookie walk, baked goods, crafts, Santa’s Attic, and a silent auction featuring several items, including a beautiful queen sized Double Irish Chain quilt and 2 shams made by our parishioners. Fund support various church activities. #44

 

Holiday Bazaar at Bethel Lutheran Church

Nov. 9: Bethel Lutheran Church will host a Holiday Bazaar on Saturday November 9 from 9 am to 2 pm. Located on M-46, just east of Old 131 (Federal Road). Local crafters, bake sale, card corner, Christmas decorations, drawings for quilt and craft items. Breakfast and lunch will be served. Free child care for shoppers. This is an excellent time to start your Christmas shopping and have a fun filled day. #44

 

Solon Center Wesleyan Church Bazaar 

Nov. 16: Accomplish your Christmas shopping at our annual craft bazaar. Saturday, November 16th from 9 am to 3 pm. Lots of vendors (our largest bazaar in many years). Delicious, fresh baked cookies and bars, numerous booths of hand crafted items and jewelry, and many other vendors. There’s definitely something for everyone. Rolls and coffee, and a lunch counter are also available. The church is located at 15671 Algoma Avenue, just north of 19 Mile Road. #44-46p

 

 

Posted in Hometown HappeningsComments (1)

Impressive Dinner

 

A young man called his mother and announced excitedly that he had just met the woman of his dreams. Now what should he do?

His mother had an idea. “Why don’t you send her flowers, and on the card invite her to your apartment for a home-cooked meal?”

He thought this was a great strategy, and a week later, the woman came to dinner. His mother called the next day to see how things had gone.

“I was totally humiliated,” he moaned. “She insisted on washing the dishes.”

“What’s wrong with that?” asked his mother.

“We hadn’t started eating yet.”

 

Posted in Joke of the WeekComments Off

From the Mayor’s Desk

Mayor Bob Truesdale

Mayor Bob Truesdale

By Bob Truesdale, Mayor

The City of Cedar Springs

 

First, my condolences to the Mike and Alice Holton family. You should be mighty proud to be the children and kin of such a caring couple. Cedar Springs and Red Flannels was a great part of their lives, and they showed it in so many ways that can’t be named or counted. Thank you, Mike and Alice, so very much for your love and example to we that remain.

In June of this year, I asked my wife to send an email to my fellow council members that started with the statement, “Depending on your support, I might become known in the future, as the Mayor who served the shortest term in office, for delving into the problems John and Mary Taxpayer experience. I asked for their support and it backfired, with my getting called on the carpet for editorials in the Post.

As kids in Sunday School we sang, “Dare to be a Daniel, Dare to stand alone, Dare to have a purpose firm, Dare to make it known.” Daring to be a Daniel is not always easy, but I stand by the statements I made; length of time served as your Mayor means nothing to me. If it turns out to be only a one-year tenure, so be it. You won’t find me crying, for in God’s sight, I have given it my very best, with the abilities He gave me.

My promise to you: I will continue to serve with a good attitude, in any capacity, for an all-new Cedar Springs in 2014.

Thanks for your prayers and support,

Your friend and present Mayor

 

Posted in From your Mayor's DeskComments Off

Man cleared in credit card fraud case

The Montcalm County Sheriff Department has officially cleared a man that should never have been considered a suspect in a credit card fraud case in Howard City.

A Nixle alert was sent out by the Howard City Police last week, with a surveillance photo showing the man and asking for the public’s assistance to find him. The man, Matt Bowhuis, came forward and told police he was innocent. The Sheriff’s Office then asked us to take down the posting on our web page, and said they were going to interview him further to rule him out. We agreed to do that, and took the story off both our web and Facebook pages.

Det. Tom Goerge confirmed to the Post on Wednesday, October 30, that they had interviewed Matt Bowhuis, and that he had indeed been cleared as a suspect. Det. Goerge said that the timing was off on the store’s camera, leading to an incorrect suspect photo being circulated.

Posted in NewsComments Off

Motorcyclist injured in crash with car

N-Car vs Motorcycle Kent County Sheriff badgeUPDATED October 25 with corrections regarding motorcyclist’s injuries:

A motorcyclist suffered severe injuries after a car collided with him Saturday afternoon, October 19.

According to Sgt. Ben Cammenga, of the Kent County Sheriff’s Department, Michael Streeter, 55, of Sparta, was traveling southbound on White Creek Avenue, south of 17 Mile, when a northbound vehicle tried to turn left into Big Boy, and turned in front of the motorcycle, causing them to collide.

AeroMed was put on standby, but later cancelled. A call from the family confirmed that Streeter suffered a broken back, broken ribs, and a collapsed lung. He was in intensive care until Friday, October 25, and will move to Mary Free Bed for rehabilitation when he is better.

The driver of the vehicle, Jeffrey VanderKlipp, 48, of Rockford, was not injured.

Posted in NewsComments (2)

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