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Categorized | Outdoors

Ladies’ guided pheasant hunt Oct. 27 in Belding

Ladies, grab your shotgun, ammo, boots and hunter orange and join a guided pheasant hunt this fall.

On Sunday, Oct. 27, the DNR and Gourmet Gone Wild—along with Pine Hills Kennels and Sportsman’s Club and the Barry County, Grand Valley and Montcalm County chapters of Pheasants Forever—will, host a ladies’ pheasant hunt at 3329 Johnson Road in Belding.

Registration and coffee begins at 9 a.m. The day’s events will include warming up with shooting at sporting clays, hunting with a guide for two pheasants, learning to clean your birds, enjoying a gourmet lunch and taking home a gift.

Beginners are welcome, and guns can be made available if needed. Registration is limited to 12 ladies 18 years of age or older. The cost for the day is $35 per person.
Pre-registration is required. Please call Scott Brosier at 616-874-8459 to sign up.

Established in 1975, Pine Hill Sportsman’s Club offers its members some of the finest in upland bird hunting anywhere on four farms totaling over 600 acres. Pine Hill’s intensive land management program not only benefits the population of free-ranging upland birds, but also enhances the habitat for deer, turkey and waterfowl.
Gourmet Gone Wild (GGW), a partnership between the DNR, Michigan State University and the Michigan United Conservation Clubs, introduces Michigan’s urban and suburban young professionals (between the ages of 21-39) to conservation, stewardship, hunting and fishing through the locavore movement. Gourmet wild fish and game tastings bring young professionals together and help connect them to hands-on experience and mentorship. To learn more about Gourmet Gone Wild and Gourmet Gone Wilder programs, visit www.gourmetgonewild.org.

Pheasants Forever, including its quail conservation division, Quail Forever, is the nation’s largest nonprofit organization dedicated to upland habitat conservation. Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever have more than 135,000 members and 740 local chapters across the United States and Canada. Chapters are empowered to determine how 100 percent of their locally raised conservation funds are spent, making it the only national conservation organization that operates through this truly grassroots structure.

 

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