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Categorized | Keeping the Faith

The Gospel according to Nick’s

Ronnie McBrayer

Ronnie McBrayer

Just down the road from my house is a legendary seafood joint called Nick’s. Aesthetically, and I say this with great affection, Nick’s is not much to look at. The building is constructed from whitewashed, concrete blocks, now decades old. The parking lot is often flooded with rainwater, and chickens roam about in the yard. The ceiling is too low for my liking, and the view of the surrounding bayou is obscured by windows a touch too dark.

So if you were driving by, uninformed and uninitiated regarding this establishment, you might think Nick’s to be some notorious hole-in-the-wall dive, and keep driving. That would be your incalculable loss. For three generations, the Nick family has been serving glorious local seafood, shucking the best Gulf Coast oysters, and slinging the coldest brew around. Trey and Jennifer Nick, the restaurateurs that now operate this roadside oasis, keep the parking lot flooded alright—flooded with cars. People just can’t stay away. This has a lot to do with the food, of course, but that’s not the main draw. The Nicks know how to make you feel welcome. They make you feel at home. And what the atmosphere lacks visually, it more than makes up for with sincere friendship.

The church could learn a few things from the Nick family. Their success is not the result of clever marketing, pumping thousands of dollars into publicity campaigns, or arguing that their food is better than some competitor down the street. No, the Gospel According to Nick’s is quite simple: Welcome people as friends, surround them with love, and then send them out satisfied, with joy in their heart and a good word to share on their lips.

In this day when “image is everything,” it’s easy for the church to cave in to prevailing corporate wisdom: Elegant buildings, comfortable parking lots, expertly executed marketing plans, Disney-ready children’s programs, and stage-practiced Sunday services. But like many folks, I would rather wade across a river in hip-boots to be with people who care about me, to be in that place “where everybody knows your name,” than to be treated like just another consumer through the turnstiles. We must care for people as unique, distinct individuals, and not as a means to padding our pews and our coffers. The Nicks are right. Treat people like family. Feed them well. And send them on their way with joy.

Ronnie McBrayer is the author of “Leaving Religion, Following Jesus.” He writes and speaks about life, faith, and Christ-centered spirituality. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

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