web analytics

Categorized | Featured, News

Romney and Santorum split delegates in Michigan

Mitt Romney at rally at Byrne Electrical in Rockford Monday. Photo by B. Altena.

Sinking fund millage passes

By Judy Reed

UPDATE 3/2: A Michigan Republican Party Committee says they made an error in splitting the delegates between Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum, and instead are now awarding the two “at large” delegates to  Romney. Former Attorney General Mike Cox, who chairs the Credential Committee reportedly said they changed their mind and changed the rules, but Party Chair Saul Anuzis said they merely ratified a decision from earlier this month. The Santorum campaign is protesting the decision. See the letter from Republican Party Chair Anuzis at:

http://www.thatssaulfolks.com/2012/03/01/saul-anuziss-statement-on-michigans-delegate-allocation/

ORIGINAL STORY:

It was a neck-in-neck presidential primary race between Republican contenders Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum Tuesday in Michigan, but in the end, the two ended up splitting Michigan’s 30 delegates.

Overall, Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, received 409,120 votes to win the popular vote. Rick Santorum, a former US Senator from Pennsylvania, received 377,144 votes. Both, however, each won 7 of the states 14 Congressional districts.

Romney made an appearance in Rockford at Byrne Electrical in Rockford Monday (see story on page 2), but Santorum still got the most votes in Kent County—30,782 to 29,238. Cities and townships in our area where Santorum carried the vote included the cities of Cedar Springs and Rockford, and the townships of Algoma, Courtland, Nelson, Oakfield, Solon, Sparta, and Spencer.

Also on the ballot was a sinking fund millage for repairs at Cedar Springs Public Schools. The issue passed by a narrow margin of only 40 votes—1,624 voted yes, and 1,584 voted no. Last spring a similar request was defeated by 55 votes. But in that election, only about 1,300 voters showed up.

“We are really excited about the turnout,” said Assistant Superintendent David Cairy. “It shows you that people were concerned about the issue.”

The proposal was for a levy not to exceed 1 mill ($1 on each $1,000 of taxable value) for 10 years to create a sinking fund for the renovation, remodeling or repair of school buildings and other purposes authorized by law. They told the Post one of their main priorities is fixing school campus roads and expanding parking at a couple of the buildings. They estimated they would raise $521,000 in the first year.

Cairy said they want to be thoughtful about where the money goes, and to spend appropriately. He noted that they would continue to rely on the community group that helped them prioritize their needs. “We want to listen to the folks that are giving us the funds,” he explained.

Superintendent Ron McDermed was gratified with the results and thanked all those who worked hard on the issue. “As a result of this vote, the Board of Education and our school community will be able to keep our dollars on the kids in the classroom,” he said in a press release. “As a community, we have invested millions in our facilities over the past few years. This levy will ensure that this investment is maintained.”

 

This post was written by:

- who has written 8261 posts on Cedar Springs Post Newspaper.


Contact the author

Comments are closed.