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Archive | October, 2011

Preventing and treating breast cancer

(ARA) – Compared to other forms of cancer, breast cancer gets a lot of attention. But that attention is well-deserved, because the chances of a woman developing breast cancer are greater than nearly any other form of cancer. In fact, one in eight women will experience breast cancer during her lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society.
The good news is advances are being made every day to catch breast cancer earlier and treat it effectively once it’s caught. Being diagnosed with breast cancer is far from a death sentence – five-year survival rates are 93 percent for those who catch it in its earliest stage. Due partially to its prevalence and improved treatment, approximately 2.5 million breast cancer survivors are living in the United States today.
In addition to the sheer number of people affected by the disease, breast cancer presents patients with many difficult, and often scary, decisions. “People forget that one of the unique aspects of breast cancer is the fact that most women do have a choice,” says Dr. Elisa Port, co-director of the Dubin Breast Center of The Tisch Cancer Institute at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. They have a choice between lumpectomy and mastectomy, and oftentimes those choices are very equal – and that’s just one example.”
Finding the information necessary to make these decisions and the support to get through cancer treatment procedures and beyond can be difficult. Dr. Eva Andersson-Dubin, a breast cancer survivor, doctor and former Miss Sweden, helped fund and develop the recently opened Dubin Breast Center, along with co-directors Dr. Port and Dr. George Raptis, in hopes of providing a facility where patients could find these services and information under one roof. If you’re dealing with breast cancer, or are a survivor, Dubin recommends looking for the following type of care:
* Finding a care center where all services are located under one roof can greatly ease much of the stress that comes along with your fight against cancer. Choosing a facility that allows you to have one electronic medical record, while also offering screening, treatment and counseling services, can streamline your experience and allow you to devote all of your attention to getting better. Through her own experiences and from talking to other women who have dealt with breast cancer, Dubin found that lugging scans and paperwork from appointment to appointment is one of the largest sources of frustration for patients.
* Beating cancer means more than just winning the physical battle. Much of the fight against cancer and the life changes it brings is psychological. Look for a treatment facility that cares for the whole patient by offering services like oncofertility (reproductive health for cancer patients), nutrition and psychological counseling, and possibly even massage therapy. A treatment center that involves the whole family in your treatment and offers counseling services to them as well as you can play a huge role in helping you beat the disease.
* Ask if your care center has radiologists who specialize in mammography, breast ultrasound, breast MRI and breast biopsy.  You might also ask if the center has digital mammography and any new technology such as 3D mammography – an advanced version of a conventional mammogram. 3D mammography, called tomosynthesis, helps radiologists see through layers of breast tissue facilitating the early diagnosis of breast cancer and reducing callbacks for additional screening, which can cause stress and anxiety.
* Look for a care center that offers care options well after your treatment has finished. Because a brush with cancer is a life-altering experience, having someone there to provide counseling services or answer questions as you go forward is an invaluable resource.
Experts in the field of breast cancer treatment agree that a comprehensive, lifelong approach to treatment is best. “Those with breast cancer benefit enormously from a comprehensive approach to their care that also focuses on their needs as individuals,” says Nancy G. Brinker, founder and CEO of Susan G. Komen for the Cure.
“Our goal for the Dubin Breast Center is to provide patients with seamless care,” says Dubin. “From breast cancer screening to diagnosis to treatment and survivorship, patients will receive personalized, comprehensive care in a welcoming, private and reassuring setting.” The center provides all-in-one facility that offers a soothing atmosphere for breast cancer patients and survivors.
Since early detection is key when battling breast cancer, The Mount Sinai Medical Center urges anyone experiencing the following symptoms of breast cancer to visit a physician:
* A lump or thickening near the breast, in your underarm area or in your neck
* A change in the size or shape of a breast
* Nipple discharge or tenderness, or the nipple becoming pulled back or inverted into the breast
* The skin of your breast becoming ridged or pitted, similar to the skin of an orange
* Any change in the way your breast looks or feels
For more information on breast cancer and treatment visit www.dubinbreastcenter.org.

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Humor and Lou Gehrig’s?

By Kris Galle

We have been sharing some letters from Kris Galle, age 70, of Cedar Springs, who has been suffering from ALS—better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Kris died this past week (see obituary). Her sister, Sidney Prater, had dropped off this letter in the days before Kris’s death and told us it was her most recent writing about what she was going through. The family was glad to be able to laugh with her, and shared what she had written in hopes it would bring a smile to the face of others who are caring for a family member.
Our condolences to the family and friends of Kris. May she rest in peace.

Fruit flies

Fruit flies. Does anyone know where they come from? Both Glenn and Lindsey know how to tell their sex but I’d rather know why they’re here at all. This week they’ve been circling my head. Does this mean I’m dying and it’s an early sign before the vultures start circling? Maybe they’re mini scouts. And where are the kids going to use their knowledge of how to tell a fruit fly’s sex? Why do we care?
This family has used a lot of humor to get us through the last few months. It helps. Once I was coughing, mouth full and trying to tell Lindsey to bring me a towel. Judd calmly looks up and in an inquiring tone says, “What’s that Lassie? Timmy’s in the well?” I still laugh.
Another time, I was racing up the ramp for the bathroom and Evan said, “Look Uncle Judd, Oma’s got it in third gear. It seems like just last week she could only do first gear.” To which Judd replied, “Yes, they grow up so fast.”
It’s the joking and the small kindnesses that make each day so much brighter. Things like Lindsey sitting with us at church and her visits. When the senior band members were recognized at the football game, she presented me with her carnation. That made this “Little old lady from Pasadena” very happy.
When the boys email me from college or come and visit, it’s a great pick-me-up. I can enjoy Sammantha playing volleyball. Eric took me for a ride in the Corvette. (It’s kind of Eric’s bucket list for me.) He also thought I should experience riding in the cab of a semi. Getting me in and out was no pretty but the view from my perch was. The S-curve in a semi is not the same as in a sedan. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Evan always brings me joy. He’s very caring and protective, and always, always, makes me laugh. I remember when he was about five and we were having a discussion. He looked me in the eye and said, “Au contrary, my little friend.”
Steve always goes ahead of me so he can break my fall. We depend on Lisa, Caroline and Amy for so much. I literally don’t know what we would do without them. I find myself relying on them for more and more.
And the laughter continues with an email from Lisa. If a toad poops in the yard, is it called a toadstool?

Love to all,
Kris

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“Elmo makes music”

Fun & furry musicians arrive in Grand Rapids on Nov. 11

Mark your calendar for a musical event like no other—monsters making music!  Elmo, Abby Cadabby, Big Bird and all their Sesame Street friends are taking to the stage to share their love of music in Sesame Street Live “Elmo Makes Music” at Van Andel Arena from Friday, Nov. 11 through Sunday, Nov. 13. Tickets for all five performances are on sale now!
Jenny, an enthusiastic new music teacher, arrives on Sesame Street only to discover that her instruments are missing. Jenny’s new Muppet friends quickly come to the rescue and discover instruments they never knew existed…rubber duckies, trash can lids and even cookie jars. Elmo, Abby Cadabby and friends teach children that everyone can make and enjoy beautiful music together.
Like television’s Sesame Street, each Sesame Street Live production features timeless lessons for all ages. Through the razzle-dazzle of this Broadway-quality musical production, children learn about patience, acceptance and teamwork.  Adults will appreciate the high-tech stagecraft, cleverly written scripts, and music they’ll recognize and enjoy sharing with children, such as “The Hustle,” “You Should Be Dancing” and “Rockin’ Robin.”  “Elmo Makes Music” features nearly two dozen songs, including classics that children will love to sing along with, such as “C is for Cookie” and “The Alphabet Song.”
Tickets are $12, $16 and $22. A limited number of $30 Gold Circle seats and $55 Sunny Seats** are also available. Opening Night, all seats (excluding Gold Circle and Sunny Seats) are $12. A facility fee of $2.50 will be added to all ticket prices. Additional fees and discounts may apply.
**Special $55 Sunny Seat packages are available at all shows. Sunny Seats feature front row seats and a pre-show Meet & Greet with two Sesame Street Live friends.
For more information, call 616-742-6610. To charge tickets by phone, please call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000. Tickets may also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com.

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“Old Macbeth had a farm”

Admission is free

Montcalm Community College’s drama class presents public performances of “Old Macbeth Had a Farm” on Nov. 12 at 2 p.m., and Nov. 13 at 2 and 4 p.m. in the Barn Theater. Admission is free. In this spoof on Shakespeare’s classic story adapted by Tim Kochenderfer, Mr. Macbeth has a bright future at Colonel Duncan’s Chicken Shack—especially after murdering the CEO, seizing the reins of the company, killing off his colleagues, and being assured by a coven of witches that he can’t be harmed. What could possibly go wrong?
Area schools and other groups may book private performances for the months of November and December by contacting Performing Arts Coordinator Val Vander Mark at valv@montcalm.edu or 989-328-1218.  The cost per private performance is $75.

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This week’s happenings…

Fashion show/jewelry party Grace Full Elegance on a budget
Oct 28: The Womens ministry of Solon Center Wesleyan Church invites you to enjoy a Free fashion show on Friday, October 28th @ 7pm. Grace Full Elegance will demonstrate how to dress stylishly yet still saving $$. The items will be offered at silent auction and Premier jewelry will also be available to be purchased. All proceeds will go toward the advancement of ministry to women. There will also be snacks & door prizes. Call the church at 616-696-3229 to reserve a spot for yourself and all your friends. The church is located at 15671 Algoma avenue, just north of 19 Mile Rd. #42

Trunk or Treat
Oct. 29: “Trunk or Treat” – Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake Avenue NE, 1½ miles south of M-57, 6 – 8 p.m. Saturday, October 29.  Treats, hot dogs, hot chocolate in a very safe environment.  All kids welcome!  Don’t forget your costumes!  #43

Family harvest celebration
Oct. 31: Pine Ridge Bible Camp will be holding its annual Family Harvest Celebration on Monday, October 31st. Come anytime between 6pm – 8pm to check out the decorated cabins and enjoy a night out with the family. This is a Free family event that includes wagon rides, puppets, games, cider, treats and a trip through treat town for some candy. Pine Ridge is located just 5 miles east of town on 17 Mile Rd. Call 616-696-8675 for more information. #42,43

Friends of the Spencer Library Meeting
Nov. 1: Join the friends of the Spencer Library to plan fundraisers and outreach events. Tues. Nov. 1, 7 pm at 14960 Meddler Ave. 616-784-2007.  #43

Sand Lake Library Huge Book Sale
Nov. 3-5: Books, magazines, movies, CDs and more at great prices. Book Sale will take place at the Sand Lake VFW, corner of Lake Street and Fifth Street, Sand Lake. Donations for the sale are appreciated. Sponsored by the Friends of the Sand Lake/Nelson Township Library. Thurs., Nov. 3, 10 am – 7 pm, Fri., Nov. 4, 10 am – 7 pm. Sat., Nov. 5, 10 am – 2 pm.  #43

Fiddlers Jamboree
Nov. 5: The Original Michigan Fiddlers Association announces a Fiddlers Jamboree on Sat. Nov. 5 at the Coral Community Building, 4662 Bailey Rd. Jamboree: 1 – 5 pm. Open microphone 5 – 6:15 pm. Dance 6:30 – 9:30 pm. round and square. Free admission. Donations welcome. Lunch and dinner being served. Need more info? Contact Jo Sears, 616-984-2597, Barb Jorgensen, 616-984-5552 or Tommy Egan, 616-837-9050.  #43

Holiday Craft Bazaar
Nov. 5: Holy Family Parish  presents a Holiday Craft Bazaar, Sat. Nov. 5, 9 am – 3 pm. Over 30 booths, homemade luncheon, live music, free kid’s crafts and activities. Drawings every 15 minutes. 425 S. State St., Sparta.  #43

Annual Fall Sale
Nov. 5: The Cedar Springs United Methodist Church Women’s Group is having their annual Fall Sale on Sat. Nov. 5 from 9am to 2pm.  Come start your Christmas shopping with us.  We will have crafts, gently used jewelry, books, toys, knick knacks, Christmas decorations along with baked goods.  Proceeds are going to the CS United Methodist Women’s missions.  #43,44b

Christmas Art/Fine Craft Sale
Nov. 5: On Sat. Nov. 5, the Rogue River Artists Association will be holding its Annual Christmas Art & Fine Craft Sale and Show. Member’s artwork will be on display and for sale. There will be art featuring, watercolors, acrylics, oils, mixed media, pottery, fabric art, jewelry and woodcarving. Light refreshments will be served. The show will be held a the Rockford United Methodist Church, 159 Maple St., Rockford from 10 am to 4 pm.  #43

Howard Christensen Nature Center Events
Nov. 10, 11:Full Moon Series: Stuck in a Rut: Thurs., Nov. 10, 7 pm 8:30 pm, Learn basic biology details of Michigan’s favorite mammal: the white-tailed deer. Learn what really happens during the rut from the deer’s point of view. $5/adults, $4/students, $4/seniors, or $12/family. Registration and payment due November 4. Also, Equestrian Riders – Fri., Nov. 11, 8 am 5:30 pm. One Special Day Only: Horse riding will be permitted on this day on well-marked (yellow ribbon) trails, you supply the horse we supply the trails. $8/adults, $6/students, $6/seniors, or $16/family. Registration and payment due November 5. The Nature Center is located at 16190 Red Pine Dr., 616-675-3158.  #43

Church Bazaar
Nov. 12: The Solon Center Wesleyan Church will present its annual craft bazaar, Saturday, November 12th from 9 am – 3 pm.  Lots of vendors, delicious fresh baked goods, and a nice variety of miscellaneous items too numerous to mention. There’s definitely something for everyone.  Cinnamon rolls and coffee and a lunch counter are also available.   The church is located at 15671 Algoma Avenue, just north of 19 Mile Road. #43

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Strike a pose

Hunters seek them while drivers try to avoid them. Post publisher Lois Allen stopped and took a “shot” at this young deer while riding as a passenger in a friend’s vehicle in Spencer township last week. He seems to have no fear of cars or cameras as he poses for his front page picture. Can you top this picture? Get a great pic and send it to us at news@cedarspringspost.com.

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Man injured when car hits tree

This van slammed into a tree in the Springs Church parking lot Monday. Post photo by J. Reed.

A Sparta man suffered several injuries Monday his van ran into a tree off a church parking lot.
Thomas Brant, 67, of Sparta, was picking up a box of food in the Springs Church parking lot at 135 N. Grant in Cedar Springs Monday afternoon.
A budget rental truck was set up in the parking lot, and seniors were driving up to get their food. “He stopped to get his food, and then the van shot forward,” said witness Robert Wright, who was in line behind Brant. “He side swiped the trunk and ran into the tree.”
Cedar Springs Police Officer Chad Potts said that while leaning over to open the door, the victim’s foot may have slipped and hit the accelerator.
Brant was treated by Cedar Springs Fire and Rescue and transported to the hospital by Rockford Ambulance with a possible broken arm, dislocated shoulder, and burns on his face from the air bags being deployed.

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Water tower back online

The maintenance on the Cedar Springs water tower is complete, and the tower and all fire hydrants are back online.
The tower went offline in August. During that time, the Cedar Springs DPW department encountered a few hiccups, including a boil water advisory when pressure dropped as a result of a power outage; a false anonymous tip to the DEQ that the blasting dust emanating from the top of the tower was toxic; a site visit by the DEQ that resulted in a citation for air quality despite the fact they followed the DEQ’s suggestions; and a complaint from a woman whose laundry turned brown.
The boil water advisory affected several businesses on the west side of town. All samples came back negative for bacteria.
The false tip to the DEQ Air Quality Division said that lead dust was being emitted from the tower. DPW supervisor Roger Belknap visited the work site August 26 and asked the crew to stop blasting activities until a bonnet could be put in place, which they did. The crew chief also explained that the blasting media they use encapsulates the coatings, pulling it downward, and the dust coming from the top was not hazardous. The DEQ arrived on scene on August 30 to investigate, and suggested the bonnet, which was already ordered, and on August 31 the DEQ Hazardous Waste division took samples, which all came back negative for lead and chrome. They also visited on September 7 and on September 19, issued a violation notice of air quality. The notice said they were blast cleaning without proper enclosure, requiring an air use permit to install, and that fallout adversely impacted neighboring properties. They noted that Utility Services Company, contracted by the city, had installed and commenced operation of equipment without a permit. The city was invited to send them a response if they felt this was inaccurate.
Belknap sent the DEQ a response outlining all the events that had taken place and the city’s response to the situation. The city then got a letter back from the DEQ saying the situation had been resolved.
“I think it was a matter of procedure, of protocol on their end (to issue the violation),” said Belknap. He noted that they had the proper permits for drinking water, but not air. “They are putting the contractors on notice that they need to abide by permits if doing work in Michigan,” he said. “Hopefully the process will help other water tower projects go through the same scrutiny as other projects when it comes to sandblasting.”
Opal Waller complained both the Post (see page 5) and the city about her water turning her laundry brown. Belknap explained that with the water tower offline and no hydrant flushings, a slug of iron may have built up and then been released. “All communities have problems with brown water from time to time,” he said.  He noted that the water in Cedar Springs is naturally hard and has a high iron content.

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Author speaks to writers group

T. K. Francisco speaking at Schuler’s on Alpine. Sitting on the table is Egion, one of the angelic animals in her book, Seven Wings and the Bleeding Twin Flowers.

Local author Tammy Francisco spoke to the West Michigan Christian Writers Group based in Cedar Springs and had a book signing at Schuler’s in Grand Rapids Thursday night, October 13, to release her new novel entitled Seven Wings and the Bleeding Twin Flowers. Her young adult/adult Christian futuristic series of seven books, (this one being the first in the series) was accepted for publication by Credo House Publishing of Grand Rapids in May. Two weeks later Tate Publishing also made her an offer.
The family-friendly novel takes place on an estate in Cedar Springs, Michigan (where she resides) in the year 2027 and the apocalypse has begun. The series is about a family of seven team members who are led on a quest through time for a cure, through Jaden’s prophesying dreams. Five of the seven family members travel 100 years into the future to meet up with two future family members who join them on their quest to find the bleeding twin flowers. The world has drastically changed and is led by an evil world head. Through Jaden’s dreams, God gives the team clues to several different locations leading them on a journey from Cedar Springs, Michigan to their final destination, St. Helena Island. Along the way, God sends each team member a unique angelic animal who possesses special powers and who gives their team members those same abilities, abilities that are needed to fight the evil creatures awaiting their arrival. This family team’s faith, determination, and dream of finding the cure will captivate and inspire readers of all ages.
T. K. Francisco is especially excited to share her novel series in local schools. She is visiting the local area schools at no charge and donating 10 percent of the sales in free books to the school libraries. For more information, visit her website at www.tkfrancisco.com.Francisco is donating 10 percent of the proceeds of this novel to DeVos Children’s Hospital for cancer research.
She will also be at Robin’s Booklist in Greenville signing books on Saturday, October 22nd from 11:00 am- 1:00 pm.  Not only is her book available in a paperback version, it is also available in Kindle format as well. Her publisher is also working on Barnes and Noble the Nook, Ebook, and Ipad versions. They should be ready soon.
When asked what the most important thing that she has done over the last four years to stay on the right track to get published her reply was, “To be a member of this writers group.” Tammy Kay Francisco would like to encourage anyone who has a dream of becoming an author to join a writers group. For more information about the West Michigan Christian Writers Group visit their website at Local author Tammy Francisco spoke to the West Michigan Christian Writers Group based in Cedar Springs and had a book signing at Schuler’s in Grand Rapids Thursday night, October 13, to release her new novel entitled Seven Wings and the Bleeding Twin Flowers. Her young adult/adult Christian futuristic series of seven books, (this one being the first in the series) was accepted for publication by Credo House Publishing of Grand Rapids in May. Two weeks later Tate Publishing also made her an offer.
The family-friendly novel takes place on an estate in Cedar Springs, Michigan (where she resides) in the year 2027 and the apocalypse has begun. The series is about a family of seven team members who are led on a quest through time for a cure, through Jaden’s prophesying dreams. Five of the seven family members travel 100 years into the future to meet up with two future family members who join them on their quest to find the bleeding twin flowers. The world has drastically changed and is led by an evil world head. Through Jaden’s dreams, God gives the team clues to several different locations leading them on a journey from Cedar Springs, Michigan to their final destination, St. Helena Island. Along the way, God sends each team member a unique angelic animal who possesses special powers and who gives their team members those same abilities, abilities that are needed to fight the evil creatures awaiting their arrival. This family team’s faith, determination, and dream of finding the cure will captivate and inspire readers of all ages.
T. K. Francisco is especially excited to share her novel series in local schools. She is visiting the local area schools at no charge and donating 10 percent of the sales in free books to the school libraries. For more information, visit her website at www.tkfrancisco.com.Francisco is donating 10 percent of the proceeds of this novel to DeVos Children’s Hospital for cancer research.
She will also be at Robin’s Booklist in Greenville signing books on Saturday, October 22nd from 11:00 am- 1:00 pm.  Not only is her book available in a paperback version, it is also available in Kindle format as well. Her publisher is also working on Barnes and Noble the Nook, Ebook, and Ipad versions. They should be ready soon.
When asked what the most important thing that she has done over the last four years to stay on the right track to get published her reply was, “To be a member of this writers group.” Tammy Kay Francisco would like to encourage anyone who has a dream of becoming an author to join a writers group. For more information about the West Michigan Christian Writers Group visit their website at www.westmichiganchristianwriters.com.

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School buses are like traffic signals

Just under 900 school buses were involved in crashes last year. The Rockford school bus above was involved in one a couple of weeks ago when a motorist ran a stop sign. Luckily no children were on board.

National School Bus Safety Week is Oct. 17-21

Motorists are reminded to treat school bus lights like traffic signals during National School Bus Safety Week, Oct. 17-21.
When a school bus’ overhead lights are flashing yellow, motorists should prepare to stop.
    When its overhead lights are flashing red, motorists must stop.
    When a bus’ hazard lights are flashing, motorists should proceed with caution.
Failure to obey these rules could result in costly fines and fees. In July, Public Acts 59 and 60 of 2011 took effect, increasing the penalties for motorists who fail to exercise caution in school bus safety zones. The new laws double the fines for moving violations committed in a school bus safety zone and make it a misdemeanor for injuring and a felony for killing a child getting on or off a school bus.
Motorists should also slow down in or near school and residential areas and watch for children emerging from between parked cars and other objects.
“School buses are considered the safest form of transportation to and from school,” said Michael L. Prince, Office of Highway Safety Planning director. “However, getting on and off the bus poses a great risk to students.”
In 2010, Michigan school buses were involved in 882 crashes that resulted in 273 injuries, according to Michigan Traffic Crash Facts. A majority of those injured were drivers and passengers in motor vehicles involved in crashes with buses. Two people died in school bus-involved crashes, a passenger vehicle occupant and a student who was struck by a tree branch while leaning out the bus window.
During National School Bus Safety Week, parents are also encouraged to remind children about safety while waiting for the bus and walking to school.
When entering and exiting a school bus, children should walk 10 feet away from the bus before turning. Children crossing in front of the bus should move forward, away from the bus until they can make eye contact with the driver and should never cross without the driver’s permission.
Order free traffic safety flyers on school bus safety at www.michian./ohsp. Click on “traffic safety materials.”

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