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Archive | January, 2012

Virginia M. Bliss

Virginia M. Bliss, 92 of Pierson, went to be with her Lord, whom she loved on Friday, January 20, 2012 at Spectrum Health – United Memorial Campus, Greenville. Mrs. Bliss was born April 22, 1919 in Grand Rapids, MI the daughter of Phylo and Ila Bell (Sales) Fletcher. She was preceded in death by her loving husband, Leland Bliss on July 5, 2010 after 72 years of marriage. She spent her life as a loving wife, mother and person. Surviving are her children, Janet Glidden of Cutlerville, Lanette Stevens of Edmore, Muriel Kay Hoover of Grand Rapids, Irving (Elizabeth) Bliss of Sand Lake, Hazel (David) Hawley of Cedar Springs, Ila (Ron) Fisk of Sand Lake, Leland (Debra) Bliss of Cedar Springs, Sherrie (Jeff) Peters of Cedar Springs; 110 grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren; brother-in-law, Arthur (Delores) Bliss; sister-in-law, Althea Welch; many nieces and nephews. The family received friends on Monday from 6-8 pm at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs, where services were held on Tuesday 11:00 am. Pastor Larry Young officiating. Interment in the spring at Solon Township Cemetery. Arrangements by Bliss Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs

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Story of Fanny Crosby at the Kent

Songs in the night Feb. 3-4

Songs in the night, a historical biography depicting the life of one of America’s most well-known and beloved song writer’s—Fanny Crosby—will be performed at the Kent Theatre on February 3 and 4 by the Senior High Koinonia Players.
The play, written by Robert Henninger and directed by Ruth Andrus, tells how while overcoming the tragic accident that blinded her, Crosby saw deep into the heart of God and shared that vision in songs. As the story follows this woman’s life through the mid 1800s, there is both humor and tragedy. The play brings an eternal message of perseverance and love, and will be a memorable experience for both the cast and audience.
Showtimes are at 3 and 7 p.m. on Friday, February 3; and at 2 and 7 p.m. on Saturday, February 4. Tickets are $5.
For more info, call Ruth at (616) 901-0749.

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This week’s happenings

TOPS weight loss support group
Jan. 31: Take off pounds sensibly (TOPS), a non-profit weight loss sport group for men and women, meets every Tuesday at the Resurrection Lutheran Church in Sand Lake. Your first visit is free so come check out what TOPS can do to help you reach your weight loss goals! Exercise 8-8:30am (optional), weigh-ins from 8:30am–9am and the meeting starts at 9:15am. In case of inclemeent weather, meetings are cancelled if Tri-County or Cedar Sporings schools are closed. Call Martha at 696-1039 for more information. #4

Play Auditions for Rogue River Community Theatre
Feb. 1: The Rogue River Community Theatre are hosting auditions on Wed. Feb. 1st from 6 – 8:30 pm at the Community Center, 8450 Shaner, Rockford, for “The Ragweed Blues” an American Comedy. Looking for actors of all ages. Contact the Theatre 616-874-5264 for details.  #4

Al Bogner Benefit
Feb. 4: A benefit of Al Bogner will be held on Sat. Feb. 4 at the Newaygo VFW (1 mile south of Newago on M-37). A live auction starts at 2 pm. There will be a DJ and live music, bake sale, craft table, pop & candy booths. Soup & Baked potato Bar at 6 pm, with ham sandwiches, salads, coffee and punch. Al Bogner has been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer and we are hoping to raise money for repairs to the home and transportation to doctor appointments. Any remaining funds will go to living and funeral expenses. For more information call Mary Jo Hanes, 231-834-1821 or Nora Sokolowski, 616-636-7144.  #4,5p

Daddy-Daughter Dance
Feb. 4: Come have a ball at the annual Daddy Daughter Dance on Saturday, February 4, 7-9pm at the Cedar Springs Middle School. Pre-purchased tickets $15 for couples, $18 for groups of three, $20 for groups of four. Tickets at the door $20 for couples, and $25 for three or more.  Purchase tickets at Cedar Springs Area Parks & Recreation office on Tuesday and Wednesday 8:30am-3pm or at the Middle School Monday-Thursday nights 6-9pm. #4

Get Out – Enjoy Winter: Snowshoeing for Beginners
Feb. 5: What a better way to get out and enjoy our Michigan winters than to experience it on showshoes. Join Susan and Harry as they guide you through the process of learning how to showshoe (it’s so easy!). A guided hike around the nature center property on Sunday Feb. 5 from 10:30 -12:30 pm will give you some practice with the new footgear and a chance to learn about our winter world. Cost: 5/ person or $10 family (of four or more). Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16190 Red Pine Dr. Kent City. If interested simply email cperski@lilysfrogpad.com.  #4

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Boot Lesson

A teacher was helping one of her kindergarten students put his boots on.
The little boy had asked for help and she could see why. With her pulling and him pushing, the boots still didn’t want to go on.
When the second boot was on, she had worked up a sweat. She almost whimpered when the little boy said, “Teacher, they’re on the wrong feet.”
She looked and sure enough, they were. It wasn’t much easier pulling the boots off than it was putting them on. She managed to keep her cool as together they worked to get the boots back on—this time on the right feet.
He then announced, “These aren’t my boots.”  She bit her tongue rather than get right in his face and scream, “Why didn’t you say so?” like she wanted to. Once again she struggled to help him pull the ill-fitting boots off.
He then said, “They’re my brother’s boots. My Mom made me wear them.” The teacher didn’t know if she should laugh or cry.  She mustered up the grace to wrestle the boots on his feet again.
She said, “Now, where are your mittens?”
“Oh!” he remarked, with a toothless grin. “I tuffed them in the toes of my boots!”

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Great new job idea
How about hiring real people to answer business phones?
Most big companies have computers answering their phones. Voice prompts may sound like real people, but we all know they aren’t. And when you push a button you just get a different computer.
Sometimes the computer says, “Our staff is busy with other calls. Please stay on the line and someone will help you soon.” Computers that lie to us should be fired (and real people hired to take their place).
Sometimes the computer at the other end of the phone line refers you to a web site. Web sites are on computers. It’s a vicious circle.
Not only should companies hire real people to answer phones, they should cast them in their TV commercials. I happen to know that the cartoon characters in ads are generated by (you guessed it) computers.
Replacing computers with real people may sound extreme, but, considering the country’s jobs situation, isn’t it worth a try?
Great advice
I read an article that said the typical symptoms of stress are: eating too much, impulse buying, and driving too fast. Are they kidding? That’s my idea of a perfect day.
February
If you think the holiday season is over, wait till you see February. First, it’s Black History Month. Then we also get Groundhog Day, Chinese New Year, Super Bowl Sunday, Lincoln’s Birthday, Washington’s Birthday, Valentines Day, President’s Day, Mardi Gras, and Ash Wednesday. This year February gets an extra day in order to fit everything in.
Fame
A visitor to a certain college paused to admire the new Hemingway Hall that had been built on campus.
“It’s a pleasure to see a building named for Ernest Hemingway,” said the visitor.
“Actually,” said his guide, “it’s named for Joshua Hemingway. No relation.”
The visitor was surprised. “Joshua Hemingway? Was he also a writer?”
“Yes, indeed,” said the guide. “He wrote the check.”
Ferry story
Tom loved living on Staten Island but wasn’t crazy about the ferry. If you missed a ferry late at night you had to spend the next hour or so wandering the deserted streets of lower Manhattan.
So, when he spotted a ferry no more than fifteen feet from the dock, he decided he wouldn’t risk an hour’s wait. He made a running leap and landed on his hands and knees—a little bruised maybe, but safe on deck.
He got up, brushed himself off, and announced proudly to a bystander, “Well, I made that one, didn’t I?”
“Sure did,” the bystander said, “but you should have waited a minute or two. This ferry is about to dock.”
This week’s lawyer
Two lawyers were walking along, negotiating a case.
“Look,” said one to the other, “let’s be honest with each other.”
“Okay, you first,” replied the other.
That was the end of the discussion.
Last words
Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? He’s all right now.

Posted in Roger on Main St.Comments Off

EarthTalk®

E – The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Are there healthy, green-friendly mouthwashes? I’ve heard that some contain formaldehyde and other nasty substances.                     — Marina Sandberg, Albany, NY

Many mainstream mouthwashes contain ingredients that you definitely don’t want to swallow, or even put down the drain. According to the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia’s (EHANS’s) “Guide to Less Toxic Products”—a free online resource designed to help consumers choose healthier, greener everyday products—conventional mouthwash is often alcohol-based, with an alcohol content ranging from 18-26 percent. “Products with alcohol can contribute to cancers of the mouth, tongue and throat when used regularly,” the guide reports, adding that a 2009 review in the Dental Journal of Australia confirmed the link between alcohol-based mouthwashes and an increased risk of oral cancers.
And you might want to avoid mouthwashes with fluoride (aka sodium fluoride). While fluoride may help fight cavities, ingesting too much of it has been linked to neurological problems and could be a cancer trigger as well. Common mouthwash sweeteners have also been linked to health problems: Saccharin is a suspected carcinogen while sucralose may trigger migraines. Synthetic colors can also be troublesome.
Some brands contain formaldehyde (aka quanternium-15). According to the National Cancer Institute, overexposure to formaldehyde can cause a burning sensation in the eyes, nose and throat as well as coughing, wheezing, nausea and skin irritation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers formaldehyde a “probable human carcinogen” and research has shown an association between long term workplace exposure and several specific cancers, including leukemia. Few of us are exposed to as much formaldehyde as, say, morticians, but does that mean its okay to swish it around in our mouths every day?
Other problematic ingredients in many conventional mouthwashes include sodium lauryl sulfate, polysorbate, cetylpyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride, all which have been shown to be toxic to organisms in the aquatic environments where these chemicals end up after we spit them out.
So what’s a concerned green consumer to do? EHANS recommends the following mouthwashes that do not contain alcohol, fluoride, artificial colors or sweeteners: Anarres Natural Candy Cane Mouthwash, Auromere Ayurvedic Mouthwash, Beauty with a Cause Mouthwash, Jason Natural Cosmetics Tea Tree Oil Mouthwash, Dr. Katz TheraBreath Oral Rinses, Hakeem Herbal Mouthwash, and Miessence Freshening Mouthwash. Besides these brands, the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep Cosmetic Database also lists Tom’s of Maine Natural Baking Soda Mouthwash, Healing-Scents Mouthwash, and Neal’s Yard Remedies Lavender and Myrrh Mouthwash as least harmful to people and the environment.
You can also make your own all-natural mouthwash at home. Eco-friendly consumer advice columnist Annie Berthold Bond recommends mixing warm water, baking soda or sea salt, and a drop of peppermint and/or tea tree oil for a refreshing and bacteria-excising rinse. Another recipe involves combining distilled or mineral water with a few dashes of fresh mint and rosemary leaves and some anise seeds; mix well and swish! A quick Internet search will yield many other down-home natural mouthwash formulas.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.

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Fighting the five most common foot woes

(ARA) – From eating better foods to getting an adequate amount of sleep and exercise, we’re a very health-aware society. So why is it that many Americans routinely overlook one of the cornerstones of good health?
While nearly 70 percent of Americans say they want to be healthier five years from now, just 51 percent recognize that foot health can be a key to achieving that goal, according to a survey from the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA).
“Nearly eight in 10 adults have experienced some type of foot ailment in their lives. Yet despite the pain, close to three in 10 do nothing about it, simply choosing to live with their pain,” says Dr. Michael King, a podiatrist and president of APMA. “Meanwhile, more than half of those surveyed said they had endured foot pain at some point in their lives but have not sought treatment from a podiatrist.”
So what are the five most common types of foot problems and what causes them? Here are some tips from today’s podiatrists:
* Nail problems are one of the most prevalent foot woes in both men and women. These problems can range from ingrown toenails to fungal infections. Ingrown toenails—a condition in which the corners of sides of a nail dig painfully into the soft tissue of the nail grooves—is the most common form of nail problem. To avoid ingrown toenails, trim nails straight across and don’t dig into the corners. If a toenail becomes infected, see a podiatrist immediately for treatment. Those with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and other circulatory disorders should seek a podiatrist’s care on a regular basis to help prevent complications.
* Sweaty feet and foot odor are two-foot conditions that are often experienced together. While stinky feet are definitely embarrassing, feet that sweat excessively can lead to other foot problems, even creating an environment conducive to the development of athlete’s foot. Closed shoes make feet sweat, but in the winter you can’t avoid wearing them. Instead, practice good foot hygiene. Wash feet daily with soap and water, keep shoes and socks dry, and choose socks that wick away moisture. Change shoes and socks regularly and consider rubbing cornstarch or applying antiperspirant directly onto the soles of your feet.
* Pain in the ball of the feet. Nearly one-third of adults have reported pain in the balls of their feet. Pain in this location can be caused by over-exertion, injury or ill-fitting shoes. To avoid, always wear well-fitting, supportive and activity-appropriate shoes when walking, running or engaging in other physical activity. If necessary, replace the insoles that came in the shoes with ones that provide additional cushioning.
* Heel pain. This type of pain can have many sources, including weight gain, excessive foot flattening, muscle imbalance, injury or even improper footwear. To kick heel pain to the curb, always be sure to warm up and stretch properly before and after exercise. If wearing high heels, opt for heels that are no more than two to three inches in height. For persistent pain, treatment can range from prescribed orthotic devices and medications to cortisone injections, physical therapy and rarely, surgery.
* Bunions – A bunion is an enlargement of the joint at the base of the big toe. Treatments range from self-remedies such as using a bunion pad around the bony prominence, to ice packs to reduce the swelling, and avoiding shoes that could irritate the bunion and even make the problem worse. For persistent pain, see a podiatrist for a full range of treatment options.
“While foot problems are common, that doesn’t mean people should be resigned to living with pain,” King says. “Consulting today’s podiatrist can help people feel better sooner, and get back to living healthier lives.”

Posted in Featured, HealthComments Off

Lady Red Hawks roll over Red Skins

Lady Red Hawk Tiffany Karger had a career best scoring 26 points against the Red Skins.

Tuesday night the ladies from Cedar Springs hosted the Belding Redskins in girls basketball but they were not very generous hosts. Cedar got the victory by a final score of 56 to 32.
Cedar got off to a fast start in the first quarter and at one point led 15-2. Belding fought back in the second to close the lead to 8 points, with about four minutes to go in the quarter, before Cedar reasserted themselves to take a 27 to 14 into the break.
The second half was a shooting clinic by Cedar as they made 11 of 16 shots for 69 percent. Coach Taylor said it was gratifying to see the girls work the game plan that they had put in place this week.  “We played strong defensively, keeping our girls in front of us and denying their drives.  We did have some shot lapses where we seemed to play too loose and we have to eliminate those.”
The Red Hawks made 20 of 33 shots for the game and had a 28 point lead at one point in fourth quarter.
Tiffany Karger had a career best scoring 26 points while making 11 of 13 shots from the field and pulling in 10 rebounds. Rachael Ludtke followed with 7 points; Brittany Todd had 6, as did Hannah Wight. The rest of the scoring was Chaya Coxon with 5, Molly Holtrop, Shaelyn Fasel, and Jeanette Sukstas each contributed 2 point.
The Red Hawks have two more contests this week. Friday night they will meet West Catholic in a battle for the lead in the OK Blue Conference. On Saturday afternoon they travel to Howard City to face Tri County in a make up game from earlier this season.

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CS Girls suffer second defeat of the season

Lady Red Hawk Brittany Todd pulled down 11 rebounds and made 8 points against Kent City last week.

The Lady Red Hawks went down to defeat for only the second time this season, 72-51, at the hands of Kent City, who posted their tenth win against no losses. Cedar had two consecutive games postponed prior to the matchup against Kent City on January 19, and had not played in almost two weeks. They looked a little rusty especially from the free throw line in the first half, making only 6 of 17 charity attempts. Even with the poor shooting, they were tied 27-27 with the Class C number 4 rated Eagles.
The second half was a totally different story as the Eagles reached for another gear and put the Red Hawks in the rearview mirror.  Cedar gave up 45 points to the Eagles in the second half of the game. Previously Cedar had not give up more than 44 points in an entire game this season. Kent City hit over 70 percent from the field in the second half and over 40 percent from the three-point line for the game.
“We just got out worked in the second half,” said Coach Scott Taylor. “But as I told the girls, this was a good test and Kent City is a good team but that it doesn’t affect us as we go forward with our conference schedule. We need to be able to put this game behind us.”
Cedar was led by senior Tiffany Karger’s double/double of 16 points and 10 rebounds. Sophomore Brittany Todd pulled down 11 rebounds to go with her 8 points. Other scorers for Cedar were Rachael Ludtke with 10, Chaya Coxon and Molly Holtrop with 6 apiece, Hannah Wight with 4, and Allie Veltkamp with 1.
Kent City was led by Sonnie Kurnat with 19 points and 8 steals and Kara Carlson chipped in 18.
Cedar faced conference foe Belding Tuesday (see story this page), and will face West Catholic on Friday.

Posted in SportsComments Off

Never Settle!

Cedar Springs formed their first 5th/6th grade competitive cheer team this year.  While it’s uncommon in this area to see girls compete at this age level, coaches Amy Arnold, Deb Garza and Barb Chong had hoped their team would gain experience and get a feel for what competition will be like when they reach middle school. The girls, however, had something else in mind.  It was evident they weren’t about to settle for anything less than the best, and their hard work and dedication paid off last Saturday when they placed first at Catholic Central High School finishing ahead of Vanguard Charter and Kenowa Hills. Their performance can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3N7pTAPVz8.
The team performs again this Thursday at Cedar Springs High School and will finish their season this Saturday at East Kentwood High School.

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